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  • Courtney Engle Robertson 7:27 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags: ,   

    Recap of August 25, 2015 

    Slack Log  (Requires Slack login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
    3. Slides discussion led by @courtneydawn
      • See and comment on the Slides post for progress
      • Pros and cons of several formats were considered.
    4. Use of tags and categories on the P2 are being implemented further. New tags will be assigned during team meetings.
    5. Lesson plans status and questions
      • Spreadsheet regarding claimed and abandoned lessons is current
    6. Testing status and questions
    7. WordCamp Contributor Day Onboarding
      • Team thoughts on Get Started and blue box on Training page continued from last week
      • Consideration to reword the introductory paragraph on the blue box to present the big picture of the Training team.
      • Tasks for contributors were reviewed
      • Scheduled posts on the P2 to help orient new contributors will be considered. See East Bay Meetup post.
    8. Questions

     

     
  • Courtney O'Callaghan 4:53 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Slides 

    WORK SO FAR

    • Perfect Plugin (so far)
      • accessibility
      • backwards compatibility
      • reuse
      • minimal learning curve
      • ability to use without internet
      • design consistency between different sets of slides
      • maintainability
      • ease of updates
      • ability to account for different aspect ratio displays
    • Slides formats we have tried
      • Google slides
      • Reveal

    TO DO (add to comment section)

    • Plugin wish list
      • Explain items already in list
      • Add other dream feature requests
    • Explain Issues with external formats
      • Google slides
      • Reveal
    • Other formats (or plugins) we should try before WCUSA
      • PDF – need lp to try
     
    • Courtney Engle Robertson 5:09 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It would be great if the slides could be downloaded locally for instances without internet connection. Possible formats could also include jpg and pdf, as those will open in most browsers.

      Pro of Google Slides: can make a template that is submitted to their repository for others to use. Also, Google Slides are easily viewed online and offline, as well as exporting to image formats and pdf.

      Con of Google slides: Needing to understand Slide templates if layout adjustments need to be made. Content cannot be auto-updated from Training Lesson Plan pages. Aspect ratios of 4:3 and 16:9 would require 2 different files.

  • bethsoderberg 4:30 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink |  

    Tasks for Team Training Contributors 

    The training team has recently discussed a number of ways that contributor day volunteers can contribute to team training and in the process has started to review the content on the Getting Started page and in the blue box on the make.wordpress.org/training site. This has led to a general discussion with the aim of defining a list of tasks that volunteers can complete to contribute to the training team.

    Initial ideas brainstormed at the August 18, 2015 meeting include:

    • create lesson plans
    • test lesson plans
    • audit content for accuracy with the current version of WordPress
    • proofreading
    • stringing plans together for workshops
    • fixing screenshots
    • slide related tasks (eventually)
    • adding time estimates to lessons

    Please list any other ideas you have of ways folks could contribute to team training in the comments!

     
  • Courtney Engle Robertson 5:30 pm on August 24, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags: contributor days,   

    Agenda for August 25, 2015 

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
    3. Slides discussion led by @courtneydawn
      • We have agreed since the beginning of training that slides make sense as part of the lesson plan package.
      • We need slides to illustrate points.
      • We do not want to have to make slides and then update both slides and lesson plans each time.
      • We want slides to have these features:
        • accessibility
        • backwards compatibility
        • reuse
        • minimal learning curve
        • ability to use without internet
        • design consistency between different sets of slides
        • maintainability
        • ease of updates
        • ability to account for different aspect ratio displays
    4. Lesson plans status and questions
    5. Testing status and questions
    6. WordCamp Contributor Day Onboarding
    7. Questions

    Please add any additional agenda items in the comments!

     
  • Courtney O'Callaghan 10:04 pm on August 23, 2015 Permalink |  

    East Bay WordPress Meetup August 23, 2015 

    Welcome to the East Bay WordPress Meetup in Oakland, CA. Thank you for looking over the training lesson plans we have created and need help creating. Please post your questions, comments, and observations in the comments.

