How to contribute to the Global Community Team

These are some of the different options for getting involved with the WordPress Global Community Team 🙂

1) The best way to start is by organizing Meetups and/or WordCamps in your city. If you feel like you can represent WordPress, follow the code of conduct for WordPress events, and follow the five good-faith rules for WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers, then you can apply to join the program: 

  1. a) Check if there is a WordPress Meetup group in your city – if there is one, join it, attend the events, and step up by either helping the organizers or becoming an organizer yourself!
  2. b) Check if there is a WordCamp in your area – you can attend, apply to speak, volunteer, sponsor and/or help organize your local WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more.!
  3. c) If there is not an existing WordPress Meetup group (or if there is an inactive group) in your town/city and you want to start one, you can apply here – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

2) If you already have experience organizing a successful WordCamp and have an availability of 2-3 hours a month, you can apply to become a WordCamp mentor here: – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

3) If you have had at least 1 year of experience as a Meetup organizer and/or have been a WordCamp lead organizer, you are familiar with the WordPress Open Source project and philosophy, you have at least 2-3 hours a week available for contributing, and you accept our Code of Conduct, you can apply to become a Community Deputy. We are a team of community-minded people around the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and keep things moving at WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each.. You can apply to join the Global Community Team as a deputy here – you’ll receive a reply within a couple of weeks.

Note: if you have any additional questions, join us in the #community-events channel of Make WordPress Slack, we’ll be happy to help you there!

#contributors

WordCamp US 2019 – Community Team Plans

We are less than a month away from WordCamp US 2019, which means it’s time to get organised!

WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe and WordCamp US are what we consider flagship events and are always a great opportunity for teams to get together, contribute and onboard more people. There are going to be a whole lot of us present and we should take advantage of that and maximize our time together.

Please add in the comments ideas and suggestions for tasks we could work on together while in Saint Louis.

We also need at least two, three Team Leads to coordinate the different activities:

  • Deliver the Team initial presentation
  • Onboard new contributors
  • Help coordinate work during the day
  • Deliver the end of day recap of what was achieved during the day

Please raise your hand in the comments if you are available for this.

Deadline to comment is October 17 so we can discuss this during the next two Community chats: after that date I will summarise in a “squad goals” post (like the one we had last year) and we will go from there!

#contributor-day, #wcus

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Try These Two Weird Tricks To Get More Speakers For Your Meetup!

Well, now that I have your attention, check out something we’re doing at our meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. to broaden our speaker pool.

I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where we’ve had a WordPress meetup since sometime in 2011. The coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. organizers have pretty much stayed the same, but attendees have come and gone over the years. The size has stayed pretty consistent, varying from 4 or 5 people to 20-25 people in an evening, depending on the topic, etc.

The speakers tend to be the organizers, or one of several regular attenders. We ask people to speak, we work with them, and sometimes it works and they speak. Once.

To make a long story short, after a few years I got tired of hearing ourselves speak.

Then one week it was Brian Richards’ (@rzen) turn to talk, and it turned out he had to be on the road. So he recorded his talk, and I simply played it from my laptop to the giant TV in our venue. It worked flawlessly, though we couldn’t ask questions at the end. Brian even turned to his right and looked right at me sitting next to the TV to hand it off at the end, it was perfect.

That’s when I thought “Why can’t we have remote people do this over a live Hangout or something?”

Option 1: Live Remote Guests

I didn’t do much about it until some months later when we were talking about WordPress frameworks and WP Rig and someone said “Man, wouldn’t be cool if we could get someone like Morten Rand-Hendrickson to speak at our meetup?”. So I pulled out my phone, pinged Morten on LinkedIn and said “Hey man, would you be willing to do a short presentation about WP Rig for our meetup over Hangouts?” And he said “Why sure!”.

So, a couple weeks later Morten talked about WP Rig, all the way from Vancouver.

