Online WordCamps – Resources, Tools and Information

WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. groups are already moving their events online, and there are guidelines for online do_action charity hackathons as well. The next event series to evolve into this online paradigm is, naturally, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more..

In order to assist organisers with the process of moving their WordCamp online, and to pave the way for new organisers to get involved, the Community Team has set up some tools, processes, and documentation to make things possible. You will find all of this in the new Online Events Handbook, but read on for a broad overview.

Production & Captioning Vendors for All

Since the pilot program for supplying production vendors to online WordCamps was announced, a few WordCamps have taken advantage of this – namely WordCamp Spain, WordCamp Santa Clarita, and the upcoming WordCamp Kent. This pilot program has proved to be a success, which means that all WordCamp organizing teams in 2020 will be able to count on this support.

In practice, this means that the online production and captioning costs associated with any online WordCamp taking place this year will be covered in full without the need for local sponsorship. As an organiser, you can make use of the vendors available or choose to work with a local supplier.

You will find more information in the documentation about production vendors, as well as what to look out for if you do look for local companies.

Updates to WordCamp Guidelines

In order to cater to online WordCamps, the guidelines for these events have been updated to be more flexible and adapt to the needs of the format. You can find these updated guidelines in the new handbook – they cover the regional focus of online events and important changes to the budget review and planning processes.

Note that these updates apply to online events only – when in-person events are able to resume, those events will follow the guidelines that were already in place taking note of these additional guidelines for in-person events taking place in 2020.

Code of Conduct for Online Events

In order to ensure these online events remain as safe and welcoming as in-person WordCamps, the new handbook includes a code of conduct that has been updated to cater to this new format. There is also some new documentation on effective ways to moderate the chat during a live stream and how you can ensure your event’s chat remains friendly and inviting.

Acknowledging Sponsors at Online Events

You can read this handbook page for some excellent ideas about how to acknowledge your online event sponsors, and more information will be published soon with information about recognising global sponsors. One requirement that has been added in here, is that all organisers must have their sponsorship packages approved by a deputy at the budget review stage.

The WordCamp Schedule

The WordCamp schedule has been updated to indicate whether an event is taking place online or not – this will provide an easy reference for anyone interested in attending an online WordCamp no matter where they are in the world. Note that Online WordCamp tickets will always be free, so anyone around the world can easily attend.

Tips for WordCamp Speakers

Since presenting a talk online is a very different experience to doing so in-person, here are some tips for speakers to help you make the most out of the experience.

Guidelines for In-Person WordCamps

If you would like to organise an in-person WordCamp for any date after June 2020, please refer to the updated guidelines for these events.

WordCamps Beyond 2020

The updated guidelines outlined here will be in effect for the remainder of the year. The team plans to review these guidelines in Q3 2020 so that organizers applying for a 2021 WordCamp have greater clarity and enough time to prepare for either an online or in-person event. 


Does this all sound like something you want to get involved in? Fill out the WordCamp organiser application form to get started!

On a personal note, I’m excited to see the online events that local organisers put together – while this is a challenging new frontier for all of us, the need to move our events online will provide a platform for a huge amount of innovation within our community.

Is there anything you think was missed here? Or any other resources or documentation you think would be helpful for the team to provide for organisers of online WordCamps? Please make it known in the comments!

Tuesday Trainings: Practising Open Communication

Strong communication within a local organising team is one of the keys to a well-managed community. When it comes to open-source communities, especially when discussions are almost exclusively held online, making things public will enhance the impact and value of that communication exponentially.

Open communication is, however, an easy thing to forget when it comes down to it – talking about things in private channels is frequently quicker and easier, or at least feels quicker and easier, even if it isn’t. This makes it easy to fall into a pattern of keeping conversations private amongst organisers, although it’s usually done largely out of convenience and speed rather than any sort of intent to hoard control.

Benefits of open communication

In order to push us towards openness, let’s look at some of the benefits of open communication:

Greater community buy-in

When you make decisions in public, people have a much easier time buying into what you have decided, even if they haven’t been involved in the decision-making process. People might not speak up during a discussion, or provide any actual feedback at the time, but the fact that they were able to see the process taking place gives them an inherent bias toward agreement and approval.

