HelpHub Localisation Plan

Hi! This is Jon from docs team. This post outlines our plan for localising HelpHub for Rosetta sites. HelpHub is currently live on English wordpress.org site and can be accessed from https://wordpress.org/support/ (e.g. https://wordpress.org/support/category/getting-started/ ).

We’d like Polyglots teamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/.’s input to make this translation as smoothly as possible.

Background

At  WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe (Summit) we discussed the localisationLocalization Localization (sometimes shortened to "l10n") is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local "look-and-feel." of WordPress systems such as DevHub and HelpHub.

We recognised that GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org. was not great for long-form translation and we evaluated the possibility of actually re-engineering GlotPress (or at least translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins.) to work for it. But this is a huge undertaking and it may involve formalisation of the whole of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/’s translation.

So it was indicated it might be best for HelpHub to look at translation out of GlotPress.

Therefore HelpHub was designed as a stand-alone pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that could be activated at numerous places such as RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites.

Plan Phases (Proposal)

Phase 1

Goals

  • Test HelpHub localisation on one localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/’s Rosetta site.
  • Migrate existing English content, but update notification/diff will not be available yet.

Candidate LocalesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/

  • Japanese, since they maintain their own Codex site with a large number of docs
  • French (France), since they want to set up a fr_FR Documentation team (~10 volunteers for the moment)

Process

  1. Activate HelpHub plugin on Rosetta [MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.]
    1. Need Meta help as Rosetta sites are likely on a different network
  2. Migrate English content over (without activating HelpHub’s home interface) [Locale Team]
    1. Explore automated process (but unlikely due to WordPress.org infra)
    2. At this phase, this may need to be a manual process
    3. If manual process, adapt and refine tracking system of migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. designed by Docs Team
  3. Translation by locale team based on English contents [Locale Team]
  4. Possibly re-take related screenshots in locale language [Locale Team]
    1. Create a list of needed screenshots so other locale’s volunteers can contribute as needed
  5. Development work to link English and localised content [Meta]
  6. Define a syndication plan to track updates of the English version and trigger notifications to localisation team [Meta] [Docs]
  7. Activate HelpHub’s home interface on the Rosetta (just this test locale) on /support [Meta]
  8. Adjust the documentation links on the Rosetta site from Codex to HelpHub [Locale Team]
  9. “Push” forums link back to /support/forums [Meta]
  10. Redirect locale’s version of Codex or support materials to locale HelpHub (e.g. https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Help:Redirects) [Locale Team]
  11. Establish communication channel between English HelpHub and locale teams [Docs] [Locale Team]
  12. Write a blog post on the locale news page to announce the move of user support resources [Locale Team]
  13. Do a retrospective and identify pain points [Docs] [Locale Team]
  14. Refine Phase 1 Plan for other locales based on first candidate [Docs]

Phase 2

Goal

Roll out the localisation to more Rosetta sites.

Process

  1. Enable HelpHub plugin on active Rosetta site (individual sign up) [Meta]
    1. What happens to teams without active volunteers? Maybe we’ll show English docs on their site
    2. Explore the possibility of showing machine-translated content
  2. Allow main WordPress.org to reveal that there are other locales’ HelpHubs/Support [Meta]
  3. (To be determined)

+make.wordpress.org/docs

#documentation, #helphub, #rosetta

Feedback & ideas for footer links in Rosetta sites

Hey everyone,

The metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has been working on the new RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. theme and on Rosetta sites in general and they need our feedback. Calling on all localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ managers and people with an opinion about local sites, please help out with feedback and thoughts on footer link functionality in Rosetta:

Quoting the ticket:

Rosetta sites currently have no footer links, primarily because the links in the Global footer aren’t always relevant for them. I would, however, like to add a few links back that are project-relevant, as well as a select few that are sensible for the Rosetta sites themselves.

