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Make WordPress Community

Welcome to the official blog of the community/outreach team for the WordPress open source project!

This team oversees official events, mentorship programs, diversity initiatives, contributor outreach, and other ways of growing our community.

If you love WordPress and want to help us do these things, join in!

Getting Involved

We use this blog for status reports, project announcements, and the occasional policy debate. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to comment on posts and join the discussion.

You can learn about our current activities on the Team Projects page. There projects are suitable for everyone from newcomers to WordPress community elders.

You can use our contact form to volunteer for one of our projects.

Communication

In addition to discussions on this blog, we have Office Hours four times a week in the #community-events channel on Slack for real-time communication. Office hours for the next week are scheduled for Monday 22:00 UTC 2016, Tuesday 13:00 UTC 2016, Wednesday 22:00 UTC 2016, and Thursday 13:00 UTC 2016 in the #community-events channel on Slack.

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  • Hugh Lashbrooke 12:52 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink |  
    Categories: Community Management ( 180 )

    How about a new support desk? 

    As all of our community team members and deputies will be aware, we are currently using SupportPress to power our support desk and handle all of the emails sent to support [at] wordcamp [dot] org. This includes any custom emails, as well as organiser applications (for meetups & WordCamps), meetup venue requests, budget submissions, and absolutely everything else that involves direct communication between the community team and our organisers.

    As everyone who uses this platform will also be aware, SupportPress has some limitations in terms of what it is capable of, and it requires fairly regular maintenance in order for it to continue running as we need it to. All this to say that, while it works for our needs, it could definitely be a lot better and make our community management a lot more efficient.

    There have been a number of reasons why we have remained with SupportPress for so long, but suffice it to say that the time has now come to move on to something more suited to the needs of our ever-growing community. With more organisers coming on board every month, which brings along with it a much higher volume of communications coming through SupportPress, we need to switch to something that will help us serve the broader community more effectively and more efficiently.

    With that in mind, I have been looking into some options for an alternative support desk for the team to use. I’m not going to go into all the details of each platform that I looked at (as that would make for a very long post and I’m sure many of you are already familiar with most of the options), but I will list them all here to show that I have done the due diligence before coming to any kind of conclusions.

    What all of these options do have in common, however, are a number of incredibly useful features that will make all of our lives a lot easier:

    • Tickets can be assigned to individuals
    • Notes appear in chronological order with the rest of the ticket replies
    • We can reply to tickets via email
    • Ticket search is much more robust
    • Full-featured macros are much more effective then simple predefs
    • Notifications from tickets are far more helpful
    • Much easier ticket management
    • Good-looking UI
    • Numerous service integrations (like Slack, for example)
    • Straight forward custom developer integration (for linking tickets up with WordCamp.org data)
    • The ability to scale with us without costing us more
    • A feature set that we will make full use of

    If you’ve ever used any kind of support desk then I’m sure you will have some form of familiarity with most of those concepts.

    So, with all of this in mind, here are the options that I looked at as a replacement for SupportPress (in no particular order):

    • Desk.com
    • Help Scout
    • Zendesk
    • Zoho
    • Freshdesk
    • Kayako
    • Cayzu
    • osTicket

    Based on the above list of criteria, the best options for the needs of the community team seem to be: Help Scout and Zendesk, with the strong front runner being Help Scout. One of the big reasons being that we can use the free plan for Help Scout (and it will scale for our needs), while Zendesk would cost us $5/user/month.

    Deputies, we want to hear from you! If you have any other options for help desk platforms or any other thoughts on what we should be looking for in terms of features, then please comment on here so the entire team can discuss it.

    Pinging a few deputies who are active in SupportPress and thus probably have a stronger opinion than most:

    @kcristiano @miss_jwo @brandondove @_dorsvenabili @roseapplemedia @chanthaboune @mayukojpn @courtneypk @adityakane @andreamiddleton @iandunn @vc27  @gounder @francina @camikaos

     
    • Randy Hicks 1:52 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I don’t personally have experience with any of the suggestions, though the Nashville group gave a thumbs up to Help Scout. Michele Butcher said she has used Hellp Scout for a few organizations and agreed to post her feedback here later today.

