Quarterly Updates | Q1 2021

To keep all aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress volunteer teams, each team’s listed representative has shared an update from the start of the year. Listed below are their top priorities, as well as their biggest Wins and Challenges. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility 

  • Contacted: @ryokuhi
  • Previous Priority: The main focuses of the AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) Team for WordPress 5.6 were:
    • Moving the WordPress Accessibility Coding Standards from WCAGWCAG WCAG is an acronym for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. These guidelines are helping make sure the internet is accessible to all people no matter how they would need to access the internet (screen-reader, keyboard only, etc) https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/. 2.0 to WCAG 2.1 and improving the documentation to include more resources and describe patterns and antipatterns;
    • Making the new default theme (Twenty Twenty-One) ready for WCAG AAA;
    • Creating a feature pluginFeature Plugin A plugin that was created with the intention of eventually being proposed for inclusion in WordPress Core. See Features as Plugins. to add a tool to generate an Accessibility Statement, as was done with Privacy Policy;
    • Checking the accessibility of the new widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. screen in GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/.
  • Priority: The team’s focus is to keep a closer eye on Gutenberg in general and on Full Site Editing in particular and to continue work on documentation and accessible patterns.
  • Challenge: The team continues to be challenged with onboarding new contributors so that more people can be involved and get to actively contribute more quickly. In addition, keeping up to date with Gutenberg development, the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor evolves too quickly for the team to cope with it: dedicating a release to fix its accessibility issues instead of adding new features would probably be beneficial to make it really usable for everyone.
  • Big Wins: The creation of working groups inside the team helped in keeping better track of accessibility issues across the project. The mood of the team is high: the environment has been more welcoming, some new contributors joined the team, and collaboration inside and across teams has improved.

CLI

  • Contacted: @schlessera
  • Previous Priority:  Our goal is to provide automated PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. Compatibility reports for every theme and pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party in the WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ repository and the infrastructure needed to create other types of reports once we have a stable version 1.0 of the Tide APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways..
  • Priority: The team is currently working on getting a release out for the WordPress/Requests library; all necessary changes were completed, and only a few updates to the test suite are missing. This release is the last remaining blocker for WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ 2.5.0, which should be deployedDeploy Launching code from a local development environment to the production web server, so that it's available to visitors. shortly after WordPress/Requests v1.8 is pushed.
  • Big Wins: After a lot of back & forth with the testing pipeline regarding Travis and PHP 8, the CLICLI Command Line Interface. Terminal (Bash) in Mac, Command Prompt in Windows, or WP-CLI for WordPress. team is now at the point where the entire test suite has been redone and ported over to GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Actions (including the automated deployment), and all the bundled packages pass all of their tests successfully for PHP 8.

Community 

  • Contacted: @sippis, @kcristiano
  • Previous Priority: To define 2021 team goals.
  • Priority: Checking in with our Community Deputies and Mentors to see how we can support them and their contributions to the team. Last year the deputy and mentor workload dropped drastically because of event cancellations. That’s why some deputies and mentors might not be up-to-date with all new practices. The Community team is investing in training and activating deputies and mentors to bolster our support of the global community, with an eye towards the end of this year when a larger amount of in-person events are hopefully possible again.
  • Challenges:  
    • We still need to find greater ways to support WordPress contributors, users, and events online.
    • Determining when and how it is safe to return to in-person WordCamps.
    • Getting the team, contributors, and program ready for a greater return of in-person events after a long break.
  • Big win: Finalizing the 2021 WordPress Global Community Sponsorship program, which looks a lot different than usual because the global pandemic affected heavily what we can offer to sponsors.

Core 

  • Contacted: @francina, @audrasjb
  • Previous Priority: Set up and ship WordPress 5.7.
  • Priority:
    • Set up WordPress 5.8 according to FSE go/no-go decision.
    • Ship WordPress 5.7.1, which contains several fixes for 5.7. Set up the next 5.7.x iterations.
    • Find new coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. committers and new component maintainers.
  • Challenge: The team struggles with working with a small number of core committer and component maintainers.
  • Big Win: 
    •  Shipped WordPress 5.7!
    • Week in Core blog posts shows that more and more new contributors are joining.
    • Onboard new core-committers: @davidb, @williampatton, and @clorith commit access was approved by the project lead.

