WordPress.org

Theme Review Team

Welcome to the Theme Review team.

We are a group of volunteers who review and approve themes submitted to be included in the official WordPress Theme directory.

The Theme Review team maintains the official Theme Review Requirements, the Theme Unit Test Data, and the Theme Check Plugin.

We also engage and educate the WordPress Theme community regarding best practices for themes.

Interested in joining the Theme Reviewers team?

Great! The team is open to anyone who wants to help out, and the process is simple. To find out more just visit the Join The Team page.

Want to know more? There is a more information in the Theme Review Team’s Handbook and the Review itself.

Once you get a theme to review, you will also get a mentor to help you on the road to becoming a theme reviewer.

Weekly meetings

We use Slack for real-time communication. As contributors live all over the world, there are discussions happening at all hours of the day.

We have a project meeting every Tuesday at 18:00 UTC in the #themereview channel on Slack. The next one will be at Tuesday at 18:00 UTC.

Recent Updates Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Jose Castaneda 8:56 pm on August 23, 2016 Permalink |  

    Meeting summary 2016-23-08 

    Items discussed

    Closing tickets should be done for 5 or more distinct issues. Examples:

    • Theme has multiple places where text strings are not translatable – group these into 1 distinct issue
    • Using custom functions instead of core functions such as the_posts_pagination, the_archive_title, the_excerpt – group into 1 issue

    When closing a ticket, please be sure to use something a long the lines of the following. We don’t want to close tickets, rather we want to encourage growth and knowledge for the author.

    As part of the new theme directory guidelines, reviewers are now allowed to close tickets if a theme has 5 or more issues.  You can read more about this change here: [https://make.wordpress.org/themes].
    
    Don't get discouraged a closed ticket is not the end.  We want you to resubmit your theme.  We do ask that you spend a bit more time making sure that your theme meets all the requirements before we make it live. [https://make.wordpress.org/themes/handbook/review/required/]
    
    If you need help with anything or want me to explain further, don't hesitate to post here in this ticket.  I'm happy to answer any questions you have.  Or, feel free to post over on our [https://make.wordpress.org/chat/ Slack] [https://wordpress.slack.com/messages/themereview channel]."
    
     
    • Turker YILDIRIM 11:12 pm on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      May be it’d be better to send an email to all authors about this change before taking any action.

    • Jose Castaneda 11:53 pm on August 26, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Something I’ve been thinking about is the predefined response we use. I do like it but it can be something we can iterate and make a little better:

      I am sorry but because the following five errors are present I am closing this ticket.

      • #issue1
      • #issue2
      • #issue3
      • #issue4
      • #issue5

      Do not get discouraged a closed ticket is not the end. We want you to resubmit your theme. We do ask that you spend a bit more time making sure that your theme meets all [https://make.wordpress.org/themes/handbook/review/required/ the requirements] before we make it live.

      If you need help with anything or want me to explain further, don’t hesitate to post here in this ticket. I’m happy to answer any questions you have. Or, feel free to post over on our [https://make.wordpress.org/chat/ Slack] [https://wordpress.slack.com/messages/themereview channel].

  • Ulrich 11:32 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink |  

    Agenda for 2016 August 23 

    The Theme Review Team holds a meeting weekly and we encourage all members to attend.

    Channel: #themereview | Time: Tuesday at 18:00 UTC 18:00 UTC

    The meetings typically last 30 minutes. If time permits, additional topics may be discussed.

    If you have any topics, then please reply to this post and include the topic, along with a brief description of what you would like to discuss.

     
    • Jose Castaneda 11:37 pm on August 20, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The multiple screenshots was mentioned in Slack ( https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/themereview/p1471619247003107 ) and in core’s post ( https://make.wordpress.org/core/2016/08/17/wordpress-4-7-whats-on-your-mind/ ). Both @grapplerulrich and I both mentioned it on there.