      Thanks for putting in the time on this! I’ve not been using supportPress as long as everyone else, but I would welcome a fresh approach 🙂

    • Peter Nemcok 2:31 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      +1

    • gelform 2:35 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I use Help Scout at the free tier with Kanban for WordPress. Straight-forward enough. I only use it to manage the flow of email, tho. I don’t use the dashboard or their docs.

    • kcristiano 2:59 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks @hlashbrooke I agree it is time for a replacement.

      I have heard good things about Help Scout, but never used it. Can we really use the free tier with the number of support reps (deputies) we have?

      SupportPress is so hard to manage and use, time is often lost as there are no notifications when a ticket is replied to. I will be extremely happy with a change for the better.

    • Cami Kaos 6:13 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for all the work you put into this @hlashbrooke! I’ve never used Help Scout but I’ve heard positive things, and given the givens it sounds like a good option for us to try out.

    • slash1andy 7:19 pm on September 30, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’ve never personally used Help Scout, but it comes up extremely frequently as a great option for support teams. I know it’s used by many WordPress companies.

      I do have some really good familiarity with ZenDesk, and I do like it a lot. I think that honestly, it’s not going to offer more than Help Scout for what we are paying.

      Either of the options will offer a huge boost in ease of use and functionality over SupportPress though.

  • Josepha 1:23 am on September 29, 2016 Permalink |  

    WordCamp Status Weekly Report (September 22nd to September 28th) 

    Hello, Community Team! This is a report of all the WordCamp applications that we’ve seen work on this week (from September 22nd to September 28th).

    We saw 19 WordCamps* with activity this week, but there are a little over 50 we haven’t heard from in a while. If your WordCamp isn’t on the list, but you’re still working hard, drop by the weekly update post or leave a comment here so we know you’re still okay!

    1)  8 new applications that need vetting

    • WordCamp Chiclana de la Frontera, Cadiz
    • WordCamp Ciudad de Mexico
    • WordCamp Niagara Falls
    • WordCamp Vienna, Austria (x2)
    • WordCamp Portland, Maine USA (x3)
    • WordCamp Hyderabad, Telangana, India
    • WordCamp Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
    • WordCamp New York City

    2) 1 applicant asked to build their local community

    • WordCamp Westlands, Nairobi, Kenya

    3) 1 applicant that needs an orientation/interview

    • WordCamp Lublin, Poland

    4) 3 WordCamps moved to pre-planning (sent agreement and signed, site created, templates, etc.)

    • WordCamp Alicante
    • WordCamp Edinburgh, Scotland
    • WordCamp Orange County

    5) 0 WordCamps that need a budget review

    6) 1 WordCamp (with approved budget) awaiting contracts

    • WordCamp Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    7) 0 WordCamps that need a signed contract

    8) 0 WordCamps waiting on Central Listing information

    9) 0 WordCamps published to the schedule

    10) 6 WordCamps needing debrief

    • WordCamp Kyiv
    • WordCamp Raleigh
    • WordCamp Sydney
    • WordCamp Bhopal
    • WordCamp Dallas/Fort Worth
    • WordCamp Rio de Janeiro

    If you have questions (or your WordCamp is missing) let us know in the comments!

    * This includes some communities that sent multiple applications.

     
  • WordCamp.org 4:00 am on September 26, 2016 Permalink |  

    Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

    Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

     
  • Andrea Middleton 8:08 pm on September 23, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: Community Management ( 180 ), WordCamps ( 148 )

    Sponsorship and Finances Report for September 23 

    Here’s that weekly biweekly update on the payments and income for WordPress community events that we post on Fridays. This report might get more elaborate as we get the time to build more tools around financial reporting (currently it’s quite manual), so if there’s a level of detail we’re not providing that you’d like to see, please mention it in the comments!