Design 

  • Contacted: @estelaris, @chaion07
  • Previous Priority: The team is focused on moving old TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. tickets and PRs forward.
  • Priority:  To initiate an APAC-Friendly Working Hour.
  • Challenge: The team is catching up with FSE and other relevant components of the releases.
  • Big Win: The Design team’s engagement with new contributors added to the Team for Note-taking and other focuses.

Documentation

  • Contacted: @milana_cap
  • Previous Priority: To develop an overall documentation information architecture; improve discoverability & usability on all documentation; Refine the “getting started” processes (video and text) for onboarding of contributors; apply the external linking policy in Plugin Developer Handbook; Google Season of Docs projects.
  • Priority: Applying a new style guide and external linking policy to existing documentation and improving UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it. for end-user documentation based on new designs. The team is still refining the “getting started” processes (video and text) to onboarding contributors. Finally, we will begin documentation on Full Site Editing as soon as possible.
  • Challenge: Some challenges the team is encountering include: tools and workflows are sometimes not working as expected and sometimes are overwhelming, which requires too much effort for small improvements; collaboration with other teams and keeping up with new features and releases; the pace of making decisions and responsiveness of team members when their action (opinions/comments) on p2 posts is requested.
  • Big Win: The team had a fair amount of wins: Google Season of Docs successfully finished project; Plugin handbook is being reviewed for external linking policy; communication with Full Site Editing team is slowly happening, and new designs for end-user documentation are nearly finished.

Hosting

  • Contacted: @javiercasaras,
  • Previous Priority: Priorities included PHP 8 Compatibility for distributed hosting tests, helping inactive test reporters start reporting again, and improving the process.
  • Priority: The team’s focus is on helping inactive test reporters start reporting again, the first steps towards GitHub Actions. The team is also creating a new format called “WP Hosting Live;” it will be a global meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. group focused on hosting professionals.
  • Big Win: Three big wins for the Hosting team: PHP8 Support for test runner, New Format “WP Hosting Live,” and new Team Reps.

Marketing 

  • Contacted: @webcommsat, @yvettesonneveld, @meher, @maedahbatool, @harryjackson1221, @mikerbg, @OGlekler, @lmurillom, @nalininonstopnewsuk
  • Previous Priority: Continue to support the Learn WordPress resource; assisting Polyglots with materials to encourage and sustain contributions; establish a series of contributor introductory training sessions and ongoing work on contributor event marcomms materials; and training for team members.
  • Priority: The current priority is to continue to support Learn WordPress, Full Site Editing, and WPDiversity initiatives, provide communications support to Community’s newsletters, and plan with Polyglots ways to raise interest and awareness around key mini translation events around a central focus. Ongoing contributor event marcomms and joint working with WCEU and others. Maintaining support for new contributors and inclusion in the team.
  • Challenge: Sustainable contribution at a time of pandemic and its effect, identifying gaps and solutions relating to the role and benefit of marcomms within the project using available tools.
  • Big Win: Developing marcomms strategy and long-term planning for People of WordPress, ongoing internal awareness-raising on FSE and support to release teams, trialing inclusion measures for greater participation and to reduce access barriers, and enabling greater asynchronous contribution.

Meta

  • Contacted: @tellyworth @coffee2code
  • Previous Priority: Focus on handling incoming tickets faster, and maintain the overall level of open tickets.
  • Priority: To focus on handling incoming tickets faster while continuing our recently implemented component-specific focuses and maintaining the overall level of open tickets.
  • Challenge: There are many open tickets, often old, comprising mainly esoteric requests and feature requests for large and medium projects.
  • Big Win: The team updated the handbooks plugin to support importing content from a remote source (e.g., GitHub) and improved support for multi-handbook sites, which facilitated the implementation of the Documentation Style Guide and reorganization of the Block Editor Handbook.

