Theme Review update for May 22, 2017

Currently

  • 153 new tickets are waiting for review.
    • 50 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 100 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 124 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 142 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 51 tickets are assigned to 39 reviewers.
    • 51 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 54 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 56 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 56 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 74 are approved but are waiting to be made live.

In the past 7 days

  • 182 tickets were opened
  • 181 tickets were closed:
    • 141 tickets were made live.
      • 14 new Themes were made live.
      • 127 Theme updates were made live.
      • 6 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
    • 40 tickets were not-approved.
    • 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

#themes, #trt

Plugin Review Team – May 22

Plugin Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 128
  • Plugins rejected : 48
  • Plugins closed : N/A
  • Plugins approved : 55

After some trial and error, I figured out a better formula for calculating how many are approved. Previously I was only taking into consideration the current week.

The abnormal number of rejection comes from 14 plugins that were submitted, approved, and then determined to have an undesired slug. In order to mitigate this in the future, we’ll be emailing the default slug with directions NOT to resubmit if it’s incorrect, but to email us.

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending) : 294
  • → (older than 7 days ago) : 195
  • → (2017-05-15 – 2017-05-22) : 88
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet) : 44
  • → (pending; replied to) : 250

SupportPress Queue Stats

  • Total open tickets : 24
  • → (with no activity in last 7 days) : 1
  • Within defined 7 day time window:
    • Total : 274
    • Closed : 261
    • Open : 13

#plugins

WordPress.tv Moderator Update May 19, 2017

“A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell too much on the future.”
―Albert Einstein


WordCamps submitting videos for modding or editing:

WC Bordeaux – WC MiamiWC  MadridWC  BerlinWC  San Diego  – WC Barcelona – WC  Kansas City – WC Pune – WC Seattle


The Modchat on Slack


Anyone anytime can take a video to edit.
Post-Production Videos-to-Edit


In The Last 7 Days
94 videos were published from
12 WordCamps and WordPress Related Event around the world


WordPress Community Interview Series

With Dave Navarro


The Top Five Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Gabrielle Denis : Comment animer un blog d’entreprise ?

Matt Mullenweg: State Of The Word 2016

Rebecca Haden : Content, WordPress, and SEO

Nancy Thanki: Let’s Encrypt! Wait. How? Why?

Troy Dean: Seven Figures From Scratch – How I Used The Internet (and WordPress) To Build a Seven-Figure a Year Business With No Money In The Bank

#wordpress-tv

Polyglots team update – May 17, 2017

Meeting headlines

The following topics were discussed in the weekly meetings (6am and 10am UTC)

  • 4.8 Beta 1 and 4.7.5 releases
  • Get Involved flyer and banner
  • Security Whitepaper translation
  • Global WordPress Translation Day 3 – Call for organizers and videos from GWTD2

Full report available on https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/2017/05/19/notes-from-the-polyglots-chat-on-may-17th/

Statistics

Releases: 169 (±0) locale, 68 (±0) up to date, 27 (±0) behind by minor versions, 0 (±0) behind by one major version, 14 (±0) behind more than one major version, 51 (±0) have site but never released, 9 (±0) have no site.

Translations: 169 (±0) total, 65 (-1) at 100%, 7 (+2) over 95%, 4 (-1) over 90%, 27 (±0) over 50%, 58 (±0) below 50%, 105 (±0) have a language pack generated, 8 (±0) have no project.

Requests: There are 31 unresolved editor requests out of 776 (+16) total and 4 unresolved locale requests out of 48 (-1) total.

Translators: There are 402 (-4) GTE, 1 548 (+42) PTE and 13 255 (-874) translation contributors. (A wordpress.org account could have multiple roles over different locale)

Site language: 49,682% (+0,062%) of WordPress sites are running a translated WordPress site.

#polyglots

Proposal: WordPress Community Conduct Project

In 2012 a Code of Conduct was introduced for official WordPress events to make WordCamps safer and more inclusive. It is now applied to all WordCamps worldwide and anyone who attends a WordCamp automatically agrees to it.

Since the Code of Conduct was first introduced, the community has grown and diversified.

At the 2015 Community Summit, a group discussed expanding the scope of the WordCamp Code of Conduct to apply to the WordPress community as a whole. Work on such a Community Code of Conduct has been ongoing since early 2013, and a ticket was created in 2015, but no finalized version has ever been presented to the community and ratified.

The WordCamp Code of Conduct has been active for 5 years as a tool to promote the safety and inclusion of all community members at WordCamps world wide. The Community Conduct Project aims to expand the scope of the Code of Conduct to promote the same values of safety and inclusion in all official community spaces including WordCamps, WordPress Meetups, official fora and websites including comment sections, and official chat channels (specifically Slack and IRC).

Proposal

Everything needs a starting point, so this began as a proposal by Jenny Wong and Morten Rand-Hendriksen, and reviewed by various community members.

We would like to now take this opportunity to share this project proposal with you all, the amazing WordPress community.