    Between September 9 and September 22, here’s what came in:

    Ticket revenue via PayPal: $42,862.62 USD (1,194 total tickets )
    Sponsorship income via wire transfer: $18,888.66 USD
    Sponsorship income via check: $113,743.38 USD
    Sponsorship income via PayPal: $33,713.62 USD

    Total revenue (in USD): $209,208.28

    As for invoicing in this period:

    We sent 70 invoices to local sponsors.
    Of those, 32 invoices have been paid, and 38 invoices are still outstanding.

    And in this same period, here’s what went out:

    Total number of vendor payments/reimbursements: 59

    Total payments (in USD): $90,263.96

    Global Sponsorship Grants that were set in this period:

    None in these weeks!

    As always, if you have any questions, please ask away in the comments!

     
  • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 3:45 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags: , suggestion   

    Proposal: WordCamp Slack 

    I sent this in as a feedback and was asked to post it here for everyone to weigh in on.

    I was talking to people about the multiple slack community we have to join for WordCamps. While this is primarily an issue for people (like me) who attend/volunteer at multiple camps, having to join many independent slack channels is confusing, onerous, and annoying as we have to reset our preferences over and over. Setting TFA on a new slack is not super simple. Also there’s a concern about legitimacy (is this the REAL WordCamp group etc etc).

    I understand there’s an issue with the number of channels on WordPress.slack.com, so my suggestion is to use wordcamp.slack.com!

    Then you can add groups like #nyc and #nycorganizers and so on. And make the admins of the community team admins so they can spin up new groups as needed, private or not, and so on. If there was a serious concern about years, you could make nyc2107 and so on, though in a perfect world it wouldn’t be needed.

    The only ‘hard’ part would be making sure only organizers have access to a private channel, but then again, this would allow for oversight to make sure no one who shouldn’t have access has access.

     
    • kcristiano 3:48 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think this would be a wonderful improvement and encourage communication between WordCamps. +1 and then some.

      • Mikel King 4:31 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Simple intra-WordCamp communications would be awesome!

        double +1

      • Ibon Azkoitia 9:10 am on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I have one other thing, did you think about the cost?

        • If the WordCamp Slack it’s free = we are going to hit the 10.000 very soon, so bad thing or really organizing things
        • If the WCSlack it’s paid = it’s going to be very very expensive

        It’s something to take in account.

    • Ibon Azkoitia 4:15 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The idea is good… but (hehe sorry there is always a but): taking in count that WordCamps are local events, and that WordCamps are organized by existing local communities… it’s not more logical that local communities have it in their own Slack?

      In WordPress Bilbao we have our own Slack so we organize everything from there and it’s much easier for members so they don’t have to create/join/change Slack just for 1 event/year. And the attendees that join “just” for the WordCamp then they are already in the local community Slack for the future.

      And also can be done in the Country Community Slack. In WordPress Spain we have an Slack account with channels for local communities. This way people from that Slack can see what’s happening around WordCamps in country level. We have a #wordcamp channel for it and prepare travels and accommodation together.

      The major problem is that people that it’s not so involved in the community have difficulties to join one (WPBilbao) or maybe two (WPSpain) Slacks. Ask them to join a third one (wordcamp.slack.com) it would be too much (not counting the fourth one wordpress.slack.com)

      Maybe in USA it’s normal for WordPress users and WordCamp attendees to join the WordPress.slack.com but here, in Spain, few Spanish members are in there.

      Summary:

      • For organizers its okey that Slack account, because we are used to it
      • For normal attendees it’s quite difficult to ask them to join more slacks and, in that case, just for 1 event/year

      About the communication between WordCamps that @kcristiano speaks about, I was speaking with Jenny about it and I will post one idea about it (maybe later now that I’m already here :P) The general idea is to put in contact different WordCamps/Meetups organizers all hover the world for Skype speed meetings about what they do in their communities and how they solve problems.

      • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 4:27 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Asking people to join a third slack is actually the problem I’m trying to solve here 🙂 Because it’s annoying and while I CAN do it easily, it’s not enjoyable and it can be a hassle depending on how the Slack is configured.

