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Make WordPress Community

Welcome to the official blog of the community/outreach team for the WordPress open source project!

This team oversees official events, mentorship programs, diversity initiatives, contributor outreach, and other ways of growing our community.

If you love WordPress and want to help us do these things, join in!

Getting Involved

We use this blog for status reports, project announcements, and the occasional policy debate. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to comment on posts and join the discussion.

You can learn about our current activities on the Team Projects page. There projects are suitable for everyone from newcomers to WordPress community elders.

You can use our contact form to volunteer for one of our projects.

Communication

In addition to discussions on this blog, we have weekly Office Hours on Tuesdays at 20:00 UTC and Thursdays at 20:00 UTC in the #events channel on Slack for real-time communication.

• Tuesdays: Meetups and Volunteering
• Thursdays: WordCamps and Finances

Recent Updates Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Cami Kaos 6:00 pm on March 26, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Thursday happenings! 

    Community chat at 19:00 UTC

    Office hours with Cami at 20:00 UTC. Today’s topics are WordCamps and finances!

     
    • Lydia Rogers 6:08 pm on March 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi – This is my first time attending this meeting. I’m one of the organizers for the Providence (Rhode Island) WordCamp. Lydia

    • Cami Kaos 6:29 pm on March 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Welcome Lydia! We’ll be chatting on slack in #outreach. For the community chat our active community teams will update us on how the individual projects are progressing.

      During office hours you can ask any WordCamp or WordCamp and Meetup group finance questions you may have in #events or by sending a PM to @camikaos.

  • Caspar 3:47 pm on March 23, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    I’ve visualized a couple of premises and thoughts re: commhub as a result of contributor day at WordCamp London. There’s also a poll on polyglots to evaluate whether these thoughts are of meaning in general, or an edge case.

    commhub-core-premise

    commhub-rosetta

     
  • Michael 12:29 pm on March 20, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: WordPress.tv ( 326 )

    WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update 

    “We are trying to construct a more inclusive society…. We are going to make a country in which no one is left out.”
    – Franklin D. Roosevelt

    The Pending queue has videos to moderate. We are getting new videos from WordCamp Toronto.
    This is a busy month for WordCamps with 5 this month, so we will have many more videos coming.

    In the Mod Chat we talked about:

    • update on getting ready to offer post-production services to WordCamps
    • policy about offensive language used in videos
    • issue at WordCamp Happiness Bars dealing with some attendees feeling intimidated and how to be more inclusive.

    In The Last 7 Days

    We published 14 videos from 6 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

    The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

    Christina Fuchs: Was sind Mitgliederseiten und wie lassen sie sich in WordPress realisieren?

    Alina Kakshapati: Build WordPress as a Career

    Sakar Upadhyaya Khatiwada: Because Website Speed Matters

     
  • Josepha 10:04 pm on March 19, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: Community Management ( 26 )

    Community Chat Recap | March 19, 2015 

    Slack Log (Requires Slack login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account.) Next week’s chat will stay at 19:00 UTC. No change for Daylight Savings Time in the US.

    This week’s chat consisted of a couple really good discussions. We heard updates about the ModSquad and WordCamp site improvements. Here are the team highlights:

    From WPTV (@jerrysarcastic)

    • Post-production for WordCamp videos is being offered by the ModSquad and they are looking for contributors to participate. All it takes is a laptop, time to help, and some direction which you can find here:  https://wptvdocs.wordpress.com/
    • Once the process is all streamlined, we’d like to have this announced in opening and closing remarks at Camps. Also in Contributor Days.
    • Follow Up Questions
      • @hlashbrooke: What’s the best way to get raw footage to [WPTV] if the internet connection is poor?
        • Jerry: No solution just yet, but have discussed sending physical media.
        • Ian: What are the blockers for mailing? Cost. Countries that don’t have FedEx to use our account.
        • Jerry: It’s worth considering having the drives on hand to send out to people who need them.

    From Improving WordCamp.org (@iandunn)

    For more information on this and other meeting times, check out the sidebar and the Welcome box on https://make.wordpress.org/community/.