#rosetta

Hi @ocean90, We would like…

Hi @ocean90,

We would like to be active in our local rosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. site, may we request forum and team P2p2 "p2" is the name of the theme that blogs at make.wordpress.org use (and o2 is the accompanying plugin). When asked to post something "on the p2" by a member of the Polyglots team, that usually means you're asked to post on the team blog https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/.-blog added to tl.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/?

Thank you and kind regards!

#request #forum #rosetta

Hello @ocean90 We wold like…

Hello @ocean90

We wold like a forum and a P2p2 "p2" is the name of the theme that blogs at make.wordpress.org use (and o2 is the accompanying plugin). When asked to post something "on the p2" by a member of the Polyglots team, that usually means you're asked to post on the team blog https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/.-blog added to da.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/

Thanks in advance.

#da_dk #request #forum #rosetta

Local WordPress.org sites content – let’s gather the data

For a while now we’ve been talking about something we call RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. outreach. As most of you know the WordPress Rosetta sites are the local sites for WordPress, associated with a specific localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/. Example: es.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ (Spain), ro.wordpress.org (Romania), bg.wordpress.org (Bulgairia), etc. A full list of the WordPress Rosetta sites can be found on our Teams page.

Historically the people who took care of translations also took care of updating the content of the Rosetta site. But as translation work grows and local communities grow, the roles on a local team are now separated and we can have translation teams (who take care of localizing WordPress) and editorial teams (who publish important WordPress news on the local WordPress.org sites in their native language).

Since having an editorial team is new, but having local teams who organise meetups and WordCamps outside the localizationLocalization Localization (sometimes shortened to "l10n") is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local "look-and-feel." efforts is not that new, the Rosetta outreach project aims to create a bridge between the translation community and the local community teams in order to provide more value to WordPress users all over the world in their own language.

Objective: provide more valuable localized content on local WordPress.org sites

To achieve that we’re focusing the initial efforts on three main things and we need the help of the existing teams for both:

  1. Gather data about the current status of local Rosetta sites
  2. Reach out to event organising local teams to invite them to join the local editorial teams.
  3. Figure out a way to attract people from outside both the polyglots and community teams to become local .org editors

What content should a complete Rosetta site have?

Each team can decide what content their local site should have, but after several discussions during weekly meetings this is what the team recommends:

  • Translated announcements for each WordPress release (the content of https://wordpress.org/news, but localised)
  • Updated showcase with fresh samples of good WordPress work in your language (be careful about the guidelines here, doing a call for showcase examples on a broader community level is your best approach here)
  • Event announcements – local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. announcements, local WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. announcements, calls for speakers, sponsors, volunteers and what not for local events
  • Anything that you feel needs a local community discussion or is an important local topic related to WordPress

What do you can do to help?

  • If you are a Locale manager or a part of a local team, please fill out the data about your local Rosetta site in the “Data” tab of this spreadsheet
  • If the content of your local site is not regularly updated, you can reach out to event organisers in your country and talk to them about being editors in your local Rosetta site and publish content like:
    • WordCamp announcements
    • Meetup announcements
    • Create an events/meetups page
  • If you don’t translate and publish WordPress release announcements regularly, you can think about creating a page on the website that tells people how they can get involved with contributing content in your local language.
  • Volunteer for a regional outreach – you can help us reach out to local teams whose sites are a bit stuck and find contributors who would be willing to help update the content on their Rosetta sites.

Sound interesting? Leave your thoughts in the comments and let’s do this.

Love,

Petya

#local-sites, #local-sites-content, #rosetta

New Team o2s

Two weeks ago we’ve rolled out 11 team o2s for testing. Today we’re pleased to announce that all 71 locales with a current release now have a team o2p2 "p2" is the name of the theme that blogs at make.wordpress.org use (and o2 is the accompanying plugin). When asked to post something "on the p2" by a member of the Polyglots team, that usually means you're asked to post on the team blog https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/..

What should you use the o2 for?

A team o2 can be used for whatever your local community needs. For example, you can use it to talk about WordCamps, meetups, translations, support, documentation, meeting summaries, discussions about new ideas and the likes – in your language.