Increased engagement

Many of your community members might want to be more engaged, but they struggle to find the time or motivation – this is for a variety of reasons, many of which are out of your control. One thing that you can do to increase engagement, however, is to make your discussions public. Holding conversations in a space where everyone can follow along gives your community members a chance to get involved and to become further engaged. Even if they choose not to take part in a specific conversation, it shows them that they can be a part of your decision-making process, which is a great encouragement for them to remain connected to the community.

More ideas

One of the open-source principles included in the WordPress contributor training is “with many eyes, all bugs are shallow” – this is equally true of community building as it is of software development. If you involve more people in your discussions, then you will have a greater resource of ideas and input to learn from.

Greater trust

Many people have an inherent mistrust of people in power and will frequently second-guess your motivations and decisions, assuming that you are only serving your own interests and not those of the community. You know what your true motivations are, so you need to do what you can to reassure people that they are in good hands. One of the ways you can do that is by discussing things publicly and engaging the community in your conversations. If you do that, it will build trust with the members of your community and they will more readily believe that your motivations are noble and that you are working their best interests in mind.

How to practise open communication

With all of that in mind, and seeing how public discussions can really make your work in your community significantly easier, here are some practical steps you can take to make sure you practise open communication as much as possible.

Use a public SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel

Many organising teams use Slack for their event planning. This is a great idea as it allows you to have a searchable history of your communication as a team. In order to make Slack even more beneficial to you as a team, you can make sure to use a public channel in your community Slack group. You can go a step further and make sure everyone in your community knows this is where you discuss your plans, by advertising the fact that you are using this open space. This goes a long way to maximising all of the benefits we looked at above.

Use a public P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/.

P2 is a WordPress theme designed to create a collaborative space that can effectively replace email (this blog uses a modified version of the P2 theme). Setting up a P2 for your local organising ream to use as a communication space allows all of your conversations to take place in a central location and not be tied into a series of private email threads. You can set up a P2 for free on WordPress.comWordPress.com An online implementation of WordPress code that lets you immediately access a new WordPress environment to publish your content. WordPress.com is a private company owned by Automattic that hosts the largest multisite in the world. This is arguably the best place to start blogging if you have never touched WordPress before. https://wordpress.com/, or simply download and install the theme on any WordPress site.

This allows anyone to follow or comment on your plans with ease. You can even link your P2 to your Slack channel so that all new posts show up in there, maximising their visibility.

Publish meeting notes

Even if you maintain public spaces, like Slack and P2, there will always be conversations that happen on calls or in other areas that are not open to everyone. In those instances, you can use your P2 as a record of these meetings by publishing notes and summaries of what you spoke about. This allows all of your discussions to be publicly available for review and comment. You can, of course, remain selective about what you publish in your notes, so sensitive matters can still be kept private where necessary.

Ask the community

One of the keys to soliciting quality feedback, especially in a public forum like a P2, is to ask the right questions to the right people. With a public place for discussions, you can ask your community for their input on your work and gather input from a variety of sources. When doing so, you need to keep your questions specific and open-ended. You should ask for feedback about individual decisions but ask for further input, rather than simply gathering yes/no answers. This way you will allow your community to be involved in decisions that will affect them, and you will be able to pull together useful and actionable feedback.

Do you have any other tips for how to practise genuine open communication? Share them below!

#tuesdaytrainings

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Schedule Block Available for Beta Testing

The Schedule block is now available for betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. testing on WordCamp.org. It will replaces the [schedule] shortcode, as a way to automatically generate a front end schedule based on the Sessions custom post typeCustom Post Type WordPress can hold and display many different types of content. A single item of such a content is generally called a post, although post is also a specific post type. Custom Post Types gives your site the ability to have templated posts, to simplify the concept..

Kudos to @mrwweb for building an innovative prototype, @melchoyce for the design, and everyone who helped refine the ideas in previous discussions.

Screenshot of the Schedule block

Please leave comment below if you’d like to help with beta testing.

If you’re not currently planning a camp, you can use one of your older sites, or ask for access to a test site.

The new blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. doesn’t currently support the personalized schedule feature that the shortcodeShortcode A shortcode is a placeholder used within a WordPress post, page, or widget to insert a form or function generated by a plugin in a specific location on your site. has, but that will be incorporated before the block is enabled for all sites.

