Online WordCamps – Resources, Tools and Information

WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. groups are already moving their events online, and there are guidelines for online do_action charity hackathons as well. The next event series to evolve into this online paradigm is, naturally, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more..

In order to assist organisers with the process of moving their WordCamp online, and to pave the way for new organisers to get involved, the Community Team has set up some tools, processes, and documentation to make things possible. You will find all of this in the new Online Events Handbook, but read on for a broad overview.

Production & Captioning Vendors for All

Since the pilot program for supplying production vendors to online WordCamps was announced, a few WordCamps have taken advantage of this – namely WordCamp Spain, WordCamp Santa Clarita, and the upcoming WordCamp Kent. This pilot program has proved to be a success, which means that all WordCamp organizing teams in 2020 will be able to count on this support.

In practice, this means that the online production and captioning costs associated with any online WordCamp taking place this year will be covered in full without the need for local sponsorship. As an organiser, you can make use of the vendors available or choose to work with a local supplier.

You will find more information in the documentation about production vendors, as well as what to look out for if you do look for local companies.

Updates to WordCamp Guidelines

In order to cater to online WordCamps, the guidelines for these events have been updated to be more flexible and adapt to the needs of the format. You can find these updated guidelines in the new handbook – they cover the regional focus of online events and important changes to the budget review and planning processes.

Note that these updates apply to online events only – when in-person events are able to resume, those events will follow the guidelines that were already in place taking note of these additional guidelines for in-person events taking place in 2020.

Code of Conduct for Online Events

In order to ensure these online events remain as safe and welcoming as in-person WordCamps, the new handbook includes a code of conduct that has been updated to cater to this new format. There is also some new documentation on effective ways to moderate the chat during a live stream and how you can ensure your event’s chat remains friendly and inviting.

Acknowledging Sponsors at Online Events

You can read this handbook page for some excellent ideas about how to acknowledge your online event sponsors, and more information will be published soon with information about recognising global sponsors. One requirement that has been added in here, is that all organisers must have their sponsorship packages approved by a deputy at the budget review stage.

The WordCamp Schedule

The WordCamp schedule has been updated to indicate whether an event is taking place online or not – this will provide an easy reference for anyone interested in attending an online WordCamp no matter where they are in the world. Note that Online WordCamp tickets will always be free, so anyone around the world can easily attend.

Tips for WordCamp Speakers

Since presenting a talk online is a very different experience to doing so in-person, here are some tips for speakers to help you make the most out of the experience.

Guidelines for In-Person WordCamps

If you would like to organise an in-person WordCamp for any date after June 2020, please refer to the updated guidelines for these events.

WordCamps Beyond 2020

The updated guidelines outlined here will be in effect for the remainder of the year. The team plans to review these guidelines in Q3 2020 so that organizers applying for a 2021 WordCamp have greater clarity and enough time to prepare for either an online or in-person event. 


Does this all sound like something you want to get involved in? Fill out the WordCamp organiser application form to get started!

On a personal note, I’m excited to see the online events that local organisers put together – while this is a challenging new frontier for all of us, the need to move our events online will provide a platform for a huge amount of innovation within our community.

Is there anything you think was missed here? Or any other resources or documentation you think would be helpful for the team to provide for organisers of online WordCamps? Please make it known in the comments!

Proposal: Recognition for event volunteers and attendees in WordPress.org profile

About two years ago Meta Trac ticket (note: please don’t continue in that ticket, this P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. is the more correct place for it) was opened about adding a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. volunteer and attendee badges to WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profiles. A few weeks ago Taco did bring it back to the discussion and I promised to write a proposal to move this forward.

Profile badges are graphics that do show users contributions towards WordPress project.

It is suggested that we should:

  • Give a badge for WordCamp volunteers
  • Give a badge for WordCamp attendees
  • Give a badge for MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. attendees

Let’s dive into each badge for a second.

WordCamp volunteers

Technically giving a badge for WordCamp volunteers is probably the most easiest of the badges to give automatically. In coordination with WordCamp MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team, we could find a way to track all volunteers and their WordPress.org usernames as we do for organisers and speakers too.

It’s also almost unarguable that WordCamp volunteers are contributing to the project, so they should get a badge. In 2017 there was a conversation about recognising volunteers in WordCamp websites, that ended up in conclusion that we should do that. At that time the discussion didn’t consider profile badges and as an end result using Admin Flags functionality was suggested.

WordCamp Attendees

This is technically more harder to do, because we don’t ask WordPress.org usernames when attendees purchase a ticket.