Mobile 

  • Contacted: Yael Rubenstein and @bummytime
  • Previous Priority: Port core blocks to reach 100% coverage on non-FSE blocks.
  • Priority: Mobile is focused on editor onboarding, porting core blocks, block picker improvements, dual-licensing Gutenberg to increase adoption and contributions, basic Global Styles Support, and adding the ability to add block patterns.
  • Challenge: Fixing regressions, some projects turned out more technically challenging than originally thought.
  • Big Win: Audio block support.

Polyglots 

  • Contacted: @nao, @ocean90, @casiepa, @tobifjellner, @evarlese
  • Previous Priority: The team’s current priority is to help identify struggles for contributors and work on resources or tooling to streamline the workload for under-resourced teams.
  • Priority: We’ve published Polyglots TeamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/. Plans for 2021 with three focus areas (improving translator/editor communication, promoting team growth, and clarifying the translation approval process).
  • Challenge: 
    • The organizational structure of translation/adaptation for HelpHub, Learn, Marketing needs to be better clarified.
    • We have a high number of pending requests for new locales that need to be vetted and acted upon.
  • Big win: 75 locale packages released for WP 5.7, +18 since the last report, largely thanks to the adjustment in translation requirements for core language packs.

Security

  • Contacted: @whyisjake
  • Previous Priority: The security team is preparing for a pending security release. There is ongoing work related to migrating older branches of WordPress to Github actions for automated testing, as Travis is no longer available. The team also has a proposal out to drop support for older versions of WordPress.
  • Priority: Right now, the team is shifting the release process to have a central person that manages all of the minor releases for each major version of WordPress; see more here. After completing the work to get automated testing working on each version of WordPress, all the way back to 3.7, we can now confidently release those versions with full test coverage.
  • Challenge: Working with security reporters on deadlines for known issues.
  • Big Win: @peterwilsoncc wrangling the 5.7 minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality. process!

Support 

  • Contacted: @Clorith
  • Previous Priority: To land actionable plans for forums landing page (done :tada:).
  • Priority:
    • To prepare for the site editing experience and expected increase in questions post-update relating to this specifically.
    • Improve the available controls for various user groups on the forums.
  • Challenge: Site editing preparations are not always easy before the feature is finalized. Maintaining the momentum of enhancements landing for support-related tickets outside of metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. focus sprints.
  • Big Win: Meta teams focused development time helped landed a lot of support-related tickets during Q1

Themes

  • Contacted: @williampatton @kafleg @acosmin @acalfieri @aristath @poena
  • Previous Priority: Helping theme authors transition to more block-based themes.
  • Priority: Helping theme authors transition to more block-based themes.
  • Challenge: Making the changes according to plan and reduce the theme requirements.
  • Big Win: The team has an actionable plan for the future, a better meta environment to test on.

Tide 

  • Contacted: @derekherman, @jeffpaul
  • Previous Priority:  Our goal is to provide automated PHP Compatibility reports for every theme and plugin in the WordPress.org repository and the infrastructure needed to create other types of reports once we have a stable version 1.0 of the Tide API.
  • Priority: The team’s current goal is to finish documentation and testing of Tide refactoring to Node and integration with PHP Compatibility Checker plugin.
  • Challenge: There are a limited number of contributors with Golang experience to help with refactoring out of Golang to Node, but post-refactoring, the hope is more will be able to contribute with the codebase in Node.
  • Big Win: Partnership with WP Engine to help integrate refactored Tide endpoints to PHP Compatibility Checker plugin.

Training

  • Contacted: @courane01 and @azhiyadev
  • Previous Priority: The team introduced a sprint approach for 2021. Priorities for the first sprint included revising all team procedures/handbooks as a solid foundation, documenting how brands are represented on Learn, and evaluating options for slide presentations.
  • Priority: 
    • Brand guidelines and options for slide presentations as well as those identified in our April sprint.
    • A high-level curriculum roadmap encompassing programming languages and build tools for those wishing to pursue WordPress-related development. This will help plan ongoing training materials on Learn. 
  • Challenge: Personal issues and the pandemic have impacted the resources available this quarter to get the brand guidelines and tool for slides presentation drafted for discussion amongst the wider community. The team has done work on this and hopes to conclude this coming quarter as we have a lot of lesson plans that could be published once this has been agreed upon.
  • Big win: 
    • Introduced monthly sprints in March.
    • Updated the Training handbook and will continue to work on our procedure for getting lesson plans onto Learn WordPress.
    • Learn WordPress handbook has also been published, led by the Community team with input from the Training team. Both handbooks will continue to progress as we improve the way that we work.
    • Worked with the Community to establish a Learn Working Group.

