Community Team Reps for 2020

Now that voting for this year’s Community Team reps has concluded, I’m pleased to announce that the new Community Team reps for 2020 are Mary Job (@mariaojob) and Cami Kaos (@camikaos)!

Mary Job

Mary hails from Lagos, Nigeria. She started using WordPress about 7 years ago, and has been involved in organising her local WordPress community meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. group since 2016. Not only that, but she has been the primary catalyst for the explosive growth of WordPress community events all across Nigeria, offering countless hours of ongoing support to local organisers. She has also spoken at a number of WordCamps around the world and has served as a community deputy since 2017. Mary brings a passion and fervour to her work on the Community Team that is matched by few others. You can read more about her journey with tech and WordPress on HeroPress and her profile page.

Cami Kaos

Cami needs no introduction to those who have been involved in WordPress community events program for a while. A resident of Portland, OR, Cami has served as an integral member of the WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. team since 2013 where she has assisted hundreds, if not thousands, of local organisers in bringing their event ideas to life. While she has been such an active member of the team for so many years, it is very exciting to now have her serving in the role of Community Team repTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts. so she can bring her trademark insight, understanding, and wisdom to new areas of the team. You can read more about Cami’s journey on HeroPress and her profile page.

From myself and @francina (the outgoing Community Team reps), we’re excited to see these two wonderful women step up to their new role and are looking forward to a fruitful and productive year ahead for the team!

How to contribute to the Global Community Team

These are some of the different options for getting involved with the WordPress Global Community Team 🙂

1) The best way to start is by organizing Meetups and/or WordCamps in your city. If you feel like you can represent WordPress, follow the code of conduct for WordPress events, and follow the five good-faith rules for WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers, then you can apply to join the program: 

  1. a) Check if there is a WordPress Meetup group in your city – if there is one, join it, attend the events, and step up by either helping the organizers or becoming an organizer yourself!
  2. b) Check if there is a WordCamp in your area – you can attend, apply to speak, volunteer, sponsor and/or help organize your local WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more.!
  3. c) If there is not an existing WordPress Meetup group (or if there is an inactive group) in your town/city and you want to start one, you can apply here – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

2) If you already have experience organizing a successful WordCamp and have an availability of 2-3 hours a month, you can apply to become a WordCamp mentor here: – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

3) If you have had at least 1 year of experience as a Meetup organizer and/or have been a WordCamp lead organizer, you are familiar with the WordPress Open Source project and philosophy, you have at least 2-3 hours a week available for contributing, and you accept our Code of Conduct, you can apply to become a Community Deputy. We are a team of community-minded people around the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and keep things moving at WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each.. You can apply to join the Global Community Team as a deputy here – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

Note: if you have any additional questions, join us in the #community-events channel of Make WordPress Slack, we’ll be happy to help you there!

#contributors

Applying lessons from agile to event organization: the sprint retro

In the last 2 years, I have been diving deep into the practice of agile methodologies, their frameworks and processes. Hindsight being what it is, I often find myself looking back and thinking, “Man, if only I knew then what I know today!” And not only for software delivery, but for my time working as a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer as well.

There is a lot that event organizers can learn from lean and agile beyond the now ubiquitous kanban board, and today I want to share some thoughts and techniques for my favorite of all the agile practices: the sprint retrospective.

At the end of each of the three WCEU organizing years that I participated in (2016-2018), the team, or teams, would hold a “post-mortem” to reflect on all of our successes, learnings and fumbles. Those learnings didn’t often translate into anything actionable, because:

  1. We didn’t have a clear and consistent process
  2. The team had a high turnover rate
  3. Folks switched roles from year to year
  4. At the end of the year we were all exhausted and just ready to move on

Why run a sprint retrospective?