      I think we can get at least some ideas together by Tuesday. I agree with @celloexpressions in that the bigger question is:

      https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/themereview/p1471653541003154
      I think the biggest question is what multiple screenshots should show

    • Nilambar Sharma 12:46 am on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I have seen some Github issues with tag decision needed. If time allows, we can discuss those also.

      https://github.com/WPTRT/WordPress-Coding-Standards/issues?q=is%3Aissue+is%3Aopen+label%3A%22decision+needed%22

    • ThinkUpThemes 8:23 am on August 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I personally am not a big fan of imposing a restriction on uploads per theme author. I think it’s another attempt to tackle the issue of long queue, without tackling the underlying cause of the problem. The problem is that many authors submit themes that are far from meeting the required standards.

      I’d like to see more focus on how we can educate authors to develop to the required standards. One of the best ways is to review, but obviously we can’t force authors to review real themes as this will result in poor reviews. My idea is that we require new authors to review the “doing it wrong” theme before submitting a theme. How we go about implementing this, I don’t know just yet.

      If we are to implement a restriction on uploads per author. I’d like to see a staggered approach moving towards the ultimate restriction of 1. So for example, start at 3 (average of TF’s), then see it’s effectiveness after 6 months and adjust accordingly at that time (possibly to 1).

      If we start the restriction by imposing it at 1 theme per author, then we don’t have any leeway to tighten it up further in future.

    • Rinku Y 4:45 am on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Author upload limit 1 is very good idea !! if author has submitted a theme, he need to wait for it to become live or close. this will decrease queue and also will very much helpful for new theme author. Next time author will not make same mistakes.

    • Edward Caissie 1:18 pm on August 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If I’m understanding the upload limit premise it is mostly directed at new theme authors (possibly new themes) more so than anything else and from that perspective I can understand a limitation; but, if it is directed at theme authors in general I do not … for those theme authors that have multiple active/live themes in the repository they have likely gone through the review process at least a few times and as such should be familiar with the guidelines.

      If themes existing themes (current/”known” theme authors) are being affected by this restriction then it could become something very detrimental and I would not recommend it.

      Given these ideas, is it possible to implement this idea so that it only affects “new” authors and/or “new” themes but does not affect any theme updates?

    • Carolina Nymark 7:19 am on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If there is time, can we discuss the suggestion about closing tickets with 5 errors?

  • Justin Tadlock 6:50 pm on July 26, 2016 Permalink |  

    Meeting notes for 2016 July 26 

    We had a solid discussion based on this week’s agenda.

    Read the meeting transcript in the Slack archives. (A Slack account is required)

    Removing exception to hardcoded scripts guideline

    The first item was to discuss the removal of an exception to one of our existing guidelines when WordPress 4.6 is released:

    No hard coding of scripts and styles unless a browser workaround script.

    We will no longer be allowing browser workaround scripts to be hardcoded. The new guideline would be rewritten to become:

    No hard coding of scripts and styles.

    The reason to remove the exception is because WordPress has the wp_script_add_data() function for handling this. When WP 4.6 rolls out, that’ll be more than 3 versions for back-compatibility.

    So, it’s time to update your code if you have any hardcoded scripts remaining. You can find an example in the TwentySixteen theme.

    UX considerations for the feature filter

    @celloexpressions brought up the idea of making the “subjects” in the feature filter a drop-down. We’d like to see user testing and give time for the new subjects list to be used first.

    In our next tags iteration (next January), we want to consider overall improvements to the entire feature filter box and what can be done to make this better for users.

    Adding the review baseline to the handbook

    @sakinshrestha is getting his first project as a key reviewer.

    He’ll begin work on adding the review baseline to the handbook. This is to make sure theme authors are aware of how our new review flow works.

     
  • Ulrich 6:58 am on July 25, 2016 Permalink |  

    Agenda for 2016 July 26 

    The Theme Review Team holds a meeting weekly and we encourage all members to attend.

    Channel: #themereview | Time: Tuesday at 18:00 UTC 18:00 UTC

    Topic : Open discussion

    • We currently have an exception for enqueuing browser workaround script. Since WordPress 4.2, wp_script_add_data() exists, and browser workaround scripts now can be enqueued (see TwentySixteen). I would like to remove this exception once WordPress 4.6 is released which is planned for the middle of August.

    No hard coding of scripts and styles unless a browser workaround script.