Triage 

  • Contacted: Jonathan Desrosiers (@desrosj) & Sergey Biryukov (@sergey)
  • Previous Priority: Limit the total number of tickets in Trac, and ensure that every ticket is accurate and actionable. 
  • Priority: Continue to bring the total number of tickets in Trac down to a more reasonable number and/or ensure that every ticket is accurate and actionable (especially really old and really new tickets).
  • Challenge: The main team members have had their resources consumed by a combination of various active roles in recent releases, overarching project tasks (migrating automated testing to GitHub Actions, etc.), and new contributor mentoring. An additional challenge has been striking the right balance between documentation (to better allow other contributors with much less time to contribute to the overall goal) and action (performing triage efforts ourselves).

TV

  • Contacted: @nishasingh, @casiepa, @rahuldsarker
  • Priority: Collection of the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. videos from organizers for publication and to correct the speaker’s name and tags of submitted/ published videos. 
  • Previous Priority: Collection of the WordCamp videos from organizers for publication and to correct the speaker’s name and tags of submitted/ published videos.
  • Challenge: The lack of volunteers who can work with us is a present challenge.
  • Big Win: The team submitting subtitles for videos.

With thanks to team reps for their quarterly updates.

#community

Care and influence: a theory about the WordPress community

Many people find that the structure of the WordPress community is ambiguous. While there are Team Handbooks that address contributors, the way different groups influence and support each other can be unclear. The duty of care is the responsibility of one group to avoid decisions that harm another group in an organization.

I learned about this interesting progression of care and influence recently from Josepha Haden, and wanted to share what I thought was a brilliant way to communicate this. She explained it to me and a group of other contributors, by showing us this flow. 

Like all great sticky notes, there is no clarity without explanation. I would like to shed some light on my understanding of how the WordPress community works, and see if these ideas resonate for other people, the way they did for me.

The five sticky notes above are the 5 groups of people within the WordPress ecosystem.

  • Visitors
  • Users
  • Extenders
  • Contributors
  • Leaders

Duty of Care

Examining the graphic below, the duty of care from the left extends to all groups to that particular group’s right. For example, an extender exhibits a duty of care toward both the users and the visitors while a user’s duty of care is primarily toward just their visitors.

Levels of Influence

Each group directly influences those adjacent to it via feedback loops and meeting their needs. Groups to the left influence groups to the right, while feedback from the right directs what is needed from groups to the left. 

For example, a WordPress user is affected by both visitors and extenders. Imagine a content creator that shares their passion for photography through a WordPress website. This photographer may have visitors that need to purchase photos. In response, the user now has a need to make it possible for visitors to purchase photos on a site. 

  1. The extenders build the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that supports the need.
  2. The user installs it on their site.
  3. The visitors can now purchase photos. 

The groups

Visitors

Visitors are the people that arrive at a WordPress site to gain information or engage in an activity. These people may not be aware of the groups, or even that they’re using WordPress, but they do care about their task at hand. Their needs can directly influence the user’s website.

Users

Users are people who use WordPress as their CMS. These range from website builders, to website designers, to small businesses, or content creators. They are affected by their visitors, and care about what happens when people visit their site. Users are also affected by the extenders, who build things that add new functionality to WordPress.

Extenders

Extenders include those who extend WordPress through the creation of themes, plugins, blocks, and more. They are also people who teach WordPress to others through WordPress podcasts, newsletters, and tutorials. The WordPress ecosystem is enriched by a large number of extenders. 

The extenders are affected by both the users and the contributors. Users determine the value of their plugins and themes. Contributors directly impact their work by creating/maintaining the CMS and providing ways to distribute quality extensions, like the plugin or theme repositories. Extenders also care not only for the users, but also about the users’ visitors. Extenders know their product’s success relies on both the WordPress user and the website visitor. Extenders also benefit from the success of the WordPress platform.