Retros are most effective when they are done at regular intervals while the work is ongoing. They serve as checkpoints to create space for teams to stop, inspect, learn, and adapt. In scrum jargon we call this a sprint retrospective, where a sprint is a predefined and regular interval of time into which project delivery is broken down and delivered. The sprint retro then serves to only look back on that period of time. Typically this is 2 weeks, but 3 and 4-week intervals are also common. (Yes, I do realize that I’m writing this largely to a group of software developers, but I won’t assume everyone reading is familiar with these concepts 🙂)

Am I saying that because we didn’t run regular retros that we never learned on the job and course-corrected when needed? No, of course not! On the contrary, for a huge team of volunteers self-organizing across a dozen countries, we were constantly learning and adapting our work accordingly. We just didn’t have a clear process to do so, which meant that a lot did slip through the cracks, knowledge did get lost, and a lot of things went unsaid. And worst of all, not everyone felt comfortable or safe raising difficult topics and in a timely manner.

Retrospectives serve to:

  • Create a safe, dedicated space to have open, candid conversations
  • Build trust
  • Hold ourselves and one another accountable
  • Celebrate everything we’re doing right
  • Share our learnings
  • Identify things that don’t make sense to us
  • Take an honest look at what’s not going well
  • Come up with creative, tangible solutions toward improvement
  • Define controlled experiments
  • Follow up on action items, experiments and their outcomes in the next iteration

How to run a remote retro

These types of conversations are best had in person, with a big bare wall, a punch of Post-it notes and some Sharpies. But there are lots of great tools and tips for running remote retrospectives as well. Let’s dive in.

Participants

The participants should only include the immediate delivery team. That is, the individuals who are directly collaborating on a daily (or regular) basis. No stakeholders or outside team members should be present, without the express permission of every coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team member. Why? Again, this needs to be a safe place to talk about potentially difficult topics. Folks need to be able to express themselves without fear of judgement or repercussions.

However, sometimes it does make sense to bring in someone to facilitate the meeting, that way all team members can participate. This person should of course be someone that all team members are comfortable with, and someone capable of remaining neutral (more on facilitating below).

Duration

A retro shouldn’t last longer than an hour, although for larger teams, and for end-of-project retros it might make sense to extend this an extra 30m to ensure enough time for discussion.

The acknowledgment

Before kicking off I always mention the following (and include it in written form on the tool being used):

We are having this discussion with the goal in mind of continuous improvement. Regardless of what we discover, we understand and truly believe that everyone did the best job they could, given what was known at the time, their skills and abilities, the resources available, and the situation at-hand.

Hat tip to my colleague Jen Laker for that one. She says that she will refer back to this if the conversation ever starts turning into a blame game – retros aren’t about blaming people or passing the buck. They are about being accountable and learning from our inevitable errors.

I’ve also come to add the following:

If you find yourself struggling to find the right words to say something, that probably means that it’s really important. I encourage you to not worry about getting the phrasing just right. Get it out there first, then we will work through it together as a team.

This came after repeatedly watching people start to type and then erase their words…finding just the right words is not always possible, and not wanting to offend anyone is a real fear. Make it easy for people to voice the hard stuff.

The brainstorm

Now it’s time to get all the ideas out. There are different tools that you can use for this:

  • Google docs (my preferred method)
  • TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing.
  • Confluence (has a built-in template)
  • Miro

Really, any online tool that lets multiple people collaborate simultaneously can serve this purpose. With Trello and Confluence, the prompts are divided into columns. On a Google doc you can create sections with bullet lists.

I find that 7-8 minutes is the right amount of time for this phase.

  • Encourage everyone to contribute at least one item to each column
  • Invite them to mute themselves and to work in silence
  • If you see the activity waning early, you of course don’t need to use the whole allotted time, stop early
  • Give folks a 1 minute warning before the time is up, asking them to wrap it up
  • At the end, ask if anyone needs more time – it should absolutely be ok to spend another minute or two to make sure all of the important stuff gets out there

The formula

There are lots of different ways to frame a retro, the most common, and the one I use most frequently with teams is:

  1. What went well?
  2. What went less well?
  3. What still puzzles me?

And sometimes I add a fourth:

  1. What did I learn?

An alternative to this is:

  1. Start doing
  2. Stop doing
  3. Keep doing

Though I find this lacks the emotional connection that helps foster team building.