It can be a great platform for new people who would like to join your translation team. Or a great place to post about upcoming events and invite people to suggest topics. Basically, it’s an open wall for your community to discuss local issues. An official one, on your official local WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ site.

How does your team get an o2?

Every RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. site should have one and every team can get one. If your localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ is currently released for 4.6, your o2 is already created. You can check if you have one by adding “/team” to the address of your Rosetta site. If you don’t already have one, please feel free to request one in a comment below this post.

The following 60 62 sites were created:

team-site

  • #ary: https://ary.wordpress.org/team/
  • #az: https://az.wordpress.org/team/
  • #bn_BD: https://bn.wordpress.org/team/
  • #bo: https://bo.wordpress.org/team/
  • #ca: https://ca.wordpress.org/team/
  • #cs_CZ: https://cs.wordpress.org/team/
  • #cy: https://cy.wordpress.org/team/
  • #da_DK: https://da.wordpress.org/team/
  • #de_CH: https://de-ch.wordpress.org/team/
  • #el: https://el.wordpress.org/team/
  • #en_AU: https://en-au.wordpress.org/team/
  • #en_CA: https://en-ca.wordpress.org/team/
  • #en_GB: https://en-gb.wordpress.org/team/
  • #en_NZ: https://en-nz.wordpress.org/team/
  • #en_ZA: https://en-za.wordpress.org/team/
  • #eo: https://eo.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_AR: https://es-ar.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_CL: https://cl.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_GT: https://es-gt.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_MX: https://es-mx.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_PE: https://pe.wordpress.org/team/
  • #es_VE: https://ve.wordpress.org/team/
  • #eu: https://eu.wordpress.org/team/
  • #fa_IR: https://fa.wordpress.org/team/
  • #fi: https://fi.wordpress.org/team/
  • #fr_BE: https://fr-be.wordpress.org/team/
  • #fr_CA: https://fr-ca.wordpress.org/team/
  • #gd: https://gd.wordpress.org/team/
  • #gl_ES: https://gl.wordpress.org/team/
  • #gu: https://gu.wordpress.org/team/
  • #hau: https://hau.wordpress.org/team/
  • #hi_IN: https://hi.wordpress.org/team/
  • #hr: https://hr.wordpress.org/team/
  • #hu_HU: https://hu.wordpress.org/team/
  • #hy: https://hy.wordpress.org/team/
  • #id_ID: https://id.wordpress.org/team/
  • #is_IS: https://is.wordpress.org/team/
  • #ka_GE: https://ka.wordpress.org/team/
  • #km: https://km.wordpress.org/team/
  • #ko_KR: https://ko.wordpress.org/team/
  • #lt_LT: https://lt.wordpress.org/team/
  • #lv: https://lv.wordpress.org/team/
  • #mr: https://mr.wordpress.org/team/
  • #ms_MY: https://ms.wordpress.org/team/
  • #nb_NO: https://nb.wordpress.org/team/
  • #nn_NO: https://nn.wordpress.org/team/
  • #oci: https://oci.wordpress.org/team/
  • #pl_PL: https://pl.wordpress.org/team/
  • #pt_PT: https://pt.wordpress.org/team/
  • #ro_RO: https://ro.wordpress.org/team/
  • #sk_SK: https://sk.wordpress.org/team/
  • #sl_SI: https://sl.wordpress.org/team/
  • #sq: https://sq.wordpress.org/team/
  • #sr_RS: https://sr.wordpress.org/team/
  • #sv_SE: https://sv.wordpress.org/team/
  • #szl: https://szl.wordpress.org/team/
  • #te: https://te.wordpress.org/team/
  • #th: https://th.wordpress.org/team/
  • #tr_TR: https://tr.wordpress.org/team/
  • #uk: https://uk.wordpress.org/team/
  • #vi: https://vi.wordpress.org/team/
  • #zh_TW: https://tw.wordpress.org/team/

How does o2 work?

A new handbook page “Team o2” has been added to provide some details about the new site, how to manage and use it. Read it and ask any questions that remain in the comments here.

Who has access to the new o2s?