Testing Details

  1. Leave a comment below, and include the URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org of a past- or present- WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. that you helped organize. I’ll enable the block for that site.
  2. Edit the Session posts and update the duration field, if needed. If you skip this step, you’ll probably see a lot of warnings while using the block.
  3. Draft or publish a new page, and add the block to it. Please share a link to this page in the comments, so myself and everyone can see the results.
  4. Play around with the various options, and keep an eye out for bugs, missing features, pain points, etc. I’m especially interested to see if anyone runs into problems applying custom CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. to it, and any tweaks that would make that easier.
  5. If you have any feedback, please leave a comment below, or open an issue on GitHub.

Thanks!

+make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.

#beta, #blocks, #schedule, #wordcamp-org

Feedback request for WordCamp Organizers: How do you use your WordCamp email address?

The Community Team is looking for feedback from former/current WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers about how they use their existing city@wordcamp.org email addresses. 

The Problem

WordCamp organizers are currently provided with city-based @wordcamp.org email addresses. Once the WordCamp is approved, deputies set up an email forward for the event in the format of city@wordcamp.org to the organizer’s email address (or another email address created and managed by the organizing team). The team also offers access to a webmail client if organizers wish to send mail from the city@wordcamp.org address directly. However, the webmail client is not very user-friendly and doesn’t work well when multiple people are using it.

Potential Solution and Request for Feedback

The WordPress Foundation now has a G Suite for Non-profits account. This account can be used for @wordcamp.org accounts, as well as email addresses for the Foundation itself. The Community Team is evaluating whether we can use G Suite to replace the existing cPanel-based webmail clients for both new and existing city@wordcamp.org email accounts.

Before we consider implementing G Suite for WordCamp emails, we would like to hear from WordCamp organizers about how they work with emails using the existing tools (the webmail clients and email forwarding). In short, we are trying to get more clarity on the pain-points that we are looking to solve. 

We are seeking your input to help us arrive at an informed decision on whether to switch to an email client like G Suite for processing WordCamp emails. If you are a current/former WordCamp organizer, can you answer the following questions for us?

  1. How much do you use the city@wordcamp.org email address? 
  2. What are the benefits of this provided email account over other options? 
  3. What are the current pain points of using this email account? 
  4. What other 3rd-party tools do you regularly use, and perhaps pay for, because there’s no suitable tool available from WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each.
  5. Do you see any benefits in preserving emails from previous years in the email account?
  6. How does your organizing team handle sharing access to your WordCamp email account?

Please let us know your answers in the comments by Monday, June 8 2020. Thanks for helping us think through how we can best support our WordPress community organizers by improving our tools!

X-post: WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day: All that team facilitators and experienced Contributors need to know

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day: All that team facilitators and experienced Contributors need to know

do_action Japan 2020 Virtual Charity Hackathon Recap

Last weekend, about 70 Japanese WordPress community members and 9 non-profit organizations came together and built websites for our first do_action event.

This was also the first-ever virtual charity hackathon in do_action’s 5-year history. In this recap, I want to share some tips and findings for future organizers (read this in Japanese | 日本語版はこちら).

Continue reading

Community Team Chat Agenda | May 21 2020

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 21 May 2020. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, 21 May 2020, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, 21 May 2020, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

  • Youth Event Working Group Chat/Office Hours May 7, 2020 posted by Sandy Edwards – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/07/youth-event-working-group-chat-office-hours-may-7-2020/
  • Request for Feedback: Which email newsletter service should we use? posted by Hari Shanker – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/08/request-for-feedback-which-email-newsletter-service-should-we-use/
  • Update: Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship for WordCamp US 2020 posted by Angela Jin – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/08/update-kim-parsell-memorial-scholarship-for-wordcamp-us-2020/
  • Call for Participants: Diverse Speaker Workshops and Coaching in May & June posted by Jill Binder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/09/call-for-participants-diverse-speaker-workshops-and-coaching-in-may-june/
  • Financial update on WordPress community programs posted by Kevin Cristiano – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/11/financial-update-on-wordpress-community-programs/
  • Tuesday Trainings: a new series! posted by Cami Kaos – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/12/tuesday-trainings-a-new-series/
  • Recap of the Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) on May 13, 2020 posted by Jill Binder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/14/recap-of-the-diverse-speaker-training-group-wpdiversity-on-may-13-2020/
  • In-person WordCamps in 2020 posted by Angela Jin – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/14/in-person-wordcamps-in-2020/
  • Meetup Organizer Newsletter: Online Events Edition posted by Hari Shanker R – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/15/meetup-organizer-newsletter-online-events-edition-2/
  • Tuesday Trainings: Online Event Formats posted by Courtney P.K. – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/19/tuesday-trainings-online-event-formats/