We propose a new Community Conduct Project to update the WordCamp Code of Conduct and expand its scope to become a WordPress Community Code of Conduct (CCoC).

The Project has two main goals:

a) Create a CCoC, to be posted on WordPress.org, promoting safety and inclusion for all community members in community spaces,

and

b) create a system for reporting, handling, and resolution of CCoC-related issues as they arise.

To meet these goals, several questions need to be answered including:

  • Who can be called a “WordPress Community Member”?
  • In what spaces does the CCoC apply?
  • Under what circumstances can a person be considered to be acting as a community member?
  • What values and ideals would a CCOC protect?
  • Based on these values and ideals, what is the baseline assumption a person can expect whilst being in a WP space.
  • What spaces, physical or virtual, are considered “community spaces” in which all members can be expected to promote and/or adhere to these values and ideals and any agreed upon community guidelines derived from them?

The answers to these questions will help inform the process of drafting a new CCoC, a system for reporting, handling, and resolving issues, which will become the enforcement procedures based on WordPress community values.

The work will be done in three phases:

  • Phase 1: Community review and input on the existing Code of Conduct including a survey for the community to participate in.
  • Phase 2: Review and categorize feedback.
  • Phase 3: Draft a revised Code of Conduct based on feedback from Phases 1 and 2.

The first task of the project will be to gather data about the current Code of Conduct. As a starting point, we have prepared a draft for a survey to be discussed by the group at the first meeting. This survey will be published publicly to learn more about how the current CoC is used in the real world.

Join In

Any and all community members are encouraged to provide input and/or join the project, no previous skills or experience required. In particular, we are seeking diverse voices so if you identify as a member of a diverse, underrepresented, or marginalized group you are encouraged to join.

All meetings will be conducted in the #community-team Slack channel, and minutes published on the Make Community blog to ensure full transparency using the tag CCOC. Working documents will be available for review by the community throughout the project and these will be linked at the end of each post.

If you or someone you know are interested in contributing to this project, please leave a comment below providing a rough ideal time in UTC format, which timezone you are based in and join the #community-team channel. Before scheduling a regular meeting time, we will review the ideal times and timezones of interested community members, to ensure everyone can take part.

Thanks for reading  <3

#ccoc, #proposal

Support Team Meeting Updates for May 18th

Items covered at today’s Support Team Meeting:

  • Announcements
  • WordPress 4.7.5
  • WordPress 4.8 Beta 1
  • Handling Security Vulnerability Questions
  • Checkin with International Support Liaisons

Read the Make/Support blog post for more details.

#support

Support Team Meeting Updates for May 11th

Items covered at today’s Support Team Meeting:

  • Announcements
  • WordPress 4.7.4
  • Checkin with International Support Liaisons

Read the Make/Support blog post for more details.

#support

Theme Review update for May 15, 2017

Currently

  • 147 new tickets are waiting for review.
    • 48 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 106 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 123 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 135 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 58 tickets are assigned to 49 reviewers.
    • 53 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 55 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 57 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 58 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 74 are approved but are waiting to be made live.

In the past 7 days

  • 153 tickets were opened
  • 177 tickets were closed:
    • 122 tickets were made live.
      • 15 new Themes were made live.
      • 107 Theme updates were made live.
      • 9 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
    • 52 tickets were not-approved.
    • 3 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

#themes, #trt

Plugin Review Team Update – May 15

Status

There was an SVN ‘glitch’ this week. Two actually. Basically the SVN pushes worked, but they didn’t update the front-end of WP or the API properly. As a reminder when this happens the worst thing to do is try pushing your code over and over. It generates a backlog which makes any delays take longer. We counsel patience, young padwans.

Plugin Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 149
  • Plugins rejected : 27
  • Plugins closed : N/A
  • Plugins approved : 72

Reminder: Rejected and Approved statuses are manually calculated at this time.

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending) : 245
  • → (older than 7 days ago) : 175
  • → (2017-05-08 – 2017-05-15) : 50
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet) : 20
  • → (pending; replied to) : 225

SupportPress Queue Stats

  • Total open tickets : 23
  • → (with no activity in last 7 days) : 2
  • Within defined 7 day time window:
    • Total : 316
    • Closed : 315
    • Open : 1

#plugins

Plugin Review Update – May 8

Plugin Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 114
  • Plugins rejected : 28
  • Plugins closed : N/A
  • Plugins approved : 27

Note: Rejected and Approved are manually calculated. The numbers look low, but when compared to last year, it appears that May is always a dip low.

It’s important to note that there is a direct correlation between the lower submissions and our lower rejections. We no longer reject after 7 days which means our pending number goes up, but the total submissions drops. People don’t have to resubmit, basically.

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending) : 227
  • → (older than 7 days ago) : 147
  • → (2017-05-01 – 2017-05-08) : 59
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet) : 22
  • → (pending; replied to) : 205

SupportPress Queue Stats

  • Total open tickets : 23
  • → (with no activity in last 7 days) : 1
  • Within defined 7 day time window:
    • Total : 251
    • Closed : 247
    • Open : 4

#plugins