Contributors

Contributors are the people who contribute to the open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. software (OSS) and the infrastructure that supports the project. These include WordPress.org contributor teams and other volunteers who give their time to the project itself and not necessarily just the extended ecosystem.

Contributors are affected by both the extenders and project leadership. The extenders’ needs are often considered by the contributors, for example with regards to backward compatibility and enabling 3rd party integrations. Project leadership influences the contributors by communicating  vision and future goals for the project.

The contributors make decisions that demonstrate their care for each group to their right: the extenders, the users, and the visitors. If they did not care about the visitor, they would build software that would not help users meet their goals. If they did not care about the user, they would build software that lacked an ecosystem, because no one would use it. If they did not care about extenders, they would not build an extensibleExtensible This is the ability to add additional functionality to the code. Plugins extend the WordPress core software. product.

Leaders

Leadership is a very small group. It includes currently Matt Mullenweg (Project Lead) and Josepha Haden (Executive Director). These two help drive the vision and strategy for WordPress.

They both are directly affected by contributors, because the contributors are the people building and maintaining WordPress, and the community surrounding it. Project leadership relies heavily on the ability and skills of the contributors to ensure the project’s goals are met.

Project leadership carries a duty of care that encompasses every level of WordPress. They work hard to avoid decisions that explicitly harm the other groups. No doubt there will be people who will be affected negatively by a decision, but the decisions at this level are made to support and benefit the majority.

Moving through the groups

Because these group relationships can be ambiguous, it is often unclear how people move between them. In fact, moving between the groups often happens unintentionally, and as the result of expressing more care toward people within one’s own group.

One example is the move from extender to contributor. An extender primarily cares for their own extension product (ie. a plugin), which benefits their users and visitors. At some point, an extender might run into an issue, or innovate on a solution, that can help all extenders. By sharing this solution with contributors and helping to implement it, the extender contributes to the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. software, resulting in a better experience for all other extenders. Their level of care expands through their desire to contribute in a way that benefits others.

Users often become extenders when they can not find the extension that suits their needs. The user, when a solution is not provided by existing extenders, might decide to create their own extension (ie. a plugin) to meet their need. When the user shares their product, they have just become an extender, and their level of care expands to include all other users who might find their product a necessary solution for their own sites.

Overall, WordPress group dynamics generally depend upon the duty of care and levels of influence. The more one cares about other groups, and those in one’s own group, the more likely that person will influence the community in a positive way.

Acknowledgements

Thank you to @chanthaboune @andreamiddleton for their feedback on the content and phrasing of this post!


Feedback

What do you think about this theory of how different parts of the WordPress ecosystem connect and relate to each other? Does this description sound mostly right to you, or do you have an experience or perspective that conflicts with this set of ideas? I’d love to know your thoughts!

#community

Community Team update – 18-07-2019

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from July 18 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC.

Deputy updates

As usual, Community Team members are busy doing MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. application vetting, having organiser orientations, mentoring, organising events, replying to Help Scout tickets and helping organisers in general. Team and it’s members have no blockers with their work,

Ongoing discussions

WordCamp PWA Retrospective
Leading up to WordCamp Europe, the organising team enchanted the wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ to be progressive web applicationProgressive Web Application A standard website that's been enhanced with features to make it faster and feel more like a native mobile application. Learn more. (PWA). The PWA was deployedDeploy Launching code from a local development environment to the production web server, so that it's available to visitors. right before WordCamp Europe 2019 and was tweaked during the event. Key feature of this version was offline mode and custom “Day of event” frontpage that showed real-time schedule to visitors. We are now gathering feedback how PWA development process went.

Proposal: QR code for WordCamp badges
@casiepa has put together proposal on adding QR codes to WordCamp badges. Proposal is to send QR code to attendee after buying the ticket. That would make checking the attendee as arrived whole lot easier, allow easy on-site badge printing, t-shirt size check and possibly printing the code to badge for sponsors to scan. Discussion about this proposal is ongoing in the post comments.