        I’m used to opening a new Slack account, but that doesn’t mean I like it. What if the slack changes from year to year? I’ve joined WordCampYEAR.slack.com before. That’s silly. Why would we make a slack for a year, and then in another year have to spin it all back up again? What if we just had it forever. wordcamp.slack.com/Bilbao and wordcamp.slack.com/spain – Now if you move from Bilbao to Toldeo, you don’t need another slack and another Two Factor setup and another configuration to your ‘do not disturb hours’ and so on and so forth 🙂 You’ve made life easier for everyone.

    • Mikel King 4:30 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      +1

      From my (former lead organizer) perspective this would make things a lot easier. I’m currently in 5 slacks and having a single WordCamp slack just screams smart money to me.

      • Ibon Azkoitia 5:14 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Your suggestion is this:

        • Create a WordCamp Slack for every attendee of the WordCamp

        But:

        • 90% of the attendees, in the Spanish WordCamps, are local members or living near the WordCamp
        • From that 90% just 10% are in a WordPress Slack

        In numbers of WCBilbao16:

        Attendees = 156
        Attendees in WPBilbao Slack + WPSpain Slack = 30 (more or less)

        So you want to create a Slack for, in this case, 30 people (and from them I think that not everyone will join that Slack having the WPSpain Slack for the country WordCamps).

        We have to think about the real attendees and what they do, not for us that we are Slack “heavy users” (WP slacks, company slacks, etc.)

        Great for trying it, and maybe in USA that it’s so big with so much WordCamps and people works fine. But I don’t see more than 30 people from the WPSpain Community there, because they have the WPSpain Slack were they are already doing that.

        PD: just see what’s the role of people commenting here, I think that most of these people are organizers and that’s why they like the idea. There will be no casual attendees (90% of the WordCamp attendees) here commenting.

        • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 5:53 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          > From that 90% just 10% are in a WordPress Slack

          and

          > But I don’t see more than 30 people from the WPSpain Community there

          I don’t understand why that’s a problem. This would open the WPSpain organizing committee to have readier access to volunteers and admins from around the world.

          I’m not proposing this for the casual attendees

          This is only for organizers, volunteers, and speakers. Wouldn’t it be easier to, say, ask Cami or Jenny to come to a specific Slack room to help with a crisis that it would be asking them to email, reply, or join a new slack altogether? They’d already be there! 🙂

          • Ibon Azkoitia 6:55 pm on September 21, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Ok, so you propose this Slack just for Organizers and volunteers. And taking in account that WordCamps are local events, no world wide events with volunteers and admins from around the world (not at least in Spain).

            So, continuing from that point and putting WCBilbao as an example:

            • The organizing team of WCBilbao has a channel in WPBilbao Slack
            • Volunteers, at least here, are 99% from Bilbao Community are in WPBilbao Slack

            So you want that ALL this people move to that new Slack just for in case they need help.

            It’s not easier that:

            • If someone has a question enters the wordpress.slack.com (and it’s probable they are already there)
            • Ask the question in #community-events
            • All the events community it’s already there

            In your idea each WordCamp has his own channel, so if they have a question they have to ask Cami or Jenny to enter that particular channel. But in my example, if you ask in wordpress.slack.com there is more people to answer.

            Even further, new WordCamps organizers (at least in Spain) are helped and answered in the WPSpain slack from the rest of organizers. So they nearly don’t even need to ask in wordpress.slack.com

            And with another Slack now you will “force” Cami, Jenny, etc. to be in 2 slacks to answer questions.

            But it’s okey it seems maybe its really needed for some communities.

            We don’t loose anything trying it! 🙂

            Thanks for the discussion!

    • Ulrich 12:11 am on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The solution may be having a national wordpress slack like a number of other communities has done.

    • Jon Brown 7:42 am on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Mixed feelings on this…

      FIrst, having just spent a week in Tokyo (sorry, not rubbing it in) and all the english speakers there using a Facebook group to chat all week about where to meet up and where to go, I totally see the NEED for a communication channel for WordCamps.

      However there are few concerns:
      1. Making WordPress is such a huge community the Slack app tends to crash a lot, so I put it in it’s own Nativifier wrapper (props Jason Cosper for the tip), it remains to be seen of the new (beta) Electron based Slack app is better. Why does this matter? because a WordCamp Slack would potentially have even more users than the core Slack.