     
    • elurie 10:28 pm on August 23, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      hi courtney,
      I reviewed the How to Install WordPress on a Server Training Handbook. Here are my comments:
      This tutorial is great. It covers how to get ftp access and the troubleshooting part is helpful. The instructions include important explanations along with the step by step, and quiz.
      suggestion:
      an overviiew list of tasks before the detailed step by step

      Might benefit by a list
      of links to other codex WP install instructions
      https://codex.wordpress.org/New_To_WordPress_-_Where_to_Start
      https://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Installation_Techniques
      https://codex.wordpress.org/Installing_WordPress#Famous_5-Minute_Install
      https://codex.wordpress.org/Installing_WordPress
      https://codex.wordpress.org/Installing_WordPress_Locally_on_Your_Mac_With_MAMP

    • ellentobe 10:39 pm on August 23, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Intro to CSS training handbook

      https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/theme-school/intro-to-css/

      This is a great lesson! You’ve taken a complex topic, which I’m still learning, and made it fairly clear. I’ve got a few suggestions, mainly copyediting notes, but a few conceptual suggestions too.

      I think it’s really important to discuss the difference between “Edit CSS” and “Editor” when introducing Jetpack. I also think it’s important to give an intro to Jetpack – what it is, what it’s for, what we’ll be focussing on here, i.e. Edit CSS.

      I’ll use square brackets to give an indication of whether my suggestions are for copyediting, concept, etc. Please note in the copyedited suggestions it’s because there were missing letters or punctuation, mainly. Please let me know if you have any questions!

      regards
      Ellen Tobe
      emac@4wdesign.com
      ================
      [COPYEDITING NOTES]
      Prerequisite Skills #

      Students taking this module will want to have some basic familiarity with the following:

      • Installing and activating WordPress themes
      • Installing and activating WordPress plugins
      • Basic understanding of HTML
      ================
      Teacher Notes #
      Set-up: #

      • Performing a live demo while teaching the steps to modify the theme CSS is crucial to having the “hands on” understanding of the material.

      CONTENT NOTE CONCERNING INTRODUCING JETPACK:
      Teacher should be prepared to explain what Jetpack is.
      ================
      Hands-on Walkthrough #
      What is CSS? What does it do? #

      Welcome to Intro to CSS! Today you are going to learn how to alter the “look and feel” of your WordPress theme by modifying its existing Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) file, as well as write a few new styles of your own.

      In practical terms, the code found within your theme’s CSS file determines the appearance of your site by applying style rules to HTML content, which has no style of its own.

      One way to visualize this is to think of your site as an HTML “mannequin” and CSS as the “clothing” you put on it. Just like a mannequin’s clothing, you can change the CSS of your site any time you like, without altering its underlying HTML structure.

      For example, with just a few lines of CSS (and a few image files) we are able to turn our site into this:
      ================
      Learning the Lingo: Selectors, Properties, and Values #

      [copyedit: remove ‘ in “it’s” -correction: “its”]

      Like any foreign language, CSS can be made easier to understand by breaking down each “sentence” into its individual components. Here is an example of a common CSS declaration, as well as a diagram of what each CSS component is made of:
      ================
      How to Edit Theme CSS the Right Way #
      [Recommendation: would be good to introduce idea of child theme, and state that it’s not needed in this case because Jetpack is being used. ]
      ================
      Finding Your Theme’s Styles #

      [copyedit notes]

      We are going to focus on modifying styles that are already there, rather than writing our own CSS from scratch. In order to change an existing style, you have to find it first. This can be done using the developer tools already built into your web browser. We will be using Google Chrome for this workshop, but most modern browsers offer similar tools.

      It’s important to note that when using the inspector, you can edit your theme’s CSS, but not the HTML. That is because the HTML you see in your inspector is dynamically generated by PHP, and is not something you can directly edit. That’s OK though, because you can do a lot with CSS to modify your site’s appearance, as you will see in the upcoming exercises.

      ================
      [copyedit: add periods at the end of each line for consistency and better presentation]

      In the panel below you will see a split view, with:

      • Site HTML on the left with the element you selected highlighted.
      • CSS rules on the right that apply to that selected element on the right.
      • Above is your website, where you can see your changes previewed live.

      ================
      Exercise 2 – Background Colors and Padding

      [copyediting]
      [6th paragraph down]
      Doing this keeps our custom CSS from getting too bloated. Since the other styles for this element are already in the theme’s CSS, we only need to add our custom declaration.
      ================
      [conceptual issue involving Jetpack and editing CSS]

      It’s important to emphasis difference between Appearance > Edit CSS and Appearance > Editor. This is always confusing when using Jetpack and can create confusion. In fact, I wish the Jetpack folks would put a note with “Edit CSS” making it something like “Edit CSS using Jetpack.”