Announcement: guidelines for using Trello
Community Team started a test phase for using TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. to organise its “big picture” work as a tool for general project management. The test phase will continue to the end of 2019 and team will evaluate pros and cons at the end of the year.

Call for volunteers: Handbook Working Group
Community Team started efforts to audit, rework and move content from P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. to our handbooks. @francinca has posted about forming working group and invitation to volunteer in it is open.

Numbers

For a long time, Community Team didn’t provide numbers from its work. This update is to change it.

Numbers below are for two weeks before the Community Team meeting on 18-07-2019, as team meetings are bi-weekly and that sets the reporting interim to two weeks. In next update, our numbers will also indicate the change.

#community, #community-team +make.wordpress.org/community

Community Team Update – 11 July 2019

Thanks to @sippis for getting us back in gear with posting Community Team updates on here – he put this post together, but doesn’t yet have author permissions on this P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/., so I’m the one publishing it.

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from July 4: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy updates:

We are busy bees as usual 🐝

Community Team members have done MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. vetting, organiser orientations, mentoring, organising events, replying to HelpScout tickets. No blockers. For future updates, we plan on providing actual numbers for these items.

Ongoing dicsussions:

WordCamp Europe 2019 – Recap of Community Team Activities At Contributor Day + Plans for the Future
We made a lot of progress in Berlin – how do we keep the momentum going? We don’t want things to die after Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.. We talked about how our team needs a bit more steering and tools for long-term project management and settled giving a TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. a real try. @francina and @sippis are working with getting started with Trello.

How can we better reach our community organizers
There have been some concerns raised with staying in touch with our community organizers, specifically meetup organizers. How to better reach our community organizers, not just with the survey, but the monthly meetup newsletters?

Additional posts worth highlighting:

WordCamp Asia:

@nao is writing a post about the vision for WordCamp Asia and it’s coming soon. During the writing of that, it has been recognised that our WordCamp handbooks do not cover all the details or work well for regional WordCamps. Maybe worth making some documentation targeted for regional WordCamps? Could WCEU handbook be used as a base?

Diverse Speaker Training group:

Held first training of the reboot of the group last week, and is going to start doing 1-2 a month for the next few months before ramping up. Working group is starting to translate their content with the help of Polyglots teamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/., they are also improving their workshop materials and internal processes.

Chat recaps and make/updates:

We discussed how our team has failed to provide chat recaps and updates to make/updates P2 and how to revitalize that. We agreed that updates should be made after every team chat. That means bi-weekly updates consisting of team chat recaps and also some other important details about how our team is doing.

For the first three months, @sippis and @hlashbrooke are responsible for making the updates here. After that, we are going to shift the responsibility to two other Community Team members for the next three months. Responsibility is intended to be rotating thing every three months with two persons, so we can be sure that someone will do the updates.

Updates will also contain some numbers from the Community Team. @sippis is working with boilerplate to speed up making update posts.

Team reps:

We haven’t changed our team reps for a long time. @kcristiano is going to write a post about starting the process for team repTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts. change.

#community

Community Team Chats – January 17 2019

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from January 17: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

Veeting, orienting, mentoring, organising. Everyone is busy, as usual and there are no blockers.

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Call for Volunteers: Kids Events Working Group

A new working group will start meeting to help WordCamps organise Kids Workshops by producing material readily available for local organisers. The group is going to have a call soon, if you are interested follow the post.

Meetup organizer newsletter suggestions for January 2019

As always we are looking for ideas to add to our monthly newsletter, if you want to highlight somethine please get in touch.

Paid Freelance Contributors: The idea of the Wapuu Program

We didn’t actually discuss this topic during the call, but there is a lively, ongoing and very interesting conversation going on in the comments. Please join in!

Who is going to WordCamp Nordic?

The team needs facilitators for the Community Table at Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.. At least four experienced deputies will be there, so table is covered.

Community Summit in 2019?

The last Community Summit was in 2017, before WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe.

Historically, Community Summit happens when we have problems that we can’t solve online. The event, as we’ve done it in the past, requires an invitation-only format, which introduces a pretty toxic element into our egalitarian and highly open group. It is traumatic to organize an invitation-only event in the WordPress project.