Then someone asked about Membership plugins, so I reached out to Jason Coleman from Paid Memberships Pro and Pippin Williamson from Restrict Content Pro.  Pippin said “I don’t really run RCP anymore, you want Ashley Gibson”. So I contacted Ashley. Everyone involved said they’d love to take part.

Rather than spread the topic out over 2 weeks, I had Ashley and Jason on at the same time. It was a bit more of an interview than presentation, but great stuff was shared. I recorded it, and it’s on our YouTube channel.  Check it out here:

Ashley is in the UK, and Jason is in Pennsylvania. I quickly realized that I never really had to feel stuck finding a speaker again.  As long as I plan well, the entire global WordPress community is available to our meetup (more on that below). AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) talks, technology talks, business talks, design talks, all right there for the asking. Of course some people will say no, but there are enough people in the WordPress world that SOMEONE will say yes to just about any topic.

Important: don’t just go after people who are well-known. There are plenty of people who are really excellent at what they do who aren’t “internet famous.” These people will almost certainly bring new perspectives and information that will be extra valuable and thought-provoking for your group, because they may not have published it before.

Here are some tips on how to make this work smoothly.

  1. Try to stay booked 2 months out. This should be true whether you’re digital or not, people are more likely to be available if you ask before they’ve had time to fill up their calendar.
  2. Place the speaker’s needs first. If they say no, say thank you and move on. If it’s REALLY important to you, explain that it’s important and ask if there’s anything you can do to make it easier or more comfortable. Sometimes they’ll say yes, sometimes no. Always walk away after that second no.
  3. Once you have a speaker lined up, make it clear to attendees that the speaker will be remote or recorded.
  4. Have the right tech stack in your venue. Projectors are great, but rarely have speakers. We use a giant TV with speakers built in, so we’re good.  If you use a projector, get some computer speakers and plug them into the presentation laptop.
  5. If you do more than a little talking to the presenter, try to get a microphone, you’ll sound WAY better. A catch is that the mic will also want to record the TV and you end up with double audio. See point 5.
  6. Try to use real recording software. I use Screenflow. It gave me a video channel and two audio channels, one from the hangout and one from my mic.  So even though my mic recorded the TV also I was able to clean it up with some tedious editing. If you’re SURE you can remember, you can turn your mic on and off when using and not using. I would forget, I’m sure if it.
  7. Once it’s recorded and cleaned up, publish it! Put it on your meetup blog, or meetup.com.  It could go on YouTube, or even WordPress.tv. It’s not just for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. talks, it for any valid WordPress teaching video. Now you’re not only getting the very best people in their field to talk to your local group, you’re adding to the global knowledge pool.

When You’re Ready To Speak

One of the purposes of a local meetup is to help people become more comfortable speaking in front of others, potentially so they could speak at a WordCamp. But what if you want to practice, and don’t live near a meetup? I have it on good authority that if you contact a meetup organizer and offer to speak at their meetup, they’ll say YES before you can finish your sentence.  Generally.

If you live far from any meetup, contact a friend on the internet who goes to one and ask to be connected to the meetup organizer. They’ll vet you the same way they would anyone who wants to speak, but I promise you there will be no end of places you can do this.

If you need lots of practice, do it at multiple meetups.  While I recommended recording above, most don’t, so the chances of someone getting tired of your message are really low.

Option 2: WordPress.tv Episodes

WordPress.tv is an under-rated treasure of the WordPress community. There are thousands of really excellent talks on hundreds of topics. Filtering through there can help you find people that you’ve never heard of delivering valuable information.

Here are some benefits of using WordPress.tv:

  1. Avoid all the hazards of a live presentation: computer crashes, batteries dying, etc.
  2. Scheduling with the speaker is not an issue
  3. You already have permission to use the video
  4. You can know exactly what will be covered
  5. You can know exactly how long the talk will be

What about questions?

