Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

Improvements to the attendees shortcode

With large WordCamps like WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US, the current implementation of the attendees shortcode becomes a problem. Showing more than 2000 attendees on a single page is not only bad for performance, but also for UX (like scrolling such a long page on a mobile and loading all the attendees including images).

Current performance optimizations

The current implementation of the shortcode has some tricks to increase the performance. For longer attendees lists, they are loaded in batches of 200. The generated HTML of all attendees is cached in a transient for 1 hour (24 hours after the WordCamp).

To help with the attendees Gravatar images, a lazy loading mechanism was implemented. This is very useful not only on desktop, but also helps on mobile saving bandwidth.

Improvements with the new shortcode

For the new default theme the WordCamp Europe team is working on, “CampSite 2017”, we first thought about implementing an archive page for the attendees page. But this would be inflexible and it would also only help the new default theme. The current shortcode also offers some attributes to show content gathered from attendees through additional questions. This would not be as easy with an archive page template. So we instead are trying to improve the shortcode.
Adding pagination to the shortcode
Although the current shortcode has an posts_per_page attribute, this does not add a pagination to the shortcode, but only reduces the number of visible attendees. So that doesn’t help. But we changed this attribute to enable pagination links, if present:

Attendees list with pagination links

The pagination use function paginate_link with accessible links.

Adding a search for attendees

One benefit of having all attendees on a single page is an easy search for them using the browser search. On a paginated page, a search makes it also easy to search for friends and colleagues on the attendees list. Adding the search field can be done with the new with_search attribute set to true:

Attendees list with search field

The search result is also paginated with the same number of attendees per page.

Keeping backward compatibility

As changing the shortcode will affect any WordCamp site, we implemented the new features in a way, that they are only active, if the attributes posts_per_page and/or with_search are set. We also kept the image lazy loading and we still cache the resulting HTML (per page/search) in a transient.

Feedback

For the upcoming WordCamp Europe (June), we would really like to see this new feature available as soon as possible. Please feel free to give us your feedback on the new functionality so we can move forward.

Showing upcoming local events in wp-admin

TL;DR: There’s now a plugin to show upcoming local events in your wp-admin. Test it out and give us feedback!

 

Every few years, someone suggests that it’d be helpful to show upcoming WordCamps and meetup events inside wp-admin, rather than expecting users to find out about those events on their own. Whenever it comes up, almost everyone thinks it’s a great idea, but for one reason or another we’ve just never gotten around to actually doing it.

A few months ago, though, a group of us decided to give it a shot, and we’ve come up with a rough draft. It’s called Nearby WordPress Events, and it’s available in the WordPress.org plugin directory today.

What does it do?

The plugin updates the existing WordPress News dashboard widget to also include upcoming meetup events and WordCamps near the current user’s location. If you have multiple users on your site, each one will be shown the events that are close to their individual location. The dashboard widget will try to automatically detect their location, but they’ll also be able to enter any city they like.

Screenshot of the widget

The WordCamp and meetup event data for the plugin is provided by a new api.wordpress.org endpoint [source, documentation].

Why?

The community that has been created around WordPress is one of its best features, and one of the primary reasons for its success, but many users are still unaware that it exists, and aren’t taking advantage of all of the resources that it makes available to them.

Inviting more people to join the community will help to increase its overall health, diversity, and effectiveness, which in turn helps to ensure that WordPress will continue to thrive in the years to come.

We think that wp-admin is the perfect place to display these events, because that’s the place where almost all WordPress users are visiting already. Instead of expecting them to come to us, we can bring the relevant information directly to them.

What’s next?

The plugin and API endpoint are just rough drafts right now, and haven’t seen any real-world usage yet. We’d love to get your feedback on them, and iterate based on that. We’d especially love to see how well they work for locations outside the United States, languages other than English, and anyone using assistive devices.

Eventually, we’d like to propose merging the dashboard widget into Core, so that every WordPress user in the world will have upcoming local events at their fingertips. 😀

So, what do you think? How well did it work for you? Do you have any suggestions, bug reports, or feature requests?

 

Kudos to everyone who worked to make this a reality: @andreamiddleton, @azaozz, @camikaos, @coreymckrill, @chanthaboune, @courtneypk, @dd32, @iseulde, @mapk, @obenland, @pento, @samuelsidler, @stephdau, @tellyworth

CC +make.wordpress.org/meta, +make.wordpress.org/hosting

#core, #nearby-wordpress-events, #wp-admin

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

WordCamp Status Report (March 2nd to March 8th)

Hello, Community Team! This is a report of all the WordCamp applications that we’ve seen work on this week (from March 2nd to March 8th).

We saw 23 WordCamps with activity this week out of more than 90 applications total. If you’re organizing a WordCamp that isn’t on the list, but you’re still working hard, drop a comment in the weekly update post so we know you’re still okay!

1) 4 new applications that need vetting (6 total)

  • WordCamp Nairobi, Kenya
  • WordCamp New York City, New York
  • WordCamp Varna, Bulgaria
  • WordCamp San Jose, Costa Rica

2) 0 applicants asked to build local community

  • Intentionally left blank.