But what if we could re-imagine it as an event for vision and community building? Getting feedback first from the community is key.
We plan on postig in the Community blog ans start with some basic questions: “What does community summit mean to you? should we do one/do we need it? how should we handle invite-based or should it be done in a new way?”

Highlighted P2 posts

All deputies are invited to read the posts to keep up to date with the Community team and project activities, thanks!

#community, #community-team

Community Team Chats – December 20 2018

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from November 15: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

Everyone is busy with the end of year. No blockers.

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Chat scheduling over End of Year Holidays

Proposed to skip the first chat of 2019, since it’s during Christmas holidays for a large part of Contributors. We will start again on January 17.

WordCamp US 2018 Contributor Day Recap

The recap has all the details of the projects we worked on at WCUS. No discussion needed, but if someone wants to adopt a project and go on with it, please pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” us in the Community Events channel and we will help you get started!

WordPress Governance Project Chats

During WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US, a discussion was started about creating a Governance Project for WordPress. The team behind it asked to hold the chat in the Community Team channels. Initially we said yes, but upon further discussion it was decided to move it to another Slack instance, since this is not an officially sanctioned WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ project.

During the 20:00 UTC there was a lively discussion about Governance and the project itself, so if you are interested in knowing more start reading from here.

Highlighted P2 posts

WordCamp camera kit program discussion wrap up

Thanks for commenting and volunteering to send camera kits and make the experience better for the WordCamp organisers.

Open Floor

We have a big backlog of MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. applications, we are constantly struggling to keep afloat. If you are a trained deputy and you can help, please do!

#community, #community-team

Community Team Chats – December 6 2018

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from December 06: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

Everyone is busy and with WCUS coming up some of us are busier than ever. No blockers. And not a lot of partecipation on this chat since a lot of people were at WCUS and on the same day WordPress 5.0 was launched! Live! From Nashville!

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Proposal to Increase the Total Expense per attendee
No discussion was held and there are few comments, will continue exploring options.

Discussion: Should we continue the WordCamp camera kit program?
Discussion was mostly held via comments on the post, resulting in a wrap up post with all the details on how to continue.

Meetup organizer newsletter suggestions for December
Thanks to all the people the commented.

Highlighted P2 posts

WCUS 2018 is here! Community Team Plans for Contributor Day
Will you attend WCUS Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.? In person or via Slack? Here is what we aim to work on.

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: November 2018
While we prepare December newsletter, catchup with November’s edition

WordCamp Incubator 2018 Update Thread: November edition
Updates on the Incubator program.

#community, #community-team

Community Team Chats – November 15 2018

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from November 15: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

Everyone is busy and with WCUS coming up some of us are busier than ever. No blockers.

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

WordCamp US 2018 – Get Involved Table

As always we are going to have a Get Involved table at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US. Thank you to the wonderful people that volunteered to staff it.

WordCamp Blocks: Round 1 Designs

The first round of designs is here! People offered to help and design is undergoing.

Discussion: Logos in WordCamp Videos

Quite a few people commented, so we reached a decision.

Sponsor logos at the venue (banners, podium, etc.) that are captured on video are fine to leave in and we don’t need to make a rule that organisers must remove banners from the stage.

Speakers are allowed to include their company logo in their slides, but only in an optional opening/closing informational slide and not throughout the presentation. This is fine even if their company is not a sponsor of the event.

Similarly, a speaker can wear clothing with their company logo on it, even if their company is not a sponsor.

No company logos of any kind are to be added in post-production.

Proposed 2019 Global Community Sponsorship Program

The Global Community Sponsorship working group has made a proposal, we gathered some comments and held office hours for companies that were considering becoming global sponsors. The new program and the sponsors have been announced on the Community Blog.

Highlighted P2 posts

Increase in WordCamp maximum ticket price for 2019

After a thoughtful discussion earlier this year, from 2019 the maximum ticket price for WordCamps will be $25/pp/day: this is the maximum price and organisers can charge less.