Sure we could add a field and ask that, but then comes the question when badge should be added to profile. When a ticket is purchased? Then what happens if that ticket changes owner, is refunded or attendee doesn’t show up. If we add the badge after attendee has marked as attended in Camptix, not all would get a badge because not all WordCamps do use the functionality to mark attendance.

It’s also arguable whether attending to WordCamp is actually contributing to the project and something from which they should get a badge.

In the Trac ticket @andreamiddleton pointed out that in 2014 WordCamp San Francisco worked out a way display event registration and attendance on the activity log. She suggested that we recognise attendees in that way instead of giving badges.

Meetup attendees

Technically this is the hardest thing to achieve, because Meetups live totally their own lives in Meetup.com and don’t have strong connection to WordCamp.org or WordPress.org systems. We don’t have a way to link Meetup.com profile to WordPress.org username for giving them a badge. Surely it can probably be done if team invests a lot of time on developing this feature.

The same discussion as with WordCamp attendees on their level of contribution to the project also applies to Meetup attendees.

The proposal

I’m proposing:

Badge for WordCamp volunteers

We should create a new badge for WordCamp volunteers and recognise them the same way as we do for organisers and speakers. Technical aspects need to be decided with WordCamp Meta team, but I’d create a new post type and re-use same functionalities that are used for organisers and speakers.

Log note for WordCamp attendees

We should start asking WordPress.org username during ticket purchase with an optional field in preparations to recognising WordCamp attendees.

I’m in favour of Andrea’s suggestion on showing the attendance on profile log instead of giving them a badge. Log note could be added after the WordCamp, in case the ticket changes owner on the first event day. Logic could be that everyone with a ticket does get the note unless there are at least a certain amount of attendees marked as attended when log note would be added only to those attendees.

What about Meetups and other event formats?

For Meetup and our other event format attendees, I would say it’s a too low-level contribution towards the WordPress project and technically too complicated to implement. Hopefully we can start recognising them at some point, but not for now.

Feedback

Read the original proposal and discussion on Meta Track ticket, there are good arguments and points. Note: please don’t continue in that ticket, this P2 is the more correct place for it.

Please share your feedback on the topic and especially on:

  • Should WordCamp volunteers get a badge?
  • Should WordCamp attendees get a badge or a note in their log?
  • What things do we need to take into consideration in these cases?

Share your thoughts before 2020-08-13.

#attendees, #meetups-2, #recognition, #volunteers, #wordcamps

X-post: WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day: Feedback and achievements

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day: Feedback and achievements

Meetup organizer newsletter suggestions for July 2020

We’ve started working on the July 2020 edition of the meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizer newsletter, and we’d love to hear from you as to what to include!

This newsletter typically includes:

  • An interesting event format that organizers might want to try
  • News about global community team projects
  • News about the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project
  • News about upcoming online WordCamps or meetups, in the recent months.

If there are any topics you’d like to see included, or if you’ve come up with or participated in any interesting meetup event formats that you think are worth highlighting, please share that with us in the comments on this post.

We’ll leave this post open for comments until Wednesday, July 8th, and send the newsletter out on Friday, July 10th. If any deputies are interested in helping us put together this newsletter, awesome! Just let us know in the comments.

#newsletter

#WPDiversity Workshops in July: Different this month!

The Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) is holding workshops this summer to support diverse voices to share knowledge and stories at virtual WordPress meetups and WordCamps.

Our schedule in July is different!

  • We have an event for women in Latin America (Saturday, July 11)
  • We are holding an event for WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers (Saturday, July 18)
  • We have a change to our regular workshop series for people of marginalized or underrepresented groups in WordPress. This month, one of the 3 workshops will be a special class on “Answering Tricky questions“! (Tuesday, July 28, Wednesday, July 29, and Thursday, July 30)

Action requested: Please invite people you know to attend these events!