      “As with last time, be sure to copy the CSS from the inspector to your computer’s clipboard, then navigate to Appearance > Edit CSS and paste in your CSS. It should look something like this.”
      ================
      In the section about adding a logo to the header, with the line
      .site-header h1 a, .site-header h2…

      I think it would be good to explain why both h1 and h2 are included.
      ================
      Quix
      [copyedit notes]
      Use . at the end of each numbered line.

    • Tumikia 12:13 am on August 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi Courtney,

      I reviewed the ‘Intro to CSS’ training from the Theme-school Handbook Training along with Ellen and Nancy.
      https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/theme-school/intro-to-css/

      It is a very good training. Here are my notes:

      Assets #
      Please add these two tools.
      Browser Inspect Element tool
      http://www.w3schools.com/css/ is a valuable tool for students and instructors. Students can learn what value a property will take. It also provides information as to whether that value is supported in all browsers.

      ============

      Learning the Lingo: Selectors, Properties, and Values #
      Selector Can we be more precise and say “The HTML element that you want to change” rather than “the thing you want to change?”

      ============

      How to Edit Theme CSS the Right Way #
      “It is technically possible to locate and edit the existing CSS file that is hosted on your server, but this is a bad idea.” Please add: “That is, unless you’ve created a ‘child theme’. Learn more about child themes…” So they know there are exceptions to the rule. Sooner or later they will be introduced to child themes.
      “We will be using a plugin called “Jetpack” to accomplish this task.” Please link to the JetPack plugin (https://wordpress.org/plugins/jetpack/) or at least expound on the tool a bit more. I think instructors will be expected to explain what JetPack is because it isn’t just a CSS tool even though for the purpose of this lesson you are emphasizing this aspect of the plugin. Have Instructor/students confirm JetPack CSS is configured by selecting the Appearance tab in the Dashboard and find Edit CSS.

      ============

      Finding Your Theme’s Styles #
      We are going to focus on modifying styles that are already there, (exist),
      We will be using For this lesson we are using Google Chrome [Add: and the Inspect Element tool] for this workshop.

      “It’s important to note that when using the inspector, you can [Add: preview/] edit the CSS of your theme, but not the HTML.” The inspect element tool allows one to make temporary changes to styles, basically, you get to test them out.

      ============

      Exercises #
      How to use Materials? Where do you explain to instructors how to download and use the materials used in this exercise? Or how to set up their environment with these your exercise materials?

      ============

      Exercise 1 – Modifying Fonts
      “If you were careful in where you placed your cursor, you should see the HTML starting with Edit CSS and paste in your first lines of custom CSS. When you are done, save your changes, and visit the home page of your site, where you can see your custom styles have been applied.”

      I think you should tell them to edit what they copied. For example, text-decoration: none; already exists in their theme’s CSS. They should delete that first rule. Also, it’s good time to remind students that if Edit CSS is missing from the Appearance tab they should now activate JetPack and Configure CSS.

    • Nancy S Brink 1:37 am on August 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Greetings Courtney;
      I was one of three people looking over the Intro to CSS training. We might have some overlap in our comments as we were talking with each other about our observations.

      First, great module; I think it would give someone a good intro to what CSS is and what’s possible with it. Our critiques have to do mostly with clarifications of things “newbies” or an instructor not confident in CSS or WordPress might not understand. I’ve tried to indicate where in the doc my comments fall. Feel free to get in touch with me if it’s no clear.

      1) Explanation of or link to documentation on Jetpack. While they won’t have to activate it for the tutorial, we thought it would be important to understand the scope of Jetpack, and that it’s the specific module “Edit CSS” that needs to be activated, but not modules you don’t want to use. Edit CSS is mentioned in Exercise 1, but there’s no earlier referent. Clarification – Jetpack’s Edit CSS module , or some such — would be helpful.

      2) Typos in Teacher Notes:
      Pre-requisites: last line: “but has reached”, instead of but have reached
      Set up: should it be Jetpack is “installed” automatically in Development Mode? Felt somewhat awkward

      3) Learning the lingo: good diagram of the parts of the declaration, but should also point out the important curly braces, colon, and semi-colon (how many times have I suffered through finding that missing detail!) As the lesson instructs people to copy and paste from the inspector, and students won’t be typing in the declarations, I think it would help to point those out.

      • A thought — terms like permalink, for example: it slides into the exercises, but isn’t defined. Watch using WordPress specific terms that might not be familiar, without either a quick explanation or a link to more information. Would it make sense to have a link to a glossary in this section?