     
  • Michael 12:30 pm on March 13, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: WordPress.tv ( 325 )

    WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update 

    “If A is success in life, then A = x + y + z. Work is x, play is y and z is keeping your mouth shut.”
    – Albert Einstein

    The Pending queue has been growing and we have videos to moderate. We are still getting videos from WordCamp Maui. We have videos from WordCamp Nepal, WordCamp Cape Town and WordCamp Orlando in the queue. We also have some NYC meetup videos to moderate.

    In the Mod Chat we talked about:

    • what videos are in the Pending queue
    • progress is being made in editing videos and cutting in slides

    In The Last 7 Days

    We published 35 videos from 7 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

    The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

    Christina Fuchs: Was sind Mitgliederseiten und wie lassen sie sich in WordPress realisieren?

    Sara Cannon: Smart Design

    Jonathan Buttigieg: Pourquoi vous devriez vendre un plugin/thème premium

     
    • Caspar 3:42 pm on March 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for sharing those top 3, @roseapplemedia! Thinking about how awesome it would be if those folks would get a notification somehow when their presentations hit top 3. Shared it on G+ for now. 😉

      • Michael 3:53 pm on March 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Nice idea but other than the video submitter, there is no contact information available for that with the video.

        • Caspar 5:21 pm on March 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Well, I’ll keep sharing manually whenever I see a name that looks familiar. Keeps me engaged. 😉

  • Cami Kaos 6:01 pm on March 12, 2015 Permalink |  
    Categories: Community Management ( 26 )

    Community Chat and Office Hours Today! 

    A reminder that Community Chat is coming up at 19:00 UTC.

    And at 20:00 UTC you can join Josepha and I for office hours. Today’s topics are WordCamps and Finances. We have no formal agenda but will be hanging out in #events if you have any questions.

     
  • Josepha 6:04 pm on March 10, 2015 Permalink |  
    Categories: Community Management ( 24 ), Events ( 7 ), Meetups ( 25 ), Mentorship Programs ( 13 )

    Office Hours Today! 

    A reminder to the Community that Cami and I have office hours today starting at 20:00 UTC in the #events channel on Slack. We will be discussing Meetups and Volunteering, so stop by if you have any questions about those topics!

    For more information on this and other meeting times, check out the sidebar and the Welcome box on https://make.wordpress.org/community/.

    <edit>
    I should mention that there is no formal agenda. We will be available to answer any questions you have, but will not be posing questions on our own. :)
    </edit>

     
  • Michael 2:40 pm on March 6, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: WordPress.tv ( 324 )

    WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update 

    “Don’t be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.'”
    –  Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Videos from WordCamp Nepal and WordCamp Cape Town are in the queue and are ready for moderation.
    And videos from NYC meetup will be submitted soon.

    In the Mod Chat we talked about:

    • the Pending queue is starting to fill with videos for moderating
    • compressing videos to accommodate the 1GB size limit
    • update on contacting WordPress meetups for video submissions

    In The Last 7 Days

    We published 22 videos from 5 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

    The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

    Kevin Fodness: Object-Oriented Theme Development

    Sara Cannon: Smart Design

    Aurélien Denis: Industrialiser sa maintenance sous WordPress

     
  • Josepha 10:07 pm on March 5, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Categories: Community Management ( 23 )

    Community Chat Recap | March 5, 2015 

    Slack Log (Requires Slack login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account.) Next week’s chat will stay at 19:00 UTC. No change for Daylight Savings Time in the US.

    This week’s chat was short, but naturally sweet. We heard updates about the ModSquad, Training, CommHub, Meetups, and WordCamp site improvements. Here are the team highlights:

    • ModSquad (@jerrysarcastic) – not many videos at the moment, contacting large WordCamps that post on YouTube to see if they will also post to WPTV. Looking for good videos from Meetup events if anyone has them!
    • Tracy (@liljimmi) – Reps from the Training team presented at WCLanc and it was a great success. Take a look at the slides; you’re encouraged to use them at your local Contributor Days!
    • Jenny (@miss_jwo) – Got the description complete and posted! The team is using Balsamiq to make wireframes this week.
    • Josepha (@chanthaboune) – Meetups are on the move again. Will start with the oldest requests first.
    • Ian (@iandunn) – Has notes from the Summit. Will be posting those in the next day or two!
    • Cami (@camikaos) – Adding office hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 20:00 UTC in #events. Tuesday topics are Meetups and Volunteering, Thursday topics are WordCamps and Finances. This will begin on Tuesday March 10, 2015.