Read more:

  Continue reading

#wpdiversity, #wpdiversityworkshops

Community Team Chat Agenda | July 2 2020

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 02 July 2020. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, July 02, 2020, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, July 02, 2020, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

  • Diverse Speaker Workshops Report – June 2020 – Jill Binder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/22/diverse-speaker-workshops-report-june-2020/
  • Tuesday Trainings: Encouraging Diversity in Meetups and WordCamps – Angela Jin – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/23/tuesday-trainings-encouraging-diversity-in-meetups-and-wordcamps/
  • Video and YouTube Workflow for Online WordCamps: Request for Feedback posted by Hari Shanker R. – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/24/video-and-youtube-workflow-for-online-wordcamps-request-for-feedback/
  • 2020 WordCamps stalled in pre-planning, update by Cami Kaos – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/26/2020-wordcamps-stalled-in-pre-planning/
  • Timi posted a Proposal: Dedicated communication place for deputies – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/29/proposal-dedicated-communication-place-for-deputies/
  • Estela posted an update on: Exploration of a new classification for user documentation – https://make.wordpress.org/docs/2020/06/22/exploration-of-a-new-classification-for-user-documentation/
  • Another edition of Tuesday Trainings by Evarlese – Tuesday Trainings: Tips for managing an online meetup – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/30/tuesday-trainings-tips-for-managing-an-online-meetup/

Highlighted P2 posts

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#deputy-chat, #meeting-agenda, #team-chat

Tuesday Trainings: Tips for managing an online meetup

Even though many of our contributions to the WordPress community take place online, shifting our meetups to a virtual format brings its own fair share of changes, challenges, and adaptations. For many of us, connecting virtually may be a new experience full of new tools and new ways of communicating.

As part of our Tuesday Training series, we’re sharing some tips and tricks to help MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers create an accessible and friendly place when connecting with their community online. For additional resources, we also highly recommend checking out the Virtual Events Handbook, as well.

Password protect and manage who can get in.

First things first: part of creating a community space is ensuring that the space is safe and inclusive for everyone. Many of us are using Zoom for our meetups, though any virtual meeting tool may bring with it its own risks and challenges for keeping our virtual spaces in line with the expectations of our Online Code of Conduct.

To help protect fellow organizers and participants, check out the Zoom security settings page. You may want to:

  • Keep the hangout link private until 15 minutes or so prior to the beginning of your event.
  • Password protect or require approval for admittance. This ensures that everyone joining is part of the community, rather than spammers taking advantage of a situation.
  • Set expectations in your meetup invite so that attendees know what to expect in regard to their admission. 

Leave space for a check-in.

One of the best parts of meeting in person is the networking and connections that come about from being in a shared space with a shared interest. Just because we’re meeting virtually, that doesn’t mean we have to lose that experience!

When planning for your meetup, aim to leave some time at the beginning and the end for a check-in with folks. You can even offer to meet up a few minutes – 15 to 30 minutes – before the event itself starts so that those interested have time for a networking or social opportunity. Leaving the opportunity for some free-form conversation can help to strengthen and maintain our bonds, even if we’re meeting from our respective living rooms.

Share expectations at the beginning. 

Just as we would introduce new members to expectations and “how things work” at the beginning of an in-person meetup, the same applies to online meetings, too. In fact, it may be even more applicable as your events become more accessible to a wider-variety of people who may or may not have experience with the WordPress community.

Before diving into your presentation, consider taking a few moments to introduce yourself, the group, the code of conduct, and what will be expected during the night’s event. In particular, it can be useful to let attendees know if there will be breakout sessions, activities, or exercises, so they can prepare themselves. 

Leverage tools provided by the software you’re using.

It can feel less personal to participate and present to a virtual audience. It’s hard to replace that in-person feedback that comes from eye contact, body language, and quick chats after your talk. However, when planning out your meetup, look for ways in which you can make your hangout interactive.

For example, Zoom has features like breakout rooms (for small group conversations), surveys, and Q&As for some real-time contributions from participants. Likewise, rather than relying on chat for participants to ask questions, welcome video questions beforehand or invite participants to unmute and ask their questions out loud. If you want to get really creative, you can explore setting up games in Kahoot!, engaging attendees in sli.do, and exploring YouTube Live comments for real-time participation.

Be respectful of time – and distractions.

Doing things online can come with unexpected challenges. Your bandwidth suddenly drops. Another call goes over time. Partners and kids forget about that meeting you told them about. In other words, life happens – and at home, we may have even fewer boundaries between our WordPress selves and home selves.

As an organizer, keep this in mind when planning your meeting. If you’re doing breakout rooms, maybe it’s best to stick with three participants, rather than a one-on-one check-in, so there’s a buffer if someone has to suddenly drop offline. Allow for multiple avenues of participation, such as video, chat, or submitting questions prior to the event. Understand that folks might disappear or come in and out at times, and set any expectations accordingly. 

Don’t underestimate the power of a social hangout.