All locale managers get an Editor level access to the new o2s which allows them to customize the site and moderate content. o2s are separate WordPress installs from your Rosetta site, but all your current Locale Managers and Editors are added as users by default. All WordPress.org users can post and comment on locale o2s.

We’re delighted to finally be able to add this feature for all teams and we hope you find it useful to get new contributors and make communication about contributing to WordPress easier in your language.

#announcement, #dev-update

#rosetta

Rosetta Forum Upgrades In Progress – reposting from make/meta

Hey polyglots,

Some of you might have noticed that the metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has started migrating existing forums to bbPress2.

Here’s @jmdodd‘s post from make/meta:

Rosetta Forum Upgrades In Progress

There are also new stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings. added to the Forums project: https://translate.wordpress.org/projects/meta/forums so it would be great if we can get the forums fully translated before all of them migrate.

We’ve been waiting for this for a while and it’s finally happening – thank you meta team <3

P.S. Next step – RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. O2s (🍭💥🎉)

#bbpress, #forums, #rosetta

A “Translate in locale name” page for all Rosetta sites

I’d like to suggest that we recommend adding a “Translate in [localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ name] page to all RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites that don’t already have one.

I worked with @rabmalin, who recently joined the Nepali team, to help him create a page for ne.wordpress.org.

I have created a general template for the page after that and I think it should be included in the instructions about Rosetta sites in the handbook for all new Editors/General Translation EditorsTranslation Editor Translation editors can approve translations for projects. The GTE (General Translation Editor) and LM (Locale Manager) roles can add new users with the "Project Translation Editor" role that can approve translations for specific projects. There are two different Translation Editor roles: General Translation Editor and Project Translation Editor and GTEs of existing localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ that don’t already have one.

It goes without saying that each  team would have the autonomy to modify/include/exclude content from this page or not use the template at all. But like with the standard slide deck about translating WordPress in your language, it can provide a general guideline for new contributors about communicating their transaltion effots.

The “Translate in [locale name] template for Rosetta sites is available here – anyone can comment.

When reviewing the template, let’s try and answer these questions:

  • Have we included all the necessary content for a new contributor to understand how to get involved. If not, what’s missing?
  • Is the page easy to read/understand (when you think about translating it into your language? Can we improve the phrasing so it can make more sense when translated)

Additionally:

@sam @ocean90 Can we think of an option to add this or a version of it as a default page in a Rosetta site next to the Contact and Welcome pages?

With the current situation, there’s a very slim chance of a site existing without being tied to a Translation project. So I think it makes sense to help new locale maintainers by providing this page by default.

Thoughts?

#rosetta

Polyglots achievements in 2015 and goals for 2016

Dear Polyglots,

I was asked to fill a survey about our team’s work in 2015, so I’m sharing what I said in this post. As always, please add your comments and anything important you feel we need to add to our goals for 2016 below this post.

Did the team set any specific goals for 2015?

We did. A lot of those don’t depend on the translation teams but more on the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team as it’s tools to help translators. Here are the goals as mentioned in this post.

  • Aim to have 70 very active, very updated localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ by the end of 2015.
  • Focus on bringing in and mentoring new validators. Everyone’s help here will be invaluable – talk to people about your Polyglots work, find and inspire new translators to join.
  • Get Involved page linked from your local site’s primary menu.
  • Speaking and encouraging people to join the team at meetups
  • Translation sprints! Amazing idea, read more in @nao‘s post and please share your thoughts!

Last year at the community summit, a lot of people didn’t know what Polyglots did. We should try and do something about it this year. Suggestions include talking about it at local meetups and WordCamps.

  • Aim to have 50% locales up to date, currently, it’s just ~35% – this would mean cleaning inactive locales or trying to find validators for them
  • RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites to be integrated with local communities and to start getting fresh content about meetups and WordCamps
  • Finish the Handbook.
  • Team P2s
  • An update on the Rosetta theme and a new bbPressbbPress Free, open source software built on top of WordPress for easily creating forums on sites. https://bbpress.org. theme (hopefully)
  • Polyglots badges.