An advantage of a live talk is that the crowd can ask questions afterward. With a WordPress.tv talk you lose that benefit. One option is to do a hybrid. Let the speaker know you’re going to play their video, and ask if they’d be willing to be online at the end for questions, whether in video or even just SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

Summary

We live in a digital world, where incredibly knowledgeable people are mere seconds away at any time. The WordPress community tends to be very giving as long as you don’t abuse it. If you’re finding yourself without a speaker, or need some variety in your speaker pool, reach beyond your local meetup and tap that potential. You may be surprised at how willing people are to help you.

#google-hangout, #google-hangouts, #wordpress-tv

Community Team Chat Agenda | Thursday, 17 October 2019

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 17 October 2019. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, October 17, 2019, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Highlighted P2 posts

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#meeting-agenda

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Meetup organizer newsletter suggestions for October 2019

It’s about that time again, when we start preparing the October 2019 edition of the meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers newsletter.

If there are any topics you’d recommend we include, or any interesting meetup event formats you think are worth highlighting, please comment/leave your ideas/suggestions in the comments on this post.

We’ll leave this post open for comments until the 19th of October 2019.

The newsletter typically spotlights:

  • an interesting event format that organizers might want to try out
  • news about global community team projects
  • news about the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project

Thanks!

X-post: Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on October 17th, 2019

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/meta: Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on October 17th, 2019

Handbook Working Group – Let’s do this, take two!

Despite a banging start, with a lot of talented people showing interest and willingness to make the Community documentation better, I failed at keeping the group going, due to biting on more than I can chew.
It happens.

What is so great about having things published in the blog and in TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. is that other people can adopt the project, so here we go again!

Rocìo @_dorsvenabili has kindly offered to continue with the project and enrich it with another layer that will make it even more impactful for our global community.

I won’t spoil anything, but I ask you please to re-commit to the group if you can or join it anew if this is the first time you heard about it! Leave your SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. name in the comments, thank you!

If you want to read more before raising your hand:

Thanks!

#community-handbook, #handbook

Discussion: How do we improve how we collect feedback from Meetup groups?

Every year, we distribute a survey to members of official WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. groups to gather statistics about the program as well as individual groups, in order to help improve the program.

Since we’ve started distributing the Meetup annual survey in 2014, we haven’t seen a very high response rate. For the 2018 survey, with 385,250 members in 691 groups, we only received 912 responses.

In collecting feedback on the recent post about revising the survey questions, it has occurred to me that we could do much more than improve the questions on the survey. Below are all the options we’ve thought of so far:

  • Improving the survey questions. We’ve discussed this previously.
  • Improving the promotion of the survey. Are there other ways we could promote the survey aside from sending a message via meetup.com?
  • Changing the timing of the survey. In the past, we’ve sent the survey in December or January, which have been pointed out as a busy time of year for many people’s inboxes.
  • Translating the survey. Would having the survey translated to non-english languages help improve engagement?
  • Building a new tool. One idea is to build a new tool, perhaps something like the proposed Speaker Feedback tool, but for each meetup.

Are there any of these options that you feel may work well for collecting feedback from Meetup groups? Do you have other ideas we could explore? Please comment if you have any thoughts, by 10 November 2019.

Recap of the Diverse Speaker Training group (#wpdiversity) on Oct. 9, 2019

Attending: @jillbinder @miriamgoldman @cguntur @amyjune @aurooba

Start: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C037W5S7X/p1570640492005100

Agenda:

  1. Reports
  2. Collecting data for WCUS
  3. Speaker roster doc ready & starting marketing
  4. WCUS contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.
  5. Open discussion!

Reports

What are you working on? How is it going? Do you have any obstacles?

  • Green: On plan. No help needed.
  • Yellow: Not on plan but I have a strategy to get there
  • Red: Not on plan, no plan to get there, I’m lost!

@miriamgoldman
I’m green on the following: Running a training next Wednesday, working with @angelasjin on a specialized Train the Deputies training in late November, and finishing up the trainer onboarding doc.