If in doubt, don’t overthink it. If you’re planning a meetup and no clear topic presents itself, consider simply hosting a “Coffee Break” or social hour. It’s also a great time to experiment! Just having an opportunity to casually check-in with one another, chat, and, quite literally, hang out can help maintain and boost the connections between your members – even while we can’t see each other in person.

Above all, it can help to see online meetups as an opportunity. Those who might not normally be able to attend may have more flexibility without the commute to your meetup space. With new members, you may see new volunteers to speak, or even organize, events in the future. By creating a safe space where members can continue to learn, bond, and connect with one another, we can continue to keep our local communities strong!

Looking for more great Trainings?

@jillbinder has some great content coming up soon!

Meetups: Would you like to have more diverse representation in the speakers at your online (and when it’s available again, in-person) meetup events? On July 18, we will teach you how to facilitate the workshop that gives your underrepresented community members the motivation, confidence, and tools we need to start: tiny.cc/wpdiversity 

#tuesdaytrainings

X-post: Exploration of a new classification for user documentation

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/docs: Comment on Exploration of a new classification for user documentation

Proposal: Dedicated communication place for deputies

For some time I’ve personally have felt that deputies would need another place than #community-team SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel to discuss some topics. Mary’s proposal about monthly virtual calls is a great one to create a place for deputies to see each other and share how they are, though it has a slightly different function than I’m proposing here.

To keep it short, my few arguments why deputies would need dedicated channel:

1) We have 51 active deputies and the #community-team channel has over 1 500 members

2) During exceptional situations, like resent COVID-19 response and things caused by that, deputies needed to communicate realtime a lot while working with fast actions to help organisers. And in other hand, deputies stepping in to help with the response work needed to get (at that point) internal instructions. Sharing and creating internal instructions on a channel that has over 1 500 members, means that community members will see an incomplete and in some cases information that is subject to change. This means that #community-team channel is not space place for deputies to draft some posts, changes and guidelines in urgent or controversial situations.

3) Currently, some discussion that is internal for deputies for a reason or another (like how to respond in sudden situations/cases, how to handle this thing we haven’t faced before or issues that are delicate) are hepping in small(ish) deputy DM groups. For transparency this is bad.

4) The dedicated channel could encourage deputies to ask help when they need it during their work.

This is why I’m proposing: creating a new private channel for active deputies. Active deputies would be defined based on this deputy sheet we have.

Yes, the private channel is somewhat against the transparency we as a team and as a project in general cherish. At the same time, it should be remembered that some discussions that could involve all deputies happen in smaller DM groups. Creating a private channel for all deputies would hopefully reduce the need for that kind of DM groups and add transparency amongst deputies.

Also, the CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team has a private channel for some discussions mainly related to releasing new versions, because it’s more convenient to have a smaller channel instead of trying to have the discussion in the public channel where a lot of conversation happens. (Someone who is more familiar with the Core team can correct me if I’m wrong).

And the last argument in favour of the private channel is that we are already good in directing discussion from Slack to P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. when needed, so why we wouldn’t be good on moving some discussion from a private channel to public #community-team if the topic is something that can be discussed publicly.

When pitching this idea to some members of our deputy team, it got objections and a counter-proposal of creating new public channel for this purpose.

Please leave your feedback on the topic and particularly in the following questions:

  1. Should deputies have another place than the #community-team channel to discuss among themselves if needed?
  2. If deputies should have a dedicated channel, should it be private or public?

Leave your feedback on 2020-07-31 latest.

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

2020 WordCamps stalled in pre-planning

In a normal year we see a number of events that stall in the pre-planning phase and just kind of fizzle out. The number of those events stuck in pre-planning seem higher than ever due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Ask: Deputies will you please update this list of events in pre-planning that have been stalled long enough to require us to check in on their plans to to give us a better idea of which events are cancelled and which will be shifting to an online only event?

Some of these events may already have discussed cancelling or moving online and we’ve had conversations with them but haven’t received their final decision. Some of them may just not have been updated in Central.WordCamp.org. Either way let’s make sure we have the most up to date information so we have an accurate look at what could be coming in the next 6 months.

Through the end of the weekend please select events with which you have already worked and been in contact. After we’ve all had a chance to select events we’ve worked with we can divided up the remainder to reach out to starting Monday.

If you’re an organizer whose event has been stalled in preplanning, please feel free to update us on the status of your event.

The linked document should be viewable by everyone with the link and several deputies have already been granted access. If you require access please let me know in the comments.

Thanks so much!

#wordcamps #community-management #deputies