Highlighted P2 posts

  • Online WordCamps – Resources, Tools and Information posted by Hugh Lashbrooke – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/05/14/online-wordcamps-resources-tools-and-information/

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#meeting-agenda, #team-chat

Tuesday Trainings: Online Event Formats

With things ever-changing for our events program within this global pandemic, it feels appropriate to focus the first installment of our Tuesday Trainings on our online events program. Just as we’re adjusting different aspects of our lives while our home communities are working on physical distancing, the Global Community Team is continuing to work on ways to continue bringing the WordPress community together.

Community deputies have currently turned most of our attention to how best to support organizers in focusing on online events. For a primer as you get started, deputies have prepared a new handbook for online events

In this handbook, you will find guidelines for online events, tools for online Meetups and WordCamps, additional available resources, and our code of conduct for online events. This handbook is constantly being updated, so be sure to bookmark it for future reference.

What hasn’t been shared yet are recommendations for formats of events that can be hosted online to continue to benefit your local communities during this time of physical distancing. Here are some ideas that MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers have tried, which you can use for inspiration!

Online Meetup Events

  • Invite speakers from your community to deliver their session remotely, using Zoom, Hangouts, Skype, or other free online meeting tools.
  • Invite speakers from other Meetups to deliver their session remotely, using online meetup tools.
  • Play talks of interest from WordPress.tv during the Meetup event.
  • Online Lightning Talks are a great way to help new speakers and encourage participation.
  • Online Q & A sessions at Meetup events are always a good way to help the audience with specific questions and find out what their interests are.
  • Online Help Desk:  Members ask for help with their WordPress sites, and other members support them.
  • Online co-working hour: Have an online meeting where members drop in and work alongside each other — like a virtual co-working space or coffee shop.

Online WordCamps

  • Invite speakers to present sessions online.
  • Invite speakers to pre-record content on a video to stream during the live online event.
  • Support Desks to support folx in your community with questions needing individualized attention.
  • Host interactive Trivia games.
  • Virtual Hallway Tracks in Zoom rooms to encourage conversation and serendipitous meetings.

Additional Online Event Types

Have you tried any event types not listed here? Do you have additional ideas for online event formats? Please share your ideas and feedback in the comments section!

#tuesdaytrainings

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Meetup Organizer Newsletter: Online Events Edition

Hello friends,

We are happy to share with you another meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizer newsletter, packed full of information about upcoming online events, along with news, information, and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • New resources for online and in-person events during COVID-19
  • Upcoming Online Events
  • Training Tuesdays
  • Call for Content for the Youth Working Group

New Resources for Online and In-Person Events during COVID-19

The WordPress Community has begun to host online Meetups, and there are guidelines for online do_action charity hackathons. Now, the Community Team has prepared a new set of guidelines for online WordCamps, and for in-person events during COVID-19. 

Online WordCamps – Resources, Tools, and Information

In order to assist organizers with the process of moving their WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. online, and to pave the way for new organizers to get involved, the Community Team has set up some tools, processes, and documentation to make things possible.

We are providing online production and captioning costs associated with any online WordCamp taking place this year will be covered in full without the need for local sponsorship. You will find more information in the documentation about production vendors, as well as what to look out for if you do look for local companies. We’ve updated our guidelines to cover the regional focus of online events and important changes to the budget review and planning processes.

The handbook also includes a code of conduct that has been updated to cater to this new format. There is also some new documentation on effective ways to moderate the chat during a live stream and how you can ensure your event’s chat remains friendly and inviting. We also have a handbook page that shares some excellent ideas about how to acknowledge your online event sponsors, along with some tips for speakers at online events.

The WordCamp schedule has been updated to indicate whether an event is taking place online or not, and we also have tips for WordCamp speakers

In-Person WordCamps

When in-person events are able to resume, those events will follow the guidelines that were already in place, taking note of these additional guidelines for in-person events taking place in 2020. The Global Community Team is planning to keep these guidelines in place until Q4 2020, at which point we’ll revisit and reassess depending on the situation at that time.

