Design updates: week five

This is the weekly call for updates for those contributing to design, as outlined here.

The idea of these it to keep all designers connected. If you are contributing to design please add your reply as a comment to this post by Thursday 23:00 UTC. All comments will be combined into a weekly update post on Friday for the design team.

Not a designer but you have something you’d like us to work on? No problem, you can also leave a comment. Just tell us what it is, if a specific team or skill also tell us that.

Just reply to the following:

  • What did you work on this past week? Anything completed (don’t forget a link to show us the amazing work!)?
  • What are you currently focusing on?
  • Anything you need help with? Got a tricky project? Are you looking for a task? Perhaps you know about a task that needs a designer or need a buddy to work on something (lets support each other)?
  • Any links for inspiration you want to share (doesn’t have to be WordPress design links)?

Everyone is welcome to comment, adding names of all that commented last week and were at summit – your name will be added to list as you give an update (so we can include everyone).

cc: @melchoyce, @michael-arestad, @folletto, @mapk, @sonjaleix, @saracannon, @liljimmi, @joen, @empireoflight, @joshuawold, @celloexpressions, @zetaraffix, @boemedia, @annaharrison

Why WordPress? 2

When the new year began, and shortly after my first Contribution Day for design at WordCamp US, I wrote a short essay entitled, “Why WordPress?”

Now after experiencing my first WordCamp Europe and the Contribution Day there for designers, I started thinking more about how WordPress lies at the foundations of a freer world, and I wrote a V2 on the airplane ride back to the States while freehand scribbling on my iPad, too.

As a newbie to “speaking WordPress” let me know how you think this resonates, or not, with how you think of WordPress and design. Thank you! —JM


WordPress prides itself on being a community-made system that competes with the giants. WordPress believes that helping each other succeed lies at the foundations of the Internet. A powerful technology that exists to empower your freedom might seem unlikely these days, but that’s how WordPress got started.

Starting in 2003, a simple solution to make building a website easier evolved into the most common and beloved technology today: WordPress. WordPress is an example of how a focus on simplicity set the course for over a quarter of sites that we know as the World Wide Web today.

The breakthrough moment was when the inventors gave away all of WordPress’ underlying code to the rest of the world for free. By freely sharing WordPress, they soon discovered programmers, editors, designers, marketers, and whole businesses from everywhere ready to join in and make it grow.

With each new community-made revision of WordPress came new possibilities for more people to get on the Web — from the travel blogger all the way to the mega-publisher. As a result, WordPress has become the best long-term investment for your time because of its loyal following and its community’s shared determination.

But times have changed and the biggest tech companies of the world, and also new upstarts, have been looking to control your participation on the Internet. Over time, they have built sophisticated mousetraps to capture you in their comfortable microworlds, and ultimately limit what you can do within their controlled confines.

The complete freedom of WordPress has come with the responsibility to know the underlying code “under the hood” of your site. So today, the WordPress community is hard at work designing coding-free approaches to getting your website going that do not sacrifice any of the power and flexibility of the WordPress ethos.

There will never be any limitations to what you can build with WordPress — the community fights for your freedom. WordPress is betting firmly on a some “assembly required” approach, so that you will always have the flexibility to go beyond what you’ve created. That way, not only does WordPress remain affordable, it remains your powerful Do-It-Yourself tool for the Internet.

What you make in WordPress is yours.

A Better “Page on Front” Experience: Previous Ideas

A problem that’s plagued WordPress for years is the confusion and ambiguity around setting your “front page.” The addition of making new pages in #38164 was a big jump forward, but there’s still work we can do to make this a better experience for people setting up their sites.

Here’s what it looks like now:

Customizer

wp-admin

Let’s try to tackle this issue again in 4.9 and see if we can at least make some incremental improvements.

To start us off, let’s use this post to take a look at some of the ideas proposed in the original ticket and chat them:

Continue reading

#page-on-front

X-post: Page on front settings

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/test: Comment on Page on front settings

Design updates: week four

This is the weekly call for updates for those contributing to design, as outlined here.

The idea of these it to keep all designers connected. If you are contributing to design please add your reply as a comment to this post by Thursday 23:00 UTC. All comments will be combined into a weekly update post on Friday for the design team.

Not a designer but you have something you’d like us to work on? No problem, you can also leave a comment. Just tell us what it is, if a specific team or skill also tell us that.

Just reply to the following:

  • What did you work on this past week? Anything completed (don’t forget a link to show us the amazing work!)?
  • What are you currently focusing on?
  • Anything you need help with? Got a tricky project? Are you looking for a task? Perhaps you know about a task that needs a designer or need a buddy to work on something (lets support each other)?
  • Any links for inspiration you want to share (doesn’t have to be WordPress design links)?

