HelpHub Localisation Plan

Hi! This is Jon from docs team. This post outlines our plan for localising HelpHub for Rosetta sites. HelpHub is currently live on English wordpress.org site and can be accessed from https://wordpress.org/support/ (e.g. https://wordpress.org/support/category/getting-started/ ).

We’d like Polyglots teamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/.’s input to make this translation as smoothly as possible.

Background

At  WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe (Summit) we discussed the localisationLocalization Localization (sometimes shortened to "l10n") is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local "look-and-feel." of WordPress systems such as DevHub and HelpHub.

We recognised that GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org. was not great for long-form translation and we evaluated the possibility of actually re-engineering GlotPress (or at least translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins.) to work for it. But this is a huge undertaking and it may involve formalisation of the whole of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/’s translation.

So it was indicated it might be best for HelpHub to look at translation out of GlotPress.

Therefore HelpHub was designed as a stand-alone pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that could be activated at numerous places such as RosettaRosetta The code name of the theme for the local WordPress sites (eg. bg.wordpress.org is a “Rosetta” site). All locale specific WordPress sites are referred to as “Rosetta sites.” The name was inspired from the ancient Rosetta Stone, which contained more or less the same text in three different languages. sites.

Plan Phases (Proposal)

Phase 1

Goals

  • Test HelpHub localisation on one localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/’s Rosetta site.
  • Migrate existing English content, but update notification/diff will not be available yet.

Candidate LocalesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/

  • Japanese, since they maintain their own Codex site with a large number of docs
  • French (France), since they want to set up a fr_FR Documentation team (~10 volunteers for the moment)

Process

  1. Activate HelpHub plugin on Rosetta [MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.]
    1. Need Meta help as Rosetta sites are likely on a different network
  2. Migrate English content over (without activating HelpHub’s home interface) [Locale Team]
    1. Explore automated process (but unlikely due to WordPress.org infra)
    2. At this phase, this may need to be a manual process
    3. If manual process, adapt and refine tracking system of migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. designed by Docs Team
  3. Translation by locale team based on English contents [Locale Team]
  4. Possibly re-take related screenshots in locale language [Locale Team]
    1. Create a list of needed screenshots so other locale’s volunteers can contribute as needed
  5. Development work to link English and localised content [Meta]
  6. Define a syndication plan to track updates of the English version and trigger notifications to localisation team [Meta] [Docs]
  7. Activate HelpHub’s home interface on the Rosetta (just this test locale) on /support [Meta]
  8. Adjust the documentation links on the Rosetta site from Codex to HelpHub [Locale Team]
  9. “Push” forums link back to /support/forums [Meta]
  10. Redirect locale’s version of Codex or support materials to locale HelpHub (e.g. https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Help:Redirects) [Locale Team]
  11. Establish communication channel between English HelpHub and locale teams [Docs] [Locale Team]
  12. Write a blog post on the locale news page to announce the move of user support resources [Locale Team]
  13. Do a retrospective and identify pain points [Docs] [Locale Team]
  14. Refine Phase 1 Plan for other locales based on first candidate [Docs]

Phase 2

Goal

Roll out the localisation to more Rosetta sites.

Process

  1. Enable HelpHub plugin on active Rosetta site (individual sign up) [Meta]
    1. What happens to teams without active volunteers? Maybe we’ll show English docs on their site
    2. Explore the possibility of showing machine-translated content
  2. Allow main WordPress.org to reveal that there are other locales’ HelpHubs/Support [Meta]
  3. (To be determined)

+make.wordpress.org/docs

#documentation, #helphub, #rosetta

Polyglots Glossary – let’s gather the terms

We have a Glossary section of the handbook: https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/handbook/glossary/

I need your help with gathering all the terms we need to explain in the glossary, so here goes:

  • Experienced contributors, please add the terms you’re missing in a comment of this post
  • New contributors, please add any term you’re not familiar with you come across – again in a comment here.

#documentation, #glossary, #handbook, #polyglots

Translating documentation

In last week’s Polyglots chat (logs) we briefly discussed translating documentation, how it was done in the past and how it should be done in the light of localizing the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and theme directories and making WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ better fitted for non-English users.

How do we translate documentation now

In the past the Codex has been translated by simply creating new wiki pages and duplicating and translating the content of current pages manually.

The obvious downside of this is that there’s no version control and translators need to check all pages for changes to be able to bring those changes to the translated documents.

Now that Codex is on it’s way to be replaced by the Handbooks, it would be really handy to have those available locally.

So let’s discuss how we can make that happen.

Localizing the handbooks

A couple of options mentioned during the meeting:

“I agree, that it should be handled via WordPress itself, not GlotPress, because you can do quicker previews, add translated screenshots etc. We still can/should show the English text on the same page, maybe side by side so we could track out of date translations.”

  • Adding the handbooks plugin to the localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ sites so editors can build there own handbooks – the easiest way to go, but would have no version control so will basically replicate the old way of copy pasting the Codex with no way to track changes in the original documents
  • Adding the handbooks plugin to the locale sites and including an “Import original content” with an active relation of each duplicate with the original. A way for the editors to pull changes from the original (doesn’t have to be automatic, can be done manually, just as long as editors don’t have to go check every page for changes).
  • One option is something @zodiac1978 pointed out is already being done on wordpress.comWordPress.com An online implementation of WordPress code that lets you immediately access a new WordPress environment to publish your content. WordPress.com is a private company owned by Automattic that hosts the largest multisite in the world. This is arguably the best place to start blogging if you have never touched WordPress before. https://wordpress.com/: “I am doing this for the support pages for wordpress.com. They use a plugin which send you an email for every change (with a revision diff view of the changes). Then we have to manually add these changes to our localised post/page. This could be one way. But much work …”

Let’s discuss the options above and see what ideas the #metai18n team will have too.

Cheers!
Petya

#documentation, #documentation-l10n, #translation

Translating the WordPress Security White Paper

Hey lovely people,

The WordPress Security White Paper has been in the works for some time now, but got officially introduced recently.

The project is open for Pull Requests for translating it on GitHub for anyone interested and already has a pull request for Portuguese.

The white paper is an analysis and explanation of the WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. software development and its related security processes, as well as an examination of the inherent security built directly into the software. It will obviously be highly beneficial for every WordPress business and can be used in evaluating WordPress as a cms. It is also a “best practices guide” for developers.

The text in the white paper (not including the WordPress logo or trademark) is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

If we could join forces and help translate it into all languages WordPress is available in, it would be amazing and highly beneficial for the growing global community.

WordPress Security White Paper | The Project on GitHub

Have a great weekend, everyone!
Petya

#documentation, #security, #translation, #whitepaper, #wordpress