      2. Yet another team? I’m not sure that’s better than just pushing more people into Making WordPress. The issue really is probably attendees that don’t _use Slack_, not just attendees not in the Making WordPress slack.

      I do like the point about avoiding channel overload in Making WordPress though…

      • Jon Brown 7:43 am on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        oh… one other point. I’m fine caling it WordCamp Slack, but would it be for ALL WordPress events, or just WordCamps? (ie. meetups and one-offs like BeachPress/SnowPress/CaboPress/etc… )

        • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 5:13 pm on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I was only thinking for official WordPress WordCamps, with the intent of “For organizers, volunteers, speakers, and such.” Not general attendees. Though if they wanted to…

          Issue #1 is why I said wordcamp.slack.com and NOT rooms in WordPress 🙂 Smaller, less likely to crash on iPhones 😉

          Issue #2 is the one I’m trying to solve with this. ONE team for ALL WordCamps 🙂

    • Aditya Kane 6:21 am on September 23, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I really like this idea on some level because of transparency and efficiency.
      I understand this would be really useful and save some the trouble of being on multiple slack teams. I think it works for communities that have a year specific slack team for WordCamp.

      But, I know in many local communities the slack teams are not just WordCamp centric. In Mumbai and Pune, the Slack teams have not just used Slack to discuss WordCamps – but also local meet ups, workshops and sometimes projects.

      Moving communications to a centralised WordCamp Slack team sounds a bit counter-productive in such cases.

      One rule could be that only WordCamp related things are discussed at this proposed slack group – but I am sure that won’t be the case. So I am sure local meet ups and other local events or projects will eventually be discussed and this Slack group will not be WordCamp only.

    • Andrea Middleton 8:03 pm on September 23, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I love the idea of getting us to all talk together more, but I have deep reservations about using a wordcamp.slack.com to do so. 🙂 Here are my concerns:

      1. If we’re going to provide an official channel, we have to police that channel… and we don’t have the people to moderate 110+ slack channels. Maybe we could recruit folks to do that, but candidly we’re having a hard enough time recruiting and training WordCamp mentors, let alone Slack moderators.
      2. Scale. If we keep to a free account, we’ll use up that 10k recent messages/5GB of storage pretty quickly, probably before the first year is over. This means that local communities won’t be able to access last years’ messages, and archiving info about decisions made is one of the best things about this idea. If we pay for an account, assuming each camp has 5 organizers on the team (and usually it’s more like 8), we’re talking about $36,000 per year for the Standard Plan.
      3. The WordPress Community Team is a part of the WordPress open source project, and I like having all our organizers on the WordPress open source project’s Slack instance. It keeps us closer to the overall project, and (I hope) by proximity helps encourage our contributors to contribute to and/or communicate more with other teams on the project. If we silo off all our organizers to a separate instance, I think it sends a message that we’re not as closely connected to the project itself.
  • WordCamp.org 4:00 am on September 19, 2016 Permalink |  

    Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

    Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

     
  • DeveloperWil 1:33 pm on September 16, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: WordCamps ( 148 )

    CampTix Sent Ticket & Receipt is confusing attendees 

    Hi all

    I have a couple of observations about CampTix that I’d like to share with the team.

    This is the first year we have used CampTix for WordCamp Sydney and we have received quite a lot of queries from attendees asking 1) can we send them a proper invoice? and 2) where is my ticket?

    1) There are no tax or currency on this receipt and the title of the email is “Your ticket to WordCamp Sydney 2016”. It’s not very intuitive that this is an invoice and not very helpful for claiming tax back as a business expense. It looks more like a payment notification. Perhaps the design could be tweaked to make it look more like an invoice.

    There is also no way to regenerate this email if say the email gets intercepted by spam filters and the recipient never gets it. We tell them to login to their PayPal account and print the transaction but I’m sure it would be super easy to add a button to resend receipt/invoice.

    2) where is my ticket?
    The email’s title is “Your Ticket to WordCamp Sydney 2016”, however the body of the email looks more like a notification of purchase rather than a ticket.