What were the major accomplishments of the team in 2015?

  • We have 69 active running locales, 57 are released for 4.4
  • There are 79 locales translated 80% and more, 54 of those are translated 100%
  • We added 20 new locales and localizationLocalization Localization (sometimes shortened to "l10n") is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local "look-and-feel." teams to the project in 2015, WordPress now has 158 locales
  • WordPress is now 100% translated in Hindi, one of the top 10 world languages that we were missing before – there are many locales who started at 0 and were completely translated in 2015.
  • We automated Polyglots badges
  • We improved the team documentation and streamlined the processes for requesting a new localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/, requesting to join a team, and requesting translation editorsTranslation Editor Translation editors can approve translations for projects. The GTE (General Translation Editor) and LM (Locale Manager) roles can add new users with the "Project Translation Editor" role that can approve translations for specific projects. There are two different Translation Editor roles: General Translation Editor and Project Translation Editor for specific plugins
  • We have a team. There are several people dedicated to the Polyglots teamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/. and we’re growing the base of contributors involved with helping other contributors (some small equivalent of the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. deputy program)
  • We have regular meetings and communication going in and out of the team
  • We have an active SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel where people get help almost 24/7

Were there any particular challenges to the team achieving its goals?

  • Lack of tools and improvements of the translation management system (GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org.). The tools the team needs are still in development and we’ve been waiting for some of them for a long time. The meta team is helping us as much as they can, but they have a very long list of tasks. With the increased demand for translations (of the 30k plugins in the repositoryWordPress Localization Repository The WordPress Localization Repository at https://i18n.svn.wordpress.org/ is a Subversion repository where official WordPress translations are maintained. See Working with the Translation Repository for details.), the demand for better tools from members of the translation teams increases too.
  • Lack of team P2s which were supposed to be in a year ago makes it hard for translation teams to communicate internally – it’s next to impossible to get in touch with the active translators unless they’re not all in w.org slack (most aren’t), so we’ve been looking for workarounds to help Translation editors talk to their contributors.

There are three particular GlotPress features we’re waiting for:

  • Reject strings with feedback for the contributor (https://glotpress.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/335)
  • Notification center for translation editors and translation contributors on waiting strings, new strings and overall activity in the projects they’re involved with (https://glotpress.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/100)
  • Global glossaries across projects – a feature that would help translation teams keep just one glossary up to date and all projects for the specific locale inherit that glossary.

Has the team set any goals for 2016?

  • Work with local teams to improve local getting started guides for new contributors
  • 100 released locales for the last WordPress release for 2016
  • Top 100 plugins and themes in the repository translated at more than 50% for the 50 most active locales
  • Improve translation management and communication tools (P2s, the three GlotPress features mentioned)
  • Improve the visibility of the Polyglots team across the WordPress ecosystem and get team recognition for releases
  • Increase the number of active translation editors per locale to meet the demand for translations of plugins and teams and keep the quality of the translations high
  • Expand the leadership team to the Asia/Pacific region and have a functioning operation to support contributors in non-European timezones.

Is there anything that would make your work on this team easier in 2016?

  • More development time focused on translation tools
  • Better tools to communicate with translation editors and translation contributors (right now to notify them about an upcoming release we use posts where we @mention them to get their attention – that’s a manual process that takes a lot of time)
  • Rethinking of the processes of freezing stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings. before a release with the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team so that translators have enough time to properly prepare the locales before the release date. I’m already working on this with Drew and the core team.
  • Recognition for translators. If someone can get props for a release for fixing a typo, translation editors who spend hours working to bring that release to more people, should get a mention in the release post. A general mention of the translation efforts would be enough – just let the world know that that release is available in more than 50 languages thanks to the efforts of the translation teams.

Looking forward to your comments and working with all of you in 2016.

Have a wonderful 2016, polyglots!

Cheers,

Petya

#2016-goals, #glotpress, #rosetta

Translation style guides on Rosetta sites & Glossaries

Dear polyglots,

I had a chat with @jenia at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Switzerland’s Contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. today about improving the Glossaries and the translation style guides so we can help new contributors get started faster.