For long term projects I like to shake it up from time to time. Two I’ve experimented with, with great results, are The Wish, and The Sailboat.

The vote

This is an optional step. Ideally, when the time intervals aren’t too lengthy or the team too big, the group can get through all of the items in the allotted time. However, if it’s clear that there are too many to get through, then you can take 4-5 minutes and have members upvote the topics that they feel would be the most valuable use of time to discuss.

Grant each person 3-4 votes. They can be added as emojis, and tools like Trello have “like” features that can serve this purpose well. People can place one or more of their votes on individual items, as long as they don’t use more than the defined quantity each. Count the votes and sort topics in each question/column by those with the most votes.

The discussion

I often like to start with what went well as a bit of an ice-breaker. It’s great to look at everything the team is doing well, and this column/section often has the largest quantity of items.

That said, when there are a lot of items in the “went less well” and “puzzles me” columns, then I’ll save the “went wells” until the end. The facilitator should read the room and decide what the best approach is on that particular day.

The facilitator

Right, so yes, someone should facilitate this meeting, and ideally that should be someone who is not also participating. This may not always be possible. The important things for effective facilitation of this meeting:

  • The facilitator is neutral, they are not there to push an agenda
  • They actively create a safe space and ensure that everyone has a voice
  • Respect the timeboxes, and move the conversation along if the group gets stuck on a topic (see below)

Notes, decisions & action items

The facilitator should also capture the output of the discussion. This generally falls into 3 categories:

  1. Notes: general impressions that add value beyond what was captured in the brainstorm items. The development of those topics that add clarity, meaning and different perspectives.
  2. Decisions: has the group agreed to make any process changes? Document these under Decisions, and keep a log to refer back to. Process is specific to each group and it is natural for it to evolve.
  3. Action items: these are clear tasks to be completed and should be immediately assigned to one or more individuals. p2’s have built in checklists that can be used to track the completion of actionables, or trello could be a good place to track them as well. Make sure and check off items as they’re completed, and review previous Decisions and Action items in the next meeting.

Decisions and action items don’t often manifest on their own. It is also the role of the facilitator to move the discussion toward the learning, change, action or experiment. Give the discussion ample space to breathe, then move toward the idea of improvement.

Some closing thoughts

I had the honor and privilege of accompanying the WordCamp Asia organizing team over the last 10 months as one of their mentors. I brought up this idea of running retros, and eventually facilitated one for one of the teams. A big thanks to @hlashbrooke for prompting me to share these thoughts and techniques with you all, following that experience 😄

Some final thoughts in no particular order:

  • You might try leaving the sprint retro doc open for folks to add to it as they go, rather than wait until the meeting itself. This can be particularly useful if the sprint is longer than 2 weeks, but also helps for teams that are multitasking a lot (as WordCamp organizers do!).
  • I recommend making it clear that people don’t need to wait for a retro to raise a topic. Some topics are timely and should be addressed accordingly.
  • On the flip side, not all topics need to be addressed right away. The sprint also serves to let the team focus. I often suggest, “hey, that’s a great topic, how about we address it in the next retro?” That way folks don’t get unnecessarily distracted by things that aren’t urgent. Also, you don’t want to introduce change or an experiment mid-sprint (unless something is really broken and it’s absolutely vital). Most things can wait, ride it out then introduce change in the next iteration.
  • While conflicts and misunderstandings absolutely can get resolved through this process, a retro is not a replacement for conflict resolution, or to be used punctually as such. This is essentially what ended up happening for WordCamp Asia. It’s not a bad thing, but again, retros are most effective when done regularly.
  • Along those same lines, everyone on a delivery team should participate. For flagship events, this would mean that if one team is running retros, all teams should be running retros. They can each add their own nuance to the way they’re run, but ideally all teams have the same framework to operate in.
  • Community Mentors could potentially be well placed to serve as facilitators, especially for local WordCamps.
  • For flagship events, I’ve always thought of the global lead role as being that of a scrum master, more so than that of a product owner. That is, a servant leader, someone who is their to educate, mentor and coach the team. I see the individual team leads as the product owners, each with the vision and autonomy to set objectives for their teams.
  • A flagship event might then run a scrum of scrums, where individual teams run team retros, then team leads also gather to run them at a global level.
  • It would be interesting to explore how other scrum practices could benefit event organizing teams, but that will have to be another post for another time 😍