Everyone is welcome to comment, adding names of all that commented last week and were at summit – your name will be added to list as you give an update (so we can include everyone).

cc: @melchoyce, @michael-arestad, @folletto, @mapk, @sonjaleix, @saracannon, @liljimmi, @joen, @empireoflight, @joshuawold, @celloexpressions, @zetaraffix, @boemedia

#weeky-updates

Bringing back office hours

Iterating on how meetings works is a great way to approach things. Weekly updates have been happening for three weeks and seem to be working. One thing this didn’t cover was a chance to focus on tickets, issues and work together. Lets try and fix that by bringing back a weekly office hours.

When? Thursday 13th July 16:00 UTC

What? The idea is you can bring any ticket you want discussed, any issue you need help with. You can also pop along if you are just looking to get involved with the design team more. Unlike a meeting, it’s a chance to work together on something or move each other along.

There will be no set agenda. We will give opportunity for topics as comments, or to bring them to the office hours. It’s a first come, first served basis in that sense. Sometimes we may just have a discussion around one, sometimes it may be more.

This week we already have one discussion point:

  • Customizer: Should we stop contextually hiding features? #40432

Got another? Bring it along to the office hours and lets discuss.

WordCamp Europe Contribution Day

This is an update on what the design team did at WordCamp Europe contribution day. This time we tried a few things, we did both group work and workshops. The idea in doing this was we gave people a range of options to help them contribute. A huge thanks to everyone that attended.

Gutenberg session

The first session of the day in the core room was about getting to know Gutenberg, we encouraged as many to go to that. It is important that designers get to also know and be involved.

Workshops

The first workshop was lead by @michaelarestad and myself. We began by adding our thoughts around functionality of WordPress. We added these post-it notes to a wall and then did some organising them. From that we moved into looking at the problem areas, what experience had a positive or negative impact – we used a happy/sad scale. We also looked at what the experience was like away from desktop. Here is a gallery containing photos from that workshop session:

After that session, @johnmaeda took us through some explorations. We got to know everyone who was there and also amongst other things explore what our fears were about WordPress. Here is a gallery of that workshop:

The groups

After lunch, we moved into group work. This was where we roughly split into the following groups:

  • Gutenberg: focusing on usability testing and getting everyone focused on finding the issues with Gutenberg and enabling others with the usability tests.
  • Customizer and UI/UX triage: we combined those areas and ended up focusing more on ticket triage.
  • Dashicons: this team sped through tickets and really got a lot done.

Design updates: week three

This is the weekly call for updates for those contributing to design, as outlined here.

The idea of these it to keep all designers connected. If you are contributing to design please add your reply as a comment to this post by Thursday 23:00 UTC. All comments will be combined into a weekly update post on Friday for the design team.

Not a designer but you have something you’d like us to work on? No problem, you can also leave a comment. Just tell us what it is, if a specific team or skill also tell us that.

Just reply to the following:

  • What did you work on this past week? Anything completed (don’t forget a link to show us the amazing work!)?
  • What are you currently focusing on?
  • Anything you need help with? Got a tricky project? Are you looking for a task? Perhaps you know about a task that needs a designer or need a buddy to work on something (lets support each other)?
  • Any links for inspiration you want to share (doesn’t have to be WordPress design links)?

Everyone is welcome to comment, adding names of all that commented last week and were at summit – your name will be added to list as you give an update (so we can include everyone).

cc: @melchoyce, @michael-arestad, @folletto, @mapk, @sonjaleix, @saracannon, @liljimmi, @joen, @empireoflight, @joshuawold, @celloexpressions

#weeky-updates

X-post: Call for testing: Gutenberg

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/test: Call for testing: Gutenberg

Design updates: week two

This is the second weekly call for updates for those contributing to design, as outlined here.

The idea of these it to keep all designers connected. If you are contributing to design please add your reply as a comment to this post by Thursday 23:00 UTC. All comments will be combined into a weekly update post on Friday for the design team.

Not a designer but you have something you’d like us to work on? No problem, you can also leave a comment. Just tell us what it is, if a specific team or skill also tell us that.

Just reply to the following:

  • What did you work on this past week? Anything completed (don’t forget a link to show us the amazing work!)?
  • What are you currently focusing on?
  • Anything you need help with? Got a tricky project? Are you looking for a task? Perhaps you know about a task that needs a designer or need a buddy to work on something (lets support each other)?
  • Any links for inspiration you want to share (doesn’t have to be WordPress design links)?

Everyone is welcome to comment, adding names of all that commented last week and were at summit – your name will be added to list as you give an update (so we can include everyone).

cc: @melchoyce, @michael-arestad, @folletto, @mapk, @sonjaleix, @saracannon, @liljimmi, @joen, @empireoflight, @joshuawold, @rileybrook, @celloexpressions, @joyously

#weeky-updates