      4) What is CSS
      • It might be good to note that CSS can be contained in tags, at the head of a page, or in a linked style sheet, and that the CSS for your theme lives in the style sheet or style.css — that it’s a separate file from the php that generates the html (which is mentioned in the lesson.
      • You use the term “style rules later in the lesson; you might want a concise explanation of style rule and declaration here.
      • It might be good to have a sentence that notes that CSS is an evolving language, and a link to some sort of css reference guide, a css selector and value list, something of that sort, for those whose curiosity has been piqued. This would also help students to figure out what kinds of values a selector will accept, ie none vs 0, if their playing around with CSS.

      5) How to Edit your theme the right way
      • Make mention of child themes as a more advanced concept; and note difference between Edit CSS, which adds the styles to your theme, and Editor, which shows up right by Edit CSS and could be used accidentally (with consequences.)
      • Edit CSS is used here without reference to Jetpack; confusing

      6) Finding your theme’s style
      • It might be good to be more specific about introducing Inspect Element tool here, when you say “using the inspector.” Perhaps also another line or two explaining how the inspector works; later, it’s noted that these are not permanent fixes, but a way to try things out,to preview the changes wiithout committing in your theme, but it might be good to do that up front.

      7) Exercise 1
      • in copying and pasting the code from the inspector, might want to be clear that you want to copy and paste the changes or the new declarations, and not copy a duplicate of the already embedded css

      8) Exercise 2
      • type after rule for article.sticky .featured post {…
      — add s to keeps: Doing this keeps…

      I think the ID vs Class explanation could be clearer; again, a link to a CSS reference that includes definitions might be helpful, as this is an important but sometimes confusing concept.

      9) Exercise 3: adding the image
      • possible typo, in sentence right before closeup of url: “your tests site will use”. Should this be test, singular.
      • missing word?: After the instruction to add no-repeat: add the word “being”; it forces the image to be displayed once instead of being repeated.

      Thanks for this great opportunity; I really enjoyed going through the tutorial and would very much like to do others. I’d also appreciate feedback about the best way to give effective feedback to the tutorial writers. I’ve done a lot of training and writing of training materials (mostly youth-oriented) and know what a hard work it is.

      Thanks,
      Nancy

  • Courtney Engle Robertson 6:02 pm on August 18, 2015 Permalink |
    Tags:   

    Recap of August 18, 2015 Meeting 

    Slack Log  (Requires Slack login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
    3. Lesson plans status and questions
    4. Status of abandoned plans
      • We are doing a full audit to determine an accurate list of plans people are currently working on. If the plan you are listed with is correct, please ping @abuango or @bethsoderberg to let them know. If you can no longer work on the plan listed, please ping and let us know.
      • User Lessons:
      • Theme Lessons:
    5. Testing status and questions
      • Lesson plans need to include approximate time to conduct
    6. Continue review of Getting Started page and Welcome to the WordPress training team box
      • After review, the Getting Started page is primarily organized for lesson plan writers.  The team needs have expanding beyond this and a review of different ways in which people can contribute is underway.    Ideas suggested:
        • Write lesson plans
        • Test lesson plans
        • Review content to keep up with WordPress updates
        • Update screenshots
        • Copyediting
    7. Lesson plan continuity with WordPress updates
    8. Questions
     
  • bethsoderberg 11:59 am on August 18, 2015 Permalink |  

    Ensuring Accurate Lesson Plans 

    The training team has recently initiated a conversation about how we will ensure that the lesson plans that our team produces will continue to be up to date when WordPress itself is updated.

    Questions we have asked so far include:

    • When do we start tracking our plans to make sure they are up to date?
    • Do we start tracking after the plans have been copy edited and ready to test?
    • Do we only pay attention to completed approved plans?
    • How should we track the changes to WP and which plans they may impact?
    • How and who will do the updating of content?

    In the fall of 2014 we explored an idea in our meetings and at WordCamp San Francisco about adapting the Content Audit plugin or something similar for use in tracking changes from the dashboard of make.wordpress.org/training. This was an idea that was thoroughly researched and documented by @juliekuehl in this post: https://make.wordpress.org/training/2014/11/08/request-for-the-content-audit-plugin/. Moving forward, we should continue this conversation as part of the larger conversation about how to ensure accurate lesson plans.

    The conversation has boiled down to two fundamental issues that we need to address, which are:

    • What process will we use to make sure plans are up to date?
    • When is a plan considered “complete enough” to start tracking to ensure it is accurate?

    This post will be the place where we keep a running documentation of our conversation around this issue. Please leave your thoughts in the comments!