Thank you for reading to the end! I hope you have found this interesting and valuable. If there is any area that I may have missed or that you’d like me to develop on further, please let me know. 🙂

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

2019 Annual WordPress Meetup Organizer Survey

A similar message to this post was sent to all WordPress Chapter MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Organizers via meetup.com, but we are also sharing below.

If you are a Meetup Organizer, please feel free to share the survey link with your co-organizers.

Hello Meetup Organizers!

It’s time for the annual meetup organizer survey, and we have a bunch of other stuff to tell you about, too! 

Organizer Survey

The annual survey is how we track progress in the meetup program. If your meetup group has multiple organizers, each organizer should fill in the survey, but please decide among your group who will be the main point of contact with WordPress Community Support in 2020 — we ask for that information in the survey. Here’s your organizer survey:

https://wordpressdotorg.survey.fm/2019-annual-meetup-organizer-survey

In order for your feedback to be included in the results, please complete the survey by 15 March, 2020!

Member Survey

We’ve recently shared the annual meetup program survey with all members. We’ve revised the questions and edited it down to a shorter survey that takes less than 3 minutes to complete. It would be great if you could mention it at your next event and encourage people to respond! In the email to members, we’ve reminded them that all meetup group members are encouraged to plan events that interest them so that there are more things happening in each group without the primary organizers having to do more work. If members of your group offer to organize events, we hope you will encourage them and make sure they feel welcome on the organizing team!

Organizing Team

Speaking of the organizing team, it’s time for a round of clean-up on your meetup.com leadership team. If there are any organizers on your team who haven’t planned an event in 2019, please communicate with them about changing their role to Member so that people can see who is active and can help answer questions. 

WordPress Global Community Sponsors for 2019

A big thank you to our 2019 global sponsors! Their generous support keeps the meetup program free for the whole community and helps to make sure ticket prices for WordCamps stay affordable.

  • Jetpack *
  • WooCommerce *
  • Bluehost *
  • Liquid Web
  • GoDaddy *
  • HubSpot *
  • GreenGeeks
  • DreamHost

* These sponsors support WordPress events worldwide.

Meetup Sponsorship

  •  If a venue is donating space, it is appropriate to list them as the venue sponsor.
  • It is not appropriate to list any company as contributing to the meetup.com dues, since we pay those through the central account.
  • Companies providing refreshments or financial support to cover the cost of refreshments are appropriate to thank, but should be recognized on an even level with their support. Paying for snacks all year? SidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. recognition is great. One-time sponsor? Leaving them listed as a sponsor all year doesn’t quite match; it’s better to thank them in the event listing for the event they are sponsoring.
  • Organizers of the meetup group and its events are volunteers, and should not be listing their businesses as sponsors unless they are providing a venue or financial support/refreshments like an outside company. 

Venue Rental Costs

We encourage organizers to get free or donated space, but if your venue charges a fee, you can submit a request for payment, which we will review and let you know if that is something we can help cover. Keep in mind that the guideline for cost is about $5 USD per person. Venue rental costs are paid from the central budget. If you’d like to submit a payment request, you can do so here by completing the Meetup Venue Approval Request form.

Event Host Designation

This is a small thing, but sometimes meetup organizers set the “WordPress” user as the event host for their meetup events. Please set the event organizer as the event host — when WordPress is the event host, people try to ask us questions about the event that we can’t answer.