@jillbinder: To add to @miriamgoldman’s report:
She and I have started brainstorming and now implementing how to delegate items from her task list. One of these major items is communicating and following through with the meetups through all the stages of their process in Helpscout.
Thank you @cguntur for stepping into the role! Now titled: MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Care Specialist.

@cguntur
I am Red on Resources page for the speaker mentor program. I pinged Jeremy again this week, but haven’t heard back from him.

(We discussed next actions)

I just got started with the meeup care stuff. Will get more done in the next couple of weeks probably

@amyjune
I finished my plan to present at BADCamp. I am planning on working with some of the folks in the Drupal space to take the training to other regional camps (I’ll be in florida in Feb and Chicago in March)

@aurooba
Marketing
Apologies for my absence here for a while. Things got a little crazy in my personal life and it took a while to sort it out and reintroduce all my commitments in a way that wasn’t overwhelming.

We have the beginnings of a marketing plan created: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Wlv75QpVVkMqJrpw8M18nya4_iWGMOHUpzfPvM_U954/edit

We have the go-ahead from the Marketing Team to start creating assets for each item in the plan. A few folks from the Marketing Team have volunteered to help out and if we can get some skeletons and drafts ready, they can be edited and more thoroughly refined during Contributor Day at WCUS at the Marketing Table.

I’ll be meeting with Andrea and Jill again soon to get final thoughts before we start creating things, so we should have a finalized plan with timelines by the end of next week, hopefully. At that time, I’ll have a targetted list that people can pick and choose from to help out with if they wish.

@jillbinder: @aurooba So glad you’re back, and that is amazing work on marketing!
Also I’m glad to hear we may have items for Contrib day. I started thinking a little bit and couldn’t come up with anything. I’m adding that to the agenda.

2. Collecting data for WCUS.

Each year we collect our stats together for a few weeks before WCUS just in case Matt can use them in his State of the WordState of the Word This is the annual report given by Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress at WordCamp US. It looks at what we’ve done, what we’re doing, and the future of WordPress. https://wordpress.tv/tag/state-of-the-word/. post.
Not to mention being able to tell the story of our success.

Quick stats as of today:
Our team was on hold until I think it was May, so it’s actually half a year of stats.
So considering that it’s half a year and we’ve been in improvement mode rather than growing mode, things are looking pretty good.

We’ve been in contact on Helpscout with 22 meetups so far this year.
We’ve trained 17 of them. That’s 77%! Higher rate than last year. Our improvements are working!

To our knowledge, 3 have run it. Probably more have…

Milan, Italy
Torino, Italy
Vancouver, Canada

Oakland, California, USA is about to run it

An immediate goal for us will be to record all that we know who have run it.

Specifically since December 1, 2018, the last State of the Word. Oh yeah,… I don’t think I counted those in the stats. I’ll update that today.

Request:
Do you know other Meetups in WordPress who have run it since December 1, 2018 ?
SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. me or @cguntur to add it to our Tracker.

If you already have access to our Tracker spreadsheet, you can go ahead and add it.

@cguntur The first thing for you in the Meetup Care role will be to follow up with those who have been trained and who haven’t run it yet, last year and this year, to see if they ran it this year. We can talk more about that later.

@cguntur: @jillbinder I was thinking the same thing as I read your messages

@jillbinder
Soon we will have a better process for knowing who ran it. People will get the speaker resource page, which includes the mentorship program, in exchange for their feedback form telling us how their workshop went.
(New feedback form creation is on my list.)

Or maybe just for telling us that they ran it…… I don’t want to miss out on knowing who ran it just because they didn’t want to do the questionnaire… Will think on this. (Open to thoughts, too.)

@aurooba: Maybe having a questionnaire that has the first question – did you run the workshop?, and then the option to either just submit or do a more detailed questionnaire.