3) 1 applicant that needs an orientation/interview (4 total)

  • WordCamp Baltimore, Maryland

4) 8 WordCamps moved to pre-planning (29 total)

  • WordCamp Bern, Switzerland
  • WordCamp Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • WordCamp Delhi, India
  • WordCamp for Journalists: Denver
  • WordCamp Johannesburg, South Africa
  • WordCamp Nagpur, India
  • WordCamp Ottawa, Ontario
  • WordCamp San Antonio, Texas

5) 3 WordCamps that need a budget review (4 total)

  • WordCamp Toronto, Ontario
  • WordCamp Ahmedabad, India
  • WordCamp Porto Alegre, Brazil

6) 3 WordCamps (with approved budgets) awaiting contracts (8 total)

  • WordCamp Bucharest, Romania
  • WordCamp Denver, Colorado
  • WordCamp East Greenwich, Rhode Island

7) 1 WordCamp that needs a signed contract (8 total)

  • WordCamp Santander, Spain

8) 0 WordCamps waiting on Central Listing information

  • Good job, organizers! You got your information to us!

9) 2 WordCamps published to the schedule (27 total)

  • WordCamp Minneapolis – St. Paul, Minnesota
  • WordCamp Sacramento, California

10) 2 WordCamps needing debriefs

  • WordCamp Alicante, Spain
  • WordCamp Lancaster, Pennsylvania

If you have questions (or your WordCamp is missing) let us know in the comments!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCamp organizers, Meetup wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in Slack and ask for help!

Requiring WordCamp Speakers to have a WordPress.org account

A team of contributors is working on building a new tool for handling WordCamp speaker submissions. As part of that project, we’ve run into a question that we’d like help from the rest of the Community team to decide.

Should potential WordCamp speakers be required to have a WordPress.org account in order to submit their proposal?

Currently, potential speakers are required to log in before submitting a proposal. Some people feel like that doesn’t offer a substantial benefit, and that it creates a barrier for speakers, especially those outside the WordPress community who can offer valuable perspective. Others feel like having the data is beneficial, and an unwillingness to fulfill a minor requirement might be a red flag that they wouldn’t be a good representative of our community.

Our discussion from September 2015 has more details on the pros and cons. I remember there’ve been more discussion in Slack too, but I couldn’t find them. If you do, please link to them in the comments.

cc @jennybeaumont, @imath, @tomjn, @johnjamesjacoby

February Finance Report

Here’s the monthly update on the payments and income for WordPress community events. This report might get more elaborate as we get the time to build more tools around financial reporting (currently it’s almost entirely manual), so if there’s a level of detail we’re not providing that you’d like to see, please mention it in the comments!

In the month of February 2017, here’s what came in:

Ticket revenue via PayPal: $68,431.36 USD (1,513 total purchases )
Sponsorship income via wire transfer: $275,539.87 USD
Sponsorship income via check: $46,710.00 USD
Sponsorship income via PayPal: $0.00 USD
Sponsorship income via Stripe: $24,297.35

Total revenue (in USD): $414,978.58

As for invoicing in this period:

We sent 79 invoices to local sponsors.
Of those, 55 invoices have been paid and 24 invoices are still outstanding.

And in this same period, here’s what went out:

Total number of vendor payments/reimbursements: 51

Total payments (in USD): $196,041.29

#finance

Dear Meetup Organizers, we need your help with Meetup Video Testimonials

WordPress meetup TestimonialsDear Meetup Organizers

A favorite moment in all WordPress meetups is that time when you meet new WordPress users and hear their stories of how they use WordPress. Sometimes it’s a simple blog, sometimes it’s a complex content management system for news, or a mid sized e-commerce site for their local store front. Whatever the story, it’s always fascinating.

We would like your help in sharing those stories with the WordPress community.

Can you take a few moments to record a video testimonial with one of the attendees at each of your meetups? Nothing fancy, no special cameras, microphones or glaring lights. Just a camera phone and a good, honest story that will inspire others as they search for how to use WordPress for their own projects.

Let’s do this in March and April, folks. WordCamps count, too.

As Dave Navarro says, impromptu videos are best.

“I work for a TV and Radio station in the midwest and I can tell you, from experience, that unpolished raw video has more of an impact on most people in social media than polished professional video.”

Suggested prompts:

  1. How long have you been using WordPress.
  2. What brought you to the Meetup?
  3. How has coming to this Meetup affected you?

Scope:

  • Spontaneous or planned video testimonial.
  • Make sure the lighting is good.
  • Quiet place is best.
  • Have them speak up (good audio).
  • 1-2 minutes is best; max 5 min.
  • Upload to WordPress.tv in the Testimonial Category.
WordPress.tv Testimonial Category for Meetup Marketing

WordPress.tv Testimonial Category for Meetup Marketing

Videos that you lovely meetup organizers upload for the Marketing The Community are here.

Once the videos are accepted and published, share, share, and share!

Love,

The Marketing the Community Team

#video-testimonials