    For more information on this and other meeting times, check out the sidebar and the Welcome box on https://make.wordpress.org/community/.

    Office Hours Discussion – The concern about timezones and office hours has been raised. We’re going to start with 20:00 UTC, then monitor and adjust. Feel free to add any concerns or questions you have about Office Hours in the comments below!

     
  • Ian Dunn 10:04 pm on March 5, 2015 Permalink |  
    Categories: Official Websites ( 5 )

    Improving WordCamp.org: User Experience of the CSS Editor 

    One of the discussions we had at the 2014 Community Summit was about customizing WordCamp.org sites, and we identified some of the worst pain-points that organizers currently have.

    One of those problems was that customizing a theme’s CSS is difficult and frustrating. Currently, organizers use Jetpack’s CSS Editor, which works well for small tweaks, but isn’t really intended for the types of major overhauls that most WordCamps are doing. Some of the biggest problems are:

    • There isn’t any post-locking or version control, so it’s easy for two users to accidentally overwrite each other’s changes
    • Saving edits requires a page refresh, which makes you lose your place. With larger rulesets, finding your place again takes too long and often breaks mental “flow”, which is frustrating.
    • The browser’s built-in Find functionality doesn’t always work
    • The rules can’t be modularized into small, manageable files — and then recombined during processing — for easier development and maintenance.
    • Many consider editing in a browser to be a subpar experience to using an IDE with features like code-completion
    • Cross-browser/device testing can’t be easily done with the Preview functionality
    • Syncing between production and a local testing environment has to be done manually
    • Time-saving tools like LiveReload can’t be used.
    • There are two scroll bars (one for the page itself, and then another inside the editor), which makes using the scroll wheel on a mouse annoying.

    So, how do you think we should move forward and made it easier for organizers to customize their theme’s CSS?

     
    • Ian Dunn 10:06 pm on March 5, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      One approach to addressing those problems would be to submit pull requests to Jetpack, adding features like post-locking (to minimize accidental overwrites) and saving via AJAX (to avoid losing your place during page refreshes).

      I don’t think we’ll realistically be able to address all of the issues with that approach, though, so another approach would be to build an alternative solution that organizers can use if they don’t want to use Jetpack.

      So, I think we need to answer a couple questions:

      1) If we improve the Jetpack CSS editor as much as we realistically can, will that be good enough, or will there still be significant pain points?
      2) If Jetpack’s CSS Editor can’t meet our needs, what ideas do we have for an alternative solution?

      cc @georgestephanis, to get the perspective of someone on the Jetpack team

      • Ian Dunn 8:00 pm on March 11, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I think we need to decide on the questions in my comment above in order to move forward with this project. What does everyone think about the two potential approaches?

        @ryelle, @harbormark, @chanthaboune, @nvwd, @kovshenin, @rafaehlers, @davidjlaietta, @dimensionmedia, @mj12982, @iandstewart, @miss_jwo, @topher1kenobe, @georgestephanis, @adamsilverstein, @pixolin

        • David Bisset 2:41 am on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I’ve read through as much of this as I could. I definitely see the pros and cons in both choices. As someone who usually works in more complex setups, I tend to favor using a non-Jetpack solution (or perhaps more accurately, something where i’m not limited to a web browser interface exclusively). That being said, i’m not objecting to a better experience with Jetpack but that’s not my personal first choice.

          Either way, there needs to be a better way to manage the CSS that needs to be generated for more “creative” designs (or as creative as we can get if we are limited to the WordPress themes and unable to modify theme templates). The more creative generally the more CSS (or at least it’s complexity). If this was me setting up a theme I would do it similar to how the _s theme has it’s Sass files organized into different folders.

          There’s also something for saying that it’s nice to work in your own IDE that you are used to.

          Hope that was feedback that warranted your attention. I think the main thing here is that there’s pain and we need an aspirin.

        • Bego Mario Garde 7:40 am on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          As mentioned before, I don’t see handling custom CSS with Jetpack as a big issue really. It’s support for SASS is great and the pet peeves you mentioned may exist yet aren’t as severe that I would see them as a real issue.