3. Speaker roster doc ready & starting marketing

A thing I started working on last year, and thought I could finish quickly 2-3 months ago, and am grateful that it’s now been looked over by folks with different backgrounds than Andrea and I (and the one person in the community who gave feedback when I posted it to the P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. last year),
and so has taken a whole bunch of my bandwidth in the last few months ! but is very worth it,
our “How To Build A Diverse Speaker Roster” doc is now ready for the Make WordPress Community Handbook.

Hooray!!

And luckily, being the internet, we can always keep refining it as needed.

It wound up being especially important to finish as much of the content for our WCUS workshop is coming from it. So my awesome WCUS workshop team and I have been working on the workshop material and that document concurrently.

I’m really proud of both of these things!

The doc is now in the hands of @courtneypk to put into 2 docs on the handbook.
She’s incorporating the new info from it into the “make inclusive spaces” existing doc,
and creating a new one for the Speaker Roster doc.

This is tied into our marketing as I was waiting for it to be finished before putting info about our workshop into the Meetup and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. handbooks, so that that doc could be included at the same time.
It’s a big deal and I can’t wait to show it to you (again) !

I’ll also be asking you to tweet it out once it’s up.

Sidenote: Our WordCamp US workshop content on creating a welcoming and diverse space is an amazing pair with the speaker content. It’s no use inviting speakers if they’re not feeling welcome. And attendees are more likely to want to contribute in ways such as speaking if they’re feeling more welcome.
Andrea’s team is going to make our content available in the future for WP communities to self-study.

Also, we did a public practise of it on the weekend and it went really well. People had big aha’s during the workshop.

4. Let’s start thinking about how we can use the WCUS Contributor day.

I think only @aurooba and I will be there from our team
(@angelasjin will be there too but will be very busy being one of the main orgs of the event)
but we’ll have access to other keen folk who want to help out.

@aurooba had some marketing ideas for that time.

@aurooba: Yes! I’ll know more after the meeting with you and Andrea

@jillbinder: For now, just a request to all to start thinking about it.

By then I should have the new training complete, so it might even be something we can give to Polyglots for translating……. (cc @rahuldsarker and @bhargavmehta — I know you won’t be at WCUS but just good info to know about in Translation team)

I’ll also have the workshop recorded that I’m doing with you Oct 26 & 27, so maybe having someone cut those down into the modules.

@miriamgoldman: I may not be physically there at WCUS, but I will make myself available on Slack that day if anyone is interested in my subteam!

@jillbinder: On that note — it would be great if someone who is attending could grab timestamps of the start of each new module.
It’ll make more sense for me to ask about timestamp taking in our next meeting just before that weekend.

5. Five minutes left for Open Discussion

Anything on your mind relating to our team that you’d like to bring up?

@miriamgoldman: Happy to see how amazing things are going!

@cguntur: I won’t be there at WCUS, but am happy to help remotely if you need

@jillbinder: Thanks so much for attending today and for your engaged participation. It feels so good to have an active and forward-thinking team.

End: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C037W5S7X/p1570644057069300

Next Actions

  1. Do you know other Meetups in WordPress who have run it since December 1, 2018 ? Slack me or @cguntur to add it to our Tracker.
  2. Jill set meeting with Andrea and Aurooba
  3. Jill talk to Chandrika about collecting who has run the workshop
  4. In the next meeting, Jill ask someone to mark times of the start of modules of our end of October workshop for video editing later

#wpdiversity

Meetup organizer survey for WordCamp US

Hello! We’re hosting the Grow Your Meetup workshop at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US 2019.

To prepare for the workshop, we’re looking for insights and advice from other WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers. What’s worked for you? What hasn’t worked for you?

Take the survey and share your experiences with us.

Note: You don’t need to be attending the workshop to submit a response.

Submissions are anonymous, but you’re welcome to identify yourself for kudos (!), follow-up questions, or to stay in the loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. about the workshop.

Take the survey – the more people we hear from, the better we’ll do.

Thanks in advance…!

#wcus