    The meetings typically last 30 minutes. If time permits, additional topics may be discussed.

    If you have any topics, then please reply to this post and include the topic, along with a brief description of what you would like to discuss.

     
  • Ulrich 8:56 am on July 19, 2016 Permalink |  

    Agenda for 2016 July 19 

    The Theme Review Team holds a meeting weekly and we encourage all members to attend.

    Channel: #themereview | Time: Tuesday at 18:00 UTC 18:00 UTC

    Topic : Open discussion

    The meetings typically last 30 minutes. If time permits, additional topics may be discussed.

    If you have any topics, then please reply to this post and include the topic, along with a brief description of what you would like to discuss.

     
    • Rinku Y 3:52 pm on July 19, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      We have more new themes but less reviewer. now new theme need to wait for 5-6 moths to get start for review.

    • madriverweb 7:53 pm on July 19, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Topic: Making WordPress.org as easy a choice as WordPress.com, Squarespace, Wix or Weebly. Background: I am a web developer who also hosts about 100 accounts, some of which use WordPress. Problems:
      1. Many of my clients have a preconceived idea that WordPress is harder to use than other platforms.
      2. With a setup that includes only the latest “twenty…” themes, they are either dependent on a web developer or have to browse an overwhelming number of themes knowing they are still only seeing a fraction of those available, without even getting into paid themes.
      3. There are already WAY too many themes. Why not make it easier for the less skilled web developer or the end user to create their own theme by pulling in functionality modules?
      4. My own review of themes over the years has proven frustrating. Searching by functionality yields either an unknown number or none too frequently. Many do not even specify functionality in the description, focusing on colors and other stuff that can already be seen. The description or keywords can’t be seen until clicking. In my opinion, the number of widgets, and how many are in areas other than the sidebar is the most important piece of information.
      5. Functionality should not be included in the customizer since the theme needs to be downloaded anyway. Just switch between themes to evaluate and get rid of that small piece of real estate that duplicates existing functionality or plug-ins and overrides desired CSS in many cases.
      6. A few more “most popular” themes of different varieties should be included so we hosts have the ability to capture that business.

      • Ulrich 9:48 pm on July 19, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The theme review team is not really the correct place to discuss such a topic. It is also a very large topic.
        Let me still reply to a few of your points.
        2. We want to improve the search of themes and we have started to do so with the inclusion of new tags to filter by in WP 4.6
        3. There are a number of resources that people starting out can use like the underscores themes or they can reply on plugins for certain functionality.
        4. Some of this will be worked on with the new tags. We will discuss new tags in January. You should join the discussion then. This is also something the theme authors can work on.
        6. I know a number of hosts who include their own themes so it is possible. I am sure there is a way for you to automatically install themes on your clients installation.

        • madriverweb 6:59 pm on July 20, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Thank you for the reply, some good points. I will research #3 and 6 in more detail. I knew this was not the best place to post this, but don’t know where is more appropriate for anyone to listen. Again, I can’t stress enough how easy it is to lose clients and prospects to more “friendly” platforms. So I figure the more places I say it, it might get back to those at WordPress who can do something about it. We recently had Chris Christoff from WordPress Core at our Burlington VT WordPress meetup group. When I asked for what audience WordPress.org and themes were being designed, he responded the person with the least computer skills, newbie. If we are losing people because other platforms offer a reasonable number of prettier standard themes and drag and drop functionality, we either need to make a related change or start marketing to a slightly more savvy audience.

          • Ulrich 7:43 am on July 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Up to today Matt has been the person who has chosen the default themes. Twenty Sixteen was not included by default in the installation and needed to downloaded separately.

            I have not used any of the other services so it is difficult to get a full idea of the flexibility that they offer. There are a large number of page builder plugins out there.

            I like some of the default themes for their simplicity. By reducing the number of options make this situation less overwhelming. Are the newbie users able to make the correct decisions even when they don’t have the experience and knowledge.

            One place where WordPress excels is when a site has been set up it quite easy for users to use to publish their content.

      • Ulrich 9:41 am on July 23, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

    • madriverweb 10:41 pm on July 25, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks, very interesting. I will follow that post and connect with her.

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