Improve the translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins. Glossaries

Jenia and the Global theme at WordPress.comWordPress.com An online implementation of WordPress code that lets you immediately access a new WordPress environment to publish your content. WordPress.com is a private company owned by Automattic that hosts the largest multisite in the world. This is arguably the best place to start blogging if you have never touched WordPress before. https://wordpress.com/ have an amazing set of Glossaries already built which we can definitely reuse. They have glossaries for 22 languages and I thought that we could reuse them if that’s ok with the translation editorsTranslation Editor Translation editors can approve translations for projects. The GTE (General Translation Editor) and LM (Locale Manager) roles can add new users with the "Project Translation Editor" role that can approve translations for specific projects. There are two different Translation Editor roles: General Translation Editor and Project Translation Editor.

You can check them out at https://en.support.wordpress.com/translation-resources/. They also use GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org., so you can just export their Glossary and import it for your own localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/.

Translation Style Guides on RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites

With the upcoming wave of new contributors around plugins and themes, keeping consistency among translations for the same localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ is essential. It all starts with a good instruction manual, so I thought we could make it a requirement for each team to create at least a short instruction manual with general guide lines for translating.

I know this is a lot to ask and hard work that many of you might be intimidated by. However, we don’t need to invent the wheel. Luckily we already have resources to help us out.

So here are a few resources you can benefit from before building a page

  1. Check out the style guides WordPress.com built for the same 22 languages
  2. Microsoft have super extensive guides for a lot of languages. Those are too long, but might be interesting for many of you anyway. We don’t need such extensive guides. Just general directions.
  3. Facebook have really nice style guides for translating too. They’re shorter and straight to the point.

Including a short introduction page for new translators on your Rosetta sites

Some teams have already done that, but it would be great to include it in most of the Rosetta sites for new contributors.

This is what I think each page should include, but you are welcome to modify depending on your locale requirements:

It would be good to have a discussion about it during the next polyglots chat and leave your comments below with your example pages if you already have one, it would be good to browse ideas and get more suggestions.

Thanks @jenia for all the tips!

Cheers!

Petya

#rosetta

Per-project permissions for Translation Editors (previously Validators)

Author shouldn’t show as validators or be able to validate stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings.Meta Ticket 741

I’m happy to announce that we finally have a more granular system to manange permissions for translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins.. 🎉🎊

Previously anyone with the role of ValidatorValidator See translation editor., Contributor, Author or Editor had the ability to validate strings for a language. Now we have a new role Translation EditorsTranslation Editor Translation editors can approve translations for projects. The GTE (General Translation Editor) and LM (Locale Manager) roles can add new users with the "Project Translation Editor" role that can approve translations for specific projects. There are two different Translation Editor roles: General Translation Editor and Project Translation Editor. The role is a complementary role and can be assigned to editors, authors, contributors or subscribers.
The Users list table has a new column which will display all roles of a user.

user-roles

Only users with the Translation Editors have the the ability to validate and approve strings. To promote a user to a translation editorTranslation Editor Translation editors can approve translations for projects. The GTE (General Translation Editor) and LM (Locale Manager) roles can add new users with the "Project Translation Editor" role that can approve translations for specific projects. There are two different Translation Editor roles: General Translation Editor and Project Translation Editor you can use the action link in the Users list table (see screenshot above) or use the new page Users > Translation Editors.

The page is similar to the Users list table but lists only translation editors.

translation-editors

Here you can also add new translation editors. This form allows you to specify for which projects the editor should get access. With All Projects selected, the translation editor will have validation permissions for all projects, including newly-added projects.

If you select Custom you will be redirected to an Edit Translation Editor screen.

edit-translation-editors

Here you can select one or more projects. The list includes all 12 “master projects”. The editor will have access to all sub projects and newly-added sub projects of a selected “master project”.