          Now that I know how to set up a WordCamp site in a local sandbox, I can easily do some test drives before publishing to the public. That already helps much and I appreciate you added the information to the website that describes the setup process.

          It would also be a great help for WordCamp Organizers to have at least one clean custom stylesheet per theme included in the setup to have a better start.

          • Ian Dunn 5:51 pm on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Thanks Bego, can you describe your idea of a starter custom stylesheet a bit more? What kind of changes would it make to the default theme? I can’t think of anything that would be useful to all camps, since they all create such different designs.

        • David Laietta 12:20 pm on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I believe that many camps have more to think about than just their websites, and don’t necessarily have time to develop something from scratch. If a library of code from camps that elect to upload it is available, it would go a long way toward camps without dedicated web teams being able to make a good looking site with minimal effort.

          Basically I’m proposing a library of child themes with sufficient code to start editing. The child themes would only have to consist of existing CSS that camps have already created, meaning it could be sourced and vetted before posting, cutting down on development time.

        • Josepha 2:26 pm on March 17, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          +1 to David L’s comment. We don’t want to make it so that people who are lacking a heavy-hitting design or development portion of their team aren’t able to have a nice WordCamp site. If removing Jetpack will make that harder, I am in favor of the other option.

          • Ian Dunn 6:32 pm on March 17, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            I don’t think we’d ever remove Jetpack; any other system we’d build would be an optional alternative, but organizers could still use Jetpack if they preferred.

            Also, the prototype that Kelly built for cloning another WordCamp’s theme looks like it’ll be a great tool for camps that don’t have the time/contributors to re-design their site (regardless of which tools are available to do that).

    • Ian Dunn 10:07 pm on March 5, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If we decide that iterating on Jetpack’s CSS editor won’t be enough, one idea for an alternative solution would be to try and achieve a workflow that is closer to traditional local development. We could create folders in the Meta Subversion repository to store CSS files for each camp, and organizers could commit a CSS file to it, along with any SASS/LESS files that they want.

      An mu-plugin running on WordCamp.org would look for a CSS in the current site’s respective folder, and enqueue it if one exists. A cachebusting parameter could be added to the URL’s filename during enqueue, based on the file’s modified time. After a commit, the file(s) could be updated on production via a post-commit hook or a cron job that runs frequently.

      I think that would address all of the problems mentioned in the post, because it would allow organizers to checkout the file(s) to their local environment, use the editor and tools of their choice, easily collaborate with other developers, and test across devices and browsers before committing changes.

      We’d need to figure out a way to automatically create the folders when new sites are created, and assign the proper permissions to the respective WordPress.org users, but I think the WordPress.org plugin directory may have some similar functionality that could be reused.

      One problem with this approach is that, when using selectors like `body.page-id-X`, the IDs might not match between production and development. It’s not too hard to change them locally to match, though, so I don’t think that’s a big deal.

      • Ian Dunn 11:00 pm on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        George made a good point related to this idea; instead of enqueuing the stylesheet directly from an mu-plugin, we should probably pass the contents of the CSS file in the SVN repo through Jetpack’s CSS Editor.

        IE7 — and somer newer IE versions running in compatibility mode — have security vulnerabilities that will execute JavaScript that’s injected into CSS via expressions, etc, so passing it through Jetpack would sanitize it for us.

        One potential problem with that approach is that any changes that an admin makes through Jetpack would then have to be manually synced to the canonical file in the SVN repo; otherwise they’d get overwritten.

      • Konstantin Kovshenin 5:11 pm on March 16, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I like the idea of a repository where organizers could commit stylesheets, but as George mentioned, there are some security concerns.

        Below you mentioned a problem where one would overwrite the stylesheet via the admin interface. I think it’s a non-issue, because we wouldn’t really be storing the resulting CSS in the same option as the Jetpack Custom CSS one, we’d simply be using the Jetpack functions to sanitize the CSS and output it in addition to the original Custom CSS stylesheet.

        I do see a little issue with deploying though. If we run a 15-minute cron to svn up the custom stylesheets directory, then folks working on WordCamp sites without a local environment would commit their CSS changes directly, but would have to wait up to 15 minutes for each change to go live. We could probably try and avoid this by auto-svn-up-on-post-commit or something along those lines.