Reminder: Over the years we’ve kept allowing costs to rise for events as the economy dictates. This ticket cost is us catching up to what folks are spending. Not an indicator that we should spend more 🙂

WordCamp Incubator 2018 Update Thread: October edition

If you want to know more about how the Incubator Program read the comments!

#community, #community-team

Community Team Chats – November 01 2018

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from November 1st: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

Everyone is busy and with WCUS coming up some of us are busier than ever. No blockers.

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Should WordCamp Websites Publish Sponsor-Provided Content?

The idea is to get the info from the community that might help us form a strategy around the issue. So far we have collected important feedback, comments are still open if you want to weigh in! As a reminder, we’re a consensus-seeking group, but not consensus-dependent.

WordCamp US 2018 – Community Team Plans – Will you be there? Is there something that you would like to work on (listed or not?) Please let us know!

Managing Online Classes – The Diversity Outreach Training team is looking for input on tools. They are looking for a more automated system for people to sign up for our classes and then receive reminders. Do you know of a tool that can help with that? Comment on the post!

Progressive Web App for WordCamps – Expanding the scope of the PWA created for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe 2018. What features should be there? We depend on our diverse team to help us identify all sorts of use cases!

There is an ongoing series about transforming WordCamp website shortcodes into GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ blocks, and we are collecting feedback:

Highlighted P2 posts

Open Floor

We held our first WordCamp organisers chat on October 25th. It would be great to have it twice a month, so we can accomodate different timezones.

You can read the recap of the chat here and in the next few days a call for volunteers will go out, to find organisers for the Americas-friendly chat.

The UK community have started a sustainability document with ideas of how to improve sustainability at WordCamps and meetups, they will share their working document with us on the Community blog.

#community, #community-team

Community Team Chats – October 18 2018

(Note: We made it! This is the last chat we had in the backlog and now the Community Team is all caught up with recaps.)

The Community Team meets twice a month, first and third Thursday, at two different times to cover different timezones.

Agenda and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. logs from October 18th: 11:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC

Deputy Check-in

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Should WordCamp Websites Publish Sponsor-Provided Content?

The post was published after last month discussion. There are quite a lot of comments right now, with different points of view. We discussed this at length also during the chat but we haven’t reached a conclusion yet. Main points brought up:

  • Sponsors want ROI and branded content could help out
  • Added burden for organisers in terms of editorial control
  • Sponsor interviews instead of sponsored posts
  • We should have guidelines and make this absolutely optional
  • We all want to set up sponsors for success, and content that seems like “paid content” isn’t going to help them (or WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more.) much at all
  • We could write a page for sponsors, to help them understand what kind of approach is most effective with our audience
  • People might think less of the event because of the sponsored posts

Conversation is ongoing if you want to add your opinion!

Meetup organizer newsletter suggestions for October?

We are accepting ideas for what should go in the next newsletter for MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organisers. One point raised: content shouldn’t be behind a wall (no need to sign-up to get the content).

WordCamp US 2018 – Community Team Plans

We are less than two months away from WordCamp US: what should the team work on in Nashville? Let us know 🙂

Converting WordCamp Shortcodes to Gutenberg Blocks 

With the imminent release of GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/, the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. WordCamp team is planning to convert the WordCamp shortcodes into blocks and we need WordCamp organisers feedback!

Call for Volunteers: 2019 Global Sponsorship Working Group

It’s that time of the year! We are working on the new package for Global Sponsors. People were asked if they wanted to volunteer for this and we now have a team who is working on assessing the situation and propose changes, if needed. It’s a fun group full of spreadsheets and speculation 🙂

Contributor Day Handbook

If you have any ideas how we can make this better, please reply to the thread. 

How can we handle toxic community members.

A group is working on the Community Code of Conduct and it will also address unacceptable behaviour in the online space. It was remarked though that toxicity can be very pervasive without breaking any rules.

One resource that can be helpful if folks are struggling with conflict in their communities: https://everydayfeminism.com/2015/01/guide-to-calling-in/

Drupal Community Governance Initiative

Is this something we should explore in WordPress?

Highlighted P2 posts

Announcement: monthly chat for WordCamp organisers

Bulk Ticket Purchasing

#community, #community-team