Community Team Blog and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.

Meetup organizers are considered part of the community team at WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. If you don’t stop by the community team’s blog often, please drop by every once in a while! In addition, if you haven’t joined the WordPress Slack instance, you can do so at https://chat.wordpress.org. The #community-events channel in Slack is where meetup and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers can chat with each other, ask questions of Community Team deputies, ask for community feedback, etc. 

Thank you for your efforts in 2019, and here’s to an even better 2020!
–The WordPress Global Community Team

#meetups, #survey

do_action hackathon Cheltenham 2019 – building four websites in a day!

It started out, as many great ideas do, as a discussion over a few drinks!  A group of us from the South West WordPress community were enjoying WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe in Berlin.  Buzzing about the event and talking about how much we loved being part of the WordPress community, one of our number, Elliott Richmond, brought up an idea.  He had a local charity called The Sedbury Trust who needed help with their website. We were all eager to lend a hand, as giving back to the community is important to all of us. One of our group, Laura Hunter, had been a part of the first European do_action Day in Bristol, so had a good idea of what was involved. Fuelled by enthusiasm, we all agreed there and then we would give a day of our time to build a website for this charity.

Organising the day, why help just one charity?

After this initial discussion, Elliott ran with the idea and decided that if we were going to help one charity we might as well widen the net and help more.  He gathered advice from others in the WordPress community, organised the venue in Cheltenham and with the help of his fellow Cheltenham WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizer, Richard Bell, started researching charities in the local area. Using the charity commission website they found local charities that either didn’t have a website or looked like they were in need of an update. Emails were sent and follow up calls made to find out if charities were interested. 

We also did shout outs on social media for local charities to come forward. Sometimes people can’t quite believe that they can get something for nothing, so it was important to explain to the charities what a WordPress do_action day is all about.

The charities

Four charities came forward to apply for our help, including the original charity. The charities were;

Swindon Village Community Hall – an important local hub for clubs and events, with a bar for the villagers on a weekend.

Heart Heroes is a charity working with children and their families living with heart conditions.

The Sedbury Trust provides financial grant to families with vulnerable or disabled children in Gloucestershire

CADCAF is a charity that helps care for special needs children and their families.

Now we had four great causes, all we needed to do now was recruit some willing volunteers to give up their time to help!

Recruiting volunteers

The WordPress community is amazing and we are lucky to have such a friendly group of people in the South West.  Many of us are active members of MeetUp groups or have been involved in UK WordCamps. This meant that finding volunteers wasn’t too tricky and we had a great range of developers, project managers and content writers sign up. Many of these people don’t work for big companies, so they gave up a day of running their own businesses to make a difference to others.

Project managers were tasked with liaising with their charity and getting everything ready for the day.  Although the Hackathon is one day there did need to be some research and work upfront to ensure that our time on the day could be spent wisely.

Building four websites in a day!

So finally, the day arrived! After welcomes from Elliott and introductions to the charity representatives and much needed coffee and biscuits, we got to work!  Elliott took the charity members off to train them on all things WordPress and we got down to it. You could sense the determination of everyone in the room to achieve a huge amount in a day.

I was a content writer on the team for Swindon Village Hall with Laura Hunter as our project manager, Emma Irvine as our designer and Lucy Sloss and Matt Seymour as our developers.  Laura and I run our own business together so we did a fair amount of work upfront, including meeting representatives of the charity to understand their requirements. This meant we could come into the day with a clear plan. Our team was just fantastic, although I would say that! We all work differently in our day jobs but we had to very quickly pull together as a team. Luckily, we all got on immediately and were prepared to sometimes make compromises to get the job done. We supported and looked after each other, which was important over a long day.

Every now and again I would look up to see all these people working their socks off to create websites and it was lovely to see everyone giving their all to make a difference.  We stopped for lunch but apart from that it was heads down all day! When our charity representatives finished their training and came to look at what we had been doing they were amazed.  Everyone worked so hard to create websites that these charities can be proud of.