With this update badges for translation editors are now automated too. ~300 users have already a new badge! 💥
(Badges are visible at profiles.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//yourname)

The migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. process has moved all validators to the new Translation Editor role, same for editors. Users with the Validator role now have the Subscriber role. All translation editors were whitelisted for all projects, which can be changed as needed. Contributors and authors are untouched. Each team should do a case-by-case review if a contributor/author should be able to approve strings.

I hope you enjoy the update as much as I do. 😀
If you have any questions feel free to use the comments or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” @ocean90 on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

(Badges for translation contributors will come soon.)

#announcement, #glotpress, #rosetta

I have completed the translation of the following…

I have completed the translation of the following language:
LocaleLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/: Pashto
WP Local: ps
GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org.: ps
Web: https://ps.wordpress.org/

Can i please get an admin access to WP Rossetta portal as the current page has too many translation errors, i have tried to contact the current admin but i haven’t got any response back. currently i do have validatorValidator See translation editor. privileges on that portal but that does not allow me to edit any of the contents.

Your help in this regard would be extremely appreciated.

Regards,
M Sadat

#pashto-language, #request, #rosetta, #translation

Notes from the polyglots chats on Jan 14th an Jan 15th

LocaleLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ stats

We got 11 localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ updated to 4.1 last week!
We now have 50 locales that are up to date.
Ten are still behind one major version so I’ll write a post on make/p2p2 "p2" is the name of the theme that blogs at make.wordpress.org use (and o2 is the accompanying plugin). When asked to post something "on the p2" by a member of the Polyglots team, that usually means you're asked to post on the team blog https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/. this week and ask the validators for help
We also added one new locale last week, so say hi to @zayedbaloch who is the new validatorValidator See translation editor. for Balochi

Technical stats/report by @ocean90

  • We used to have over 9,5 million translations, which was a bit too high.
  • It’s now reduced by 50%, because we had many orphan and broken projects/translation sets
  • 80% were the result of failed branch processes, so nothing is lost
  • The new number is about 4,5 million. We should notice a small performance increase. Maybe.
  • Local details pages are fixed, issues like missing projects are gone now.
  • “Sub-sets”, formal/informal translation sets, now have its own details page, for example https://translate.wordpress.org/languages/de
  • We now also have natural sorting for WordPress/BuddyPress sub projects: https://translate.wordpress.org/projects/wp (left sidebar)
  • The “New to translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins.?” message is now (really) stored in a user metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress., just for @sergeybiryukov.

Translation sprints / hack days / contributor days

May be different types of events – support hours and translations sprints. Support hours happen regularly and translation sprints are tied to a release of a WP version or to a specific project – like BuddyPress, bbPressbbPress Free, open source software built on top of WordPress for easily creating forums on sites. https://bbpress.org. or some of the other plugins. Mostly for locales that have already completed WP Dev.

Finding new validators, some simple steps to take:

  • Speak at your local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. about translating WordPress and joining the team
  • Improve your local RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. site
  • Improve docs and getting started guide
  • Orientation for new translators/validators?

 

 

#new-contributors, #rosetta, #stats, #weekly-meeting-notes, #weekly-meetings

WordPress 4.1 instruction manual

WordPress 4.1 instruction manual

Hello polyglots! In the next 3 hours or so, @johnbillion will be starting the release process (in #core in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.). Please make sure you are 100% translated for WordPress 4.1 and all subprojects, and also do not forget about the Akismet project.

I’d expect a release somewhere around 1600 UTC, but for most localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/, the release process is now automated. Please read on.

Part 1, Language Packs

If you are 100% translated at the time of 4.1’s release, a language pack will be generated for you. This is a ZIP file consisting of PO and MO filesMO files MO, or Machine Object is a binary data file that contains object data referenced by a program. It is typically used to translate program code, and may be loaded or imported into the GNU gettext program. This is the format used in a WordPress install. These files are normally located inside .../wp-content/languages/ only, and is used for the language chooser during the install process, and for the language switcher on the settings screen.

If you become 100% translated some time after 4.1’s release, a language pack will be generated for you once the script is run. This will be around every hour.