Upcoming Online Events

All the upcoming online events from WordPress meetup groups are shown on this page – times will be shown in your local time zone unless otherwise noted. Feel free to participate in any event to see what other meetup groups are doing! For tips on how to organize an online meetup, visit this handbook page

WCUS Call for Speakers and Interactive Office Hours

WordCamp US 2020 will take place online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The event still runs from October 27-29, 2020, and will be free to anyone who wishes to attend. 

At this time, the Call for Speakers is still open! You can apply to speak on the speaker application site until May 31, 2020 at 11:59 pm CDT (UTC-5). The WCUS programming team is holding an interactive office hours this Saturday, May 16th at 11:00 am CDT (UTC-5) to help prospective speakers learn more about WCUS attendees and brainstorm topics for their talk. This interactive session will be held in the Make WordPress Slack. For more information and to sign up, visit this post. This session will be followed by a second interactive office hours dedicated to helping prospective speakers create and submit their pitch, so follow the blog for the latest info. 

Bonus! The Call for Cities is also open. If your community is interested in hosting WordCamp US in 2021 & 2022, please fill out this application

WordCamp Europe

The biggest WordCamp in Europe is now fully online, including Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.! The event will be on June 4-6, 2020, and you can get the latest updates on their website, or by following #WCEU. Don’t forget to get your free tickets for WordCamp Europe now!

WordCamp Kent Online

On May 30-31, 2020, the northeast Ohio WordPress community will come together online for the first online edition of WordCamp Kent. You can get your free tickets for WordCamp Kent Online now!

Diverse Speaker Workshops and Coaching

The Diverse Speaker Training Group (#WPDiversity) is holding workshops and group coaching sessions in May and June. The workshop series will help dispel some myths about being a speaker, help you find a topic, create a great pitch, and provide tips for public speaking and being on camera. Participants are encouraged to attend all three workshops in the given week (the series will be run in May and again in June). In addition, there will be Group Coaching sessions where participants can get help with anything related to public speaking at WordPress events! These sessions are intended to train speakers who are members of a marginalized or underrepresented group in terms of gender, race, class, sexuality, ability, age, etc. For details on dates and times, and for additional information about these sessions, please read this post. If you are interested in participating, please sign up here.

Highlighted Online Meetup:  

In this section, we try to highlight the experiences shared by meetup organizers, about their experiences while organizing an online event. 

Sam Suresh from the Kuala Lumpur WordPress Meetup group shared his experiences about the first edition of their online event: MCO: WordPress Meetup via Zoom

The meetup draws its title from the Movement Control Order (MCO) issued by the Malaysian Government to enforce a lockdown in the country. This was the first online event organized by the meetup group, and over 50 people attended the live event hosted on Zoom. The event had four speakers who each spoke for 20 minutes, followed by a 10 minute Q&A. The organizers also live-streamed the event using the Facebook Live platform, in order to attain a wider reach. Attendees found the event enjoyable and they are planning to organize more online events in the future!

Would you like to share your experiences with organizing online events? Let us know!

Training Tuesdays

WordPress Community deputies and volunteers are creating a new series of content to share knowledge and help to train organizers and interested community members in a variety of skills, while also adding additional training documentation to our handbooks. The content will come in a variety of formats including blog posts, recorded presentations, discussions, and workshops. Each week on Tuesday a different topic will be highlighted on the WordPress Community Blog here with the #tuesdaytrainings tag. For more information, visit the announcement post. If you’d like to contribute your knowledge for a Tuesday Training, please email support@wordcamp.org 

Call for Content for the Youth Working Group

The Youth Working Group team is looking for individuals to contribute 5-10 minute video or video snippets that cover doing something with WordPress. This could be short instructional screencasts from the WordPress dashboard, or a short tutorial that depicts how one can build something fun and creative using WordPress. If you would like to contribute to the project, please pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” Sandy Edwards (@sunsand187) directly in the Make WordPress Slack. If you do not mind the video being used for WCUS KidsCamp, you can apply to speak here: https://2020.wcus-speakers.org/. If you have any questions, you can get them answered at the Youth Events office hours that happen weekly on Thursdays at 2100 UTC/5 pm EST in the the #community-events channel of the Make WordPress Slack

If you have any questions, Community Team deputies are available to help. Please send an email to support@wordcamp.org or join the #community-events SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel.

Thanks for everything you do to grow the WordPress community, let’s keep sharing knowledge and inspiring our Open SourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. Community! 

We’ll see you online soon!

#newsletter