    We’ve had about 60 people saying that their ticket was not emailed, only to figure out that they didn’t realise that email was their ticket.

    It could be due to the fact we’ve use eventbrite in the past which emails attendees something that looks like a conference ticket that they can print out and bring with them (name, event title, date, ticket type etc).

    I’m sure the CampTix email could be designed better to make it look like an actual ticket.

    Thoughts?

    Cheerz,
    Wil.

     
    • Ian Dunn 3:56 pm on September 29, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hey Wil, sorry this fell through the cracks.

      1) There are no tax or currency on this receipt and the title of the email is “Your ticket to WordCamp Sydney 2016”. It’s not very intuitive that this is an invoice and not very helpful for claiming tax back as a business expense. It looks more like a payment notification. Perhaps the design could be tweaked to make it look more like an invoice.

      The e-mail isn’t intended to be an official invoice, at least not in the way that many countries use that term. There are some discussions about sending complete invoices, though:

      There is also no way to regenerate this email if say the email gets intercepted by spam filters and the recipient never gets it. We tell them to login to their PayPal account and print the transaction but I’m sure it would be super easy to add a button to resend receipt/invoice.

      That’s currently being worked on:

      2) where is my ticket? The email’s title is “Your Ticket to WordCamp Sydney 2016”, however the body of the email looks more like a notification of purchase rather than a ticket.

      It’s not intended to be used as a physical ticket. I think most camps just let people in if they say they bought a ticket. The number of people that lie in order to gain free attendance will be so small that its insignificant, if there even are any. I personally wouldn’t worry about it. That also has the side-effect of speeding up the registration lines.

  • WordCamp.org 4:00 am on September 12, 2016 Permalink |  

    Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

    Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

     
  • Andrea Middleton 3:05 am on September 10, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: Community Management ( 180 )

    Sponsorship and Finances Report for September 9 

    Here’s that weekly biweekly update on the payments and income for WordPress community events that we post on Fridays. This report might get more elaborate as we get the time to build more tools around financial reporting (currently it’s quite manual), so if there’s a level of detail we’re not providing that you’d like to see, please mention it in the comments!

    Between August 26 and September 8, here’s what came in:

    Ticket revenue via PayPal: $50,872.56 USD (1,331 total tickets )
    Sponsorship income via wire transfer: $108,557.33 USD
    Sponsorship income via check: $65,000.00 USD
    Sponsorship income via PayPal: $22,005.66 USD

    Total revenue (in USD): $246,435.55

    As for invoicing in this period:

    We sent 67 invoices to local sponsors.
    Of those, 28 invoices have been paid, and 39 invoices are still outstanding.

    And in this same period, here’s what went out:

    Total number of vendor payments/reimbursements: 52

    Total payments (in USD): $111,933.25

    Global Sponsorship Grants that were set in this period:

    Udaipur: 100,000 INR

    As always, if you have any questions, please ask away in the comments!

     
  • Josepha 11:22 pm on September 8, 2016 Permalink |  
    Categories: WordCamps ( 148 )

    Automated Speaker Submission Post Issues 

    We’ve made an update to the logged-out experience that WordCamp speakers have on the automated speaker submission post. It has been the case up to this point that if you were logged out, you were unable to see the form, let alone fill it out and submit it. While we do want speakers to log in to submit the form (so we can tie that activity to their profile), a form should at least be visible so everyone knows that they are in the right place.

    The form is now visible whether you are signed in to WordPress.org or not. If you are not signed in, then you are presented with a modal over the form that gives you some next steps.

    Please use the improved page and leave feedback here!

    Thank you to everyone who has reported this problem in the past, and to Marc Benzakein who most recently reported it in Slack.

     
    • kdrewien 11:42 pm on September 8, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yippee ki-yay!!

    • Ian Dunn 3:30 pm on September 9, 2016 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      One thing that can be confusing is that you need to sign in to WordCamp.org, not WordPress.org. Being signed in to WordPress.org does not automatically sign you in to WordCamp.org.

      However, you do use your WordPress.org username/password when logging in to WordCamp.org.

      I modified the language on the site the other week to help clarify that, but figured I’d mention it here too.

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