If you are 100% translated, a language pack has been created, and then you modify a translation to fix a typo or whatever, a language pack will be regenerated for you once the script is run. Please do not do this with unnecessary frequency, as it triggers an update across all WordPress sites.

Part 2, Release Packages — IMPORTANT CHANGES AHEAD

release packageRelease package release package is a packaged version of WordPress. That is, a ZIP file consisting of WordPress in its entirety, along with PO and MO files for core, the PO and MO files of default themes and Akismet, and any custom changes a locale has. In the past, most locales built their release package using the form in Rosetta’s dashboard. is what you’re used to building using the form on RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages.’s dashboard. This is a ZIP file consisting of WordPress in its entirety, along with PO and MO files for coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., the PO and MO files of default themes and Akismet, and any custom changes you have.

Do you have custom changes? For the purposes of this exercise, your localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ falls under one of these four groups:

  • You have never had any custom changes and i18n.svn.wordpress.org is entirely empty for your locale.
  • You have no custom changes for 4.1.
  • You have minor custom changes consisting of, at most, a translated readme, license file, and wp-config-sample.php.
  • You have extensive custom changes consisting of other files, such as wp-content/languages/$locale.php or core modifications.

Here are the details on each:

  • If you have never had any custom changes and i18n.svn.wordpress.org is entirely empty for your locale, you do not need to do anything. Your release package will be created automatically for you. An example locale is en_GB.
  • If you have no custom changes for 4.1, please ensure you have an empty branches/4.1/dist or tags/4.1/dist directory at i18n.svn.wordpress.org. (Having an empty trunk/dist directory does not help you.) You do not need a dist directory if branches/4.1 or tags/4.1 is empty. An example would be nl_NLYour release package will be created automatically for you.
  • If you have minor custom changes consisting of, at most, a translated readme, license file, and wp-config-sample.php, please ensure these files exist in a branches/4.1/dist or tags/4.1/dist directory at i18n.svn.wordpress.org. (Having your stuff in only trunk/dist does not count.) An example would be eo or fr_FRYour release package will be created automatically for you.
  • If you have extensive custom changes consisting of other files, such as wp-content/languages/$locale.php or core modifications, you will need to create a package via Rosetta as you have done in the past. For this, We are phasing out the ability to ship any customizations beyond license, readme, and wp-sample-config.php. This means you need to reach out to the WordPress core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org. to fold your modifications into WordPress core. You can start this process by creating a Trac ticket.

To summarize:

  • If all you have is a license, readme, and wp-config-sample.php (or no custom changes at all), everything will be automated for you for WordPress 4.1 if you follow the instructions above. Both language packs and release packages will automatically be created once 4.1 is announced. If you are not at 100% at that time, then language packs and release packages will be created when you reach 100%. If you are later modify a translation (to fix a typo, for example), your language pack and release package will be regenerated.
  • If you have extensive custom changes, you will need to manually create a package via Rosetta as you have done in the past. This option is being phased out in 2015.

 

If you go to the releases screen on your Rosetta dashboard, you’ll see a new notice that explains what the system thinks your status is. If you have any questions, comments, concerns, or issues, please comment here or find me or @ocean90 in #polyglots on Slack.

If your locale is currently eligible for automatic creation of release packages (which includes being at 100%), you’ll find an RC3 build generated from tags/4.1-RC3 waiting for you on your dashboard. Please inspect these ZIPs. Those locales are: az, bs_BA, de_DE, en_CA, en_GB, eo, fi, fr_FR, it_IT, nb_NO, nl_NL, pt_PT, ro_RO, and sv_SE (zip links).

#4-1, #announcement, #rosetta

There’s been a snafu on Rosetta sites —…

[Updated 9:02 GMT] There’s been a snafu on RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites — I managed to delete the released zip packages for about half of the localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/. There were a few minutes where 4.0.1 was not available to download for some languages, and a few hours where older releases were not available. Everything has been restored from backups. You have nothing to worry about!

#rosetta