        • Ian Dunn 6:56 pm on March 16, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Yeah, making it an additional thing rather than trying to them it w/ Jetpack’s option sounds like a better idea.

          I was thinking the cron job would run approximately every minute (or less) but I agree that a post-commit hook would be ideal.

    • George Stephanis 10:10 pm on March 5, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      > There isn’t any post-locking or version control, so it’s easy for two users to accidentally overwrite each other’s changes

      Post locking would be worth seeing about adding in, but there is some version control-ish — insofar as it uses a custom post type and saves revisions.

      > Saving edits requires a page refresh, which makes you lose your place. With larger rulesets, finding your place again takes too long and often breaks mental “flow”, which is frustrating.

      One of my long-time annoyances — it should be a relatively easy fix to make. Maybe store the scroll position in sessionStorage?

      > The browser’s built-in Find functionality doesn’t always work

      Any idea what doesn’t catch or why / in what situations it doesn’t take?

      > Cross-browser/device testing can’t be easily done with the Preview functionality

      Could be handled with a third-party plugin that somewhat mirrors [share-a-draft](https://wordpress.org/plugins/shareadraft/)

      > Time-saving tools like LiveReload can’t be used.

      How would you feel if we put it into the Customizer, to let folks see it refresh as they go?

      • Ian Dunn 2:16 am on March 6, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Post locking would be worth seeing about adding in, but there is some version control-ish — insofar as it uses a custom post type and saves revisions.

        That’s true. It can still be kind of hard to work with, though, especially with ~1,500 lines of CSS, because the browser shows the entire “post”. rather than only what’s changed, and then double-spaces everything, which makes it hard to find what you’re looking for.

        It also doesn’t do any syntax-highlighting like the main editor does, but to be fair, neither does the default svn diff.

        I think it’d be good if the author of the revision was shown in the meta box, to make it easy to tell if someone else has recently made changes at a glance.

        One of my long-time annoyances — it should be a relatively easy fix to make. Maybe store the scroll position in sessionStorage?

        That could work, but it might be jarring to have the page jump to a new position once the JS finishes loading. A progressive enhancement to save via AJAX would maintain the scroll position and also avoid having to reload the page.

        Any idea what doesn’t catch or why / in what situations it doesn’t take?

        Nope, it probably only happens to me about 40% of the time. I haven’t noticed a pattern yet, though.

        Could be handled with a third-party plugin that somewhat mirrors [share-a-draft](https://wordpress.org/plugins/shareadraft/)

        Yeah, that’s a good idea :)

        How would you feel if we put it into the Customizer, to let folks see it refresh as they go?

        Yeah, that’d probably be a step forward. The small area available makes it hard to work with any lines longer than 30 characters, but the live update on WordPress.com is really nice.

        LiveReload is just one example, though; there are lots of other tools out there.

        One more thing I just remembered is the double scroll on the Editor page (once on the page itself, and then again inside the editor). Integrating the new editor scrolling behavior from 4.0 might be a good way to tackle that.

        • George Stephanis 4:45 pm on March 6, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Yeah, that’d probably be a step forward. The small area available makes it hard to work with any lines longer than 30 characters, but the live update on WordPress.com is really nice.

          Part of me wants to just post it to a popup with a nonce and let them view the current status quo in that window instead. Or something.

          One more thing I just remembered is the double scroll on the Editor page (once on the page itself, and then again inside the editor). Integrating the new editor scrolling behavior from 4.0 might be a good way to tackle that.

          That’d be brilliant.

          • Ian Dunn 7:22 pm on March 6, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Cool, I’ll add the editor scrolling to the list in the post, so we don’t forget it if we decide to iterate on Jetpack instead of building an alternative.

        • Ian Dunn 4:31 pm on March 17, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Any idea what doesn’t catch or why / in what situations it doesn’t take?

          I think I figured out how to reproduce this in Chrome 41. It basically won’t find it unless it’s already been scrolled to inside the container.

          1. Load the Edit CSS page
          2. Search for a string of text that you know exists in the CSS container, but isn’t currently visible in the scroll viewport. The browser won’t find it.
          3. Scroll down to where the string is visible
          4. Add or remove a character from the search query so that the browser re-starts the search. The browser will find it.