     
    • bethsoderberg 12:05 pm on August 18, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Initial thoughts on this subject from the August 4, 2015 meeting include:

      • If we have a lesson plan that hasn’t been tested yet and it ends up 2 versions behind what is current in WP – that’d be bad for the person testing the plan and for the students . – @courane01
      • P2 would be a good place for this discussion, rather than Slack. – @juliekuehl
      • Maybe anyone who is in the list of current LP authors gets a ping about upcoming changes when they come out, but then anything that has already been approved to test is handled differently. – @bethsoderberg
      • Sorting out what needs to be updated could be good tasks for contributor day people. For the actual updating of content maybe we could ping original author, and if they are not available submit on for others to just tweak. – @courane01
      • I have no idea how reliable pinging the original author would be, perhaps we could ping them if we know they are active (AKA have shown up to meetings lately) but otherwise open up for others? – @bethsoderberg
      • Some minor updates aren’t super urgent for lesson plan updates, but some create a very different experience if the lesson plan being tested doesn’t match up with what they student and instructor have installed. – @courane01
    • Mike Mueller 5:37 pm on August 18, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I especially like this: “Sorting out what needs to be updated could be good tasks for contributor day people. ” I think that’s a great thing based on my experience at WCSF.

    • Courtney Engle Robertson 5:38 pm on August 18, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If in addition to reviewing if content is current, people could review the style guide and copyedit.

  • bethsoderberg 11:15 pm on August 17, 2015 Permalink |  

    Agenda for August 18, 2015 Meeting 

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
    3. Lesson plans status and questions
    4. Status of abandoned plans
    5. Testing status and questions
    6. Continue review of Getting Started page and Welcome to the WordPress training team box
    7. Lesson plan continuity with WordPress updates
    8. Questions

    Please add any additional agenda items in the comments!

     
  • bethsoderberg 1:52 am on August 12, 2015 Permalink |  

    Recap of August 11, 2015 Meeting 

    Slack Log  (Requires Slack login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

      1. Greetings
      2. Recap of last meeting
      3. Slides
        1. Recap of July 31 Slides meeting
          • We have agreed since the beginning of training that slides make sense as part of the lesson plan package.
          • We need slides to illustrate points.
          • We do not want to have to make slides and then update both slides and lesson plans each time.
          • We want slides to have these features:
            • accessibility
            • backwards compatibility
            • reuse
            • minimal learning curve
            • ability to use without internet
            • design consistency between different sets of slides
            • maintainability
            • ease of updates
            • ability to account for different aspect ratio displays
        2. We will continue to discuss slides every other week, with @courtneydawn guiding the discussion.
        3. @courtneydawn will write up questions based on the 7/31 meeting for everyone to think about and will post these questions in the P2. The team will comment and collaborate there until we reconvene on the slides topic during our regular meetings.
      4. No updates on lesson plans
      5. Testing
        1. @melindahelt‘s meetup group is meeting next week to decide what they’d like to learn about, she will compare their list to our list to see if there is another opportunity to test something with her group.
      6.  Status of abandoned plans
        1. We are doing a full audit to determine an accurate list of plans people are currently working on. If the plan you are listed with is correct, please ping @abuango or @bethsoderberg to let them know. If you can no longer work on the plan listed, please ping and let us know.
          • User Lessons:
          • Theme Lessons:
          • Speaker Lessons – all of these @jillbinder
            • Creating Great Slides
            • Imposter Syndrome
            • Finding a Topic for a WordPress Talk
            • Writing the Pitch for your WordPress Talk
            • Creating your WordPress Talk
            • Becoming a Better Speaker
            • Women Talking WordPress
      7. The team discussed initial thoughts on content changes/additions to the Getting Started page and the blue box on Training homepage.
        1. We all agree that listing out ways people can contribute immediately would be helpful. Ideas include:
          • Copyediting
          • Content review to make sure plans are technically in line with the current version of WordPress
          • Writing lesson plans
        2. We all agreed that we should remove the design bullet point from the “ways to contribute” list since that hasn’t really applied to what we’ve actually produced as a team.

     

     
  • Courtney Engle Robertson 12:57 am on August 11, 2015 Permalink |  

    Agenda for August 11, 2015 

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
    3. Slides discussion led by @courtneydawn
    4. Lesson plans status and questions
    5. Testing status and questions
    6. Status of abandoned plans
    7. WordCamp Contributor Day Onboarding
    8. Questions

    Please add any additional agenda items in the comments!

     
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