By the end of the day four websites had been created, four charities were very happy and lots of volunteers needed a drink and a sleep! The finished websites all looked great.

The Sedbury Trust

CADCAF

Swindon Village Community Hall

Heart Heroes

We stayed for a chat and a drink afterwards and we were all buzzing about what we had achieved.  New friendships and connections had been made and we felt the warm glow of doing something for others.

It is thanks to the hard work of Elliott Richmond, Richard Bell and Rachel Willoughby that the day was such a success. In the words of Elliott “It’s nice to be nice” and this day is a great example of that! 

What we learnt from do_action Cheltenham

Preparation is key – Despite being called a do_action day, you do need to spend some time upfront gathering requirements and thinking about the design.

Teamwork makes all the difference – All the teams had never worked together before. You have to create a supportive atmosphere where ideas are listened to and people feel happy to ask questions.

Be realistic, it is only one day! – The websites we created were functional and attractive but we all had to make compromises and prioritise the “must-haves”. There wasn’t time for very complicated functionality.

The WordPress community is fantastic! –  There were over 20 people from the WordPress community involved in the day, all of whom gave up their time for free.

This will make a real difference to the charities involved – By taking away some of the overhead of creating a website, this allows the charities to concentrate on what they do best.

#do_action

Recap of the Diverse Speaker Training group (#wpdiversity) on Feb 12, 2020

Summary: We followed up on where team members are at in their individual projects. We talked about where we are at in collecting our stats for our 2019 Year End Report.

Continue reading

#wpdiversity

X-post: WordCamp.org session timestamp changes

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/meta: Comment on WordCamp.org session timestamp changes

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Planing for WordCamp Asia 2020 Contributor Day

Contributor Day at WordCamp Asia is on 21 February! This will be a great chance for the team to get some work done on Community programs and tools.

WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more., Asia, WordCamp Europe, and WordCamp US are considered flagship events and are always a great opportunity for teams to get together, contribute, and onboard more people. There are going to be a lot of us present, so we should take advantage of that and maximize our time together!

We’d like to plan projects that can include people who’ve been contributing to the Community Team for a while, as well as projects that will work for people who are coming to work with us for the first time.

Please comment on this post if you have project ideas or suggestions for tasks we could work on together while in Bangkok. Hope to see you there!

#contributor-day, #wcasia

WordCamp and Meetup application vetting sprints – February 2020

We currently have a backlog of WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. and MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. applications. We would like to request the help of all deputies to help us stay responsive to community members, and to help keep our queues moving forward. To that end, we’ll be holding few vetting sprints 🙂

Each sprint will last for two hours, and we will collectively vet as many WordCamp and Meetup applications in that time as possible. If you are a deputy and would like to coordinate a sprint at another time, then please comment on this post and I’ll add it to the list.

All deputies are welcome and encouraged to join! Please comment on this post if you think you can take part.

What is a Vetting Sprint?

A vetting sprint for WordCamp or Meetup applications is a scheduled session where all available deputies meet together in the #community-team channel channel in the WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. group. Over the course of the sprint, we will all work on vetting applications and use the Slack channel as a central place to discuss what we’re working on and support each other.

Who can take part?

Any deputies who have access to the WordCamp centralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. listings and/or the Meetup central listings can take part. That means people who have completed the deputy training, signed the deputy agreement and been given access to the dashboard.

If you are a deputy who has been active in the last year, then you should have access to this. If you don’t have access and still want to take part, please comment here or ask in #community-team channel and we’ll sort out your access.

How Does it Work?

We will be going through the open WordCamp and Meetup applications that still need vetting – you can find WordCamp listings here and Meetup listings here. We also have some handy notes to help you with the vetting process.

As always, deputies can work on these things at any time that suits them, but these dedicated sprints help to provide some direct, focused time for it.

#vetting-sprint