          I can reproduce it on lancasterpa/2015 with a query for “jetpack_subscription” if you want to try for yourself.

    • Adam Silverstein 1:10 am on March 6, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      One possible enhancement to address your concerns: adding revisions to the css editor; this plugin does something similar for the theme/plugin edit screens: https://wordpress.org/plugins/code-revisions

      • Ian Dunn 2:18 am on March 6, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Actually, George pointed out that I was wrong; it already has the Core revision browser. I just added a reply to his comment that notes some issues with it that make it worse than a real version control system, though.

    • Bego Mario Garde 7:13 am on March 7, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I just had the pleasure to tweak the Website for WordCamp Cologne (http://cologne.wordcamp.org/2015/). Handling the customization wasn’t really the issue, although I also had to make my way through the pet peeves, which Ian Dunn mentions in this post.

      What I wish most is, I could simply backup and clone the website in a local sand box environment to test things and get more certainty in publishing things (after all you don’t want to end as the fool who broke the WordCamp website).

      I then tried to at least rebuild the website and found Konstantin Kovshenin’s Camptix plugin in the WordPress plugin repository, but couldn’t find the plugin that sets up various Custom Post Types (for e.g. wcb_schedule, wcb_sponsors, etc) and the shortcodes to embed the custom content. I soon will need to work on the schedule of our event. As I don’t know the HTML output yet, I currently have no idea about the styling until I get to the point to set up some test data in the productive site.

      Not knowing the output can get somewhat tricky. Our sponsor agreements include that “Community Sponsors” get listed on a web page “sponsors” with a link to their website, but their package doesn’t include any text. If you just use the WordCamp setup provided for sponsors, they get listed in the provided sponsor-widget, which then doesn’t link to their website but an – empty – archive page of the post type. Once you understand the logic behind it, you can easily solve the issue by setting their entry in the widget to display:none in the stylesheet. Yet I had to learn that the hard way (after complaints of a sponsor).

      At one of our organizers meeting we talked about adding a sticky post with some introductory text about the event. To show how it would embed (I’m really fast if people ask me for help) I quickly added a post with some Lorem ipsum text so we all could see, how it would turn out and … woa, immediately an email was sent to all subscribers of our website. It’s just that in this situation I didn’t think about the newsletter-subscribers. Again, a sandbox would have helped.

      • Ian Dunn 6:08 pm on March 9, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Hi Bego, you may find the Meta Environment to be an easier way to get a local WordCamp.org sandbox. It automatically provisions a local version of the site with all of the open source code and some sample content.

        You could then either re-use one of the existing sites in the Meta Environment, or create a new one. If you opt to create a new one, instead of creating it directly from wp-admin > Network > Sites, just create a new WordCamp post on the Central site, and then check the ‘create site’ box. That will make sure the site gets setup the same way it is in production.

        You could use the Core import/export tools to initially sync content between production and your sandbox, but they probably wouldn’t work very well for future syncs (e.g., creating duplicate pages). Do you have any ideas about a better way to sync between production and a sandbox?

        • Bego Mario Garde 9:41 am on March 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Oh Ian, this was a very, very helpful hint. I wish I had known that before. But to support others couldn’t we add a link to this Meta Environment-Github repository at http://plan.wordcamp.org/first-steps/web-presence/using-the-wordcamp-theme/ ?

          By the way, the guide through the first steps, which I mentioned above, recommends to copy the compressed custom style sheet from another WordCamp and run it through a deminifyer. Although this certainly works, you end with a cluttered style sheet that lacks any kind of comments or structure. Also it may take a while to clear out dozens of `!important` style sheet rules that probably have been added last minute during an event. As much as I understand people use !important if they are in a hurry and you probably want to change appearance of a site while the WordCamp is already running, I at least wanted to start with a clean style sheet. It would save much time and efforts to have a bunch of default CSS to start with (one for each theme?).

          • Ian Dunn 4:55 pm on March 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            That’s a good suggestion, I’ve added info on setting up a local sandbox to that page :)

            As far as importing other styles goes, I agree that we can do better. In fact, there’s a discussion about that very topic going on right now, and we already have a prototype for a tool that lets organizers easily clone another WordCamp’s CSS and related elements. It still needs some work though, so we’d love to get more people contributing to it :)

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