Meet your new WPTV team reps!

Howdy all, voting is closed, and the results are in. Your new co-leads for the WordPress.tv community team for 2019 are Pascal Casier (@casiepa) and Michael Wiginton (@roseapplemedia) and congratulations to you both!

Screen Shot 2018-12-03 at 10.39.00 AM

Please be sure to attend our weekly meeting tomorrow at 17:00 UTC to wish them well, and thanks to everyone that participated!

WPTV team rep voting is open (again!)

Apologies for pulling down yesterdays poll, we discovered it was not locking out multiple votes so the results could not be trusted. Instead I have created the following Google Survey, so please vote at the below link.

As a reminder, the team rep role does not indicate a position of leadership. Team reps report to the broader WordPress community on the work that the team does. For this reason, while all votes will be counted from the community, votes from active members of the WordPress.tv team will be weighted more heavily when selecting representatives for the team.

Thanks again to @casiepa @prathameshp @roseapplemedia for your interest in representing WPTV, and good luck!

Vote here for your next team reps

Note: You will be required to log in to Google when voting (via your Gmail address) to prevent multiple votes, and voting closes December 1st

WPTV Team Rep voting is now open!

Thank you @casiepa @prathameshp @roseapplemedia for your interest in being team lead for 2019. Everyone seemed to like the idea of having co-reps to share responsibilities and support one another so with this in mind I’d like to open voting. Please make two (2) choices in the below poll. The two nominees with the most votes will co-rep the team going forward. Best of luck to you all!

Update: The poll did not lock out multiple votes, so I’ve taken it down for now and will post a new poll. sorry!

* Voting closes December 1st

Now Accepting Team Rep Nominations for the WPTV Team

As is common practice within the WordPress open source project, each community team has one or two representatives who has been nominated by their peers to serve as “team rep” and are responsible for communicating to the other community teams via weekly updates, as well as leading weekly team chats, wrangling new and current contributors, etc.

TL;DR: We are accepting nominations for a new Team Rep for the WordPress.tv mod team. If you would like to nominate someone (including yourself) to serve as WPTV team rep for 2019, please comment on this thread.

More after the jump…
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Benny, Elvin and Dexter Retiring

by Cemal Tashan

It is that time. We are saying “Goodbye” to Benny, Elvin, and Dexter. They are WordPress TV’s LiveStream kits that have helped many WordCamps to LiveStream their sessions to WordPressers all around the world.

They were in use for several years. The technology has advanced so fast, and the equipment that we used in these kits has become obsolete. With the streaming capabilities of venues where we hold WordCamps and possibility of even using cellphones for streaming caused the use of LS Kits to sharply decline.

Last year only two WordCamps used our LS Kits.Also, we have to pay large amounts to LS for the subscription for live streaming. So this was a mutual decision of the WordPress community.

Please join me saying “Goodbye” to these legends and make sure that you continue listening to their great music.

Community Conduct Project – Kick off meeting scheduled for 17:00 UTC on the 5th September 2017

Hi Everyone,

Thanks for everyone who replied to the proposal for the WordPress Community Conduct Project. We have recieved lots of great feedback and positivity towards the project both in person at WordCamp Europe and online.

We’re kicking off the project on the 5th September 2017 at Tuesday, August 15, 2017, 1:00 PM EDT on the WordPress Slack #community channel

Please see update post for more details..

We will spend some of the time during the meeting to discuss when the best time to meet will be for everyone who wants to participate in the project.

We look forward to seeing you all there!

#wordpress-tv

X-post: Replacing a lost European camera kit + a request for an additional one

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/community: Comment on Replacing a lost European camera kit + a request for an additional one

WordCamp Europe 2017: The recap

WordCamp Europe (next to WC US) is THE place to be for WordPress fans from all over the world. The yearly event this time happened in Paris on June 15 to 17. It started with a Contributor Day, followed by two days full of great talks.

About 500 people attended Contributor Day and one of the tables was reserved for WordPress.tv. A team of 8 spent most of the day together: @dartiss @foliovision @sanelakurtek @lesleymolecke1 @mazzomaz @stk_jj @mgelves and myself (@casiepa). After a short introduction on where the WPTV team kicks in, some practical sessions and then also discussions were held.

A summary of the day:

  • Some received videos were reviewed, edited and prepared for upload (add intro, compress)
  • Existing tools for video editing were discussed: Handbrake, iMovie, Sony Vegas and FCPX
  • A discussion was tabled on the reach out for new WordCamps: Reach out to organizers before, explain what WPTV does and can do, make sure they link to the WPTV event from their website afterwards.
  • Another great discussion was held on how to recover ‘orphan’ WordCamps, e.g. existing in YouTube but not in WordPress.tv or where no videos were found at all. The team started with Nashik WordCamp and during Contributor Day, the first videos were already uploaded.
  • Some extra thoughts that came up and should be elaborated:
    • Add video links in the handbook to have more visual. For some written texts in the handbook, some videos already exist, so make sure to link them.
    • Get camera kits in Asia and India. To be discussed further if this is feasible.
    • Find a way to add ‘Click here to help WordPress.tv’ below any video. How to improve the way of getting videos and contributors? Both on WordPress.tv as on YouTube.

Mauricio and myself had a great time talking with the rest of the table and are already checking where to stay in Belgrade for the next WordCamp Europe in June 2018!

 

Proposal: WordPress Community Conduct Project

In 2012 a Code of Conduct was introduced for official WordPress events to make WordCamps safer and more inclusive. It is now applied to all WordCamps worldwide and anyone who attends a WordCamp automatically agrees to it.

Since the Code of Conduct was first introduced, the community has grown and diversified.

At the 2015 Community Summit, a group discussed expanding the scope of the WordCamp Code of Conduct to apply to the WordPress community as a whole. Work on such a Community Code of Conduct has been ongoing since early 2013, and a ticket was created in 2015, but no finalized version has ever been presented to the community and ratified.

The WordCamp Code of Conduct has been active for 5 years as a tool to promote the safety and inclusion of all community members at WordCamps world wide. The Community Conduct Project aims to expand the scope of the Code of Conduct to promote the same values of safety and inclusion in all official community spaces including WordCamps, WordPress Meetups, official fora and websites including comment sections, and official chat channels (specifically Slack and IRC).

Proposal

Everything needs a starting point, so this began as a proposal by Jenny Wong and Morten Rand-Hendriksen, and reviewed by various community members.

We would like to now take this opportunity to share this project proposal with you all, the amazing WordPress community.

We propose a new Community Conduct Project to update the WordCamp Code of Conduct and expand its scope to become a WordPress Community Code of Conduct (CCoC).

The Project has two main goals:

a) Create a CCoC, to be posted on WordPress.org, promoting safety and inclusion for all community members in community spaces,

and

b) create a system for reporting, handling, and resolution of CCoC-related issues as they arise.

To meet these goals, several questions need to be answered including:

Who can be called a “WordPress Community Member”?
In what spaces does the CCoC apply?
Under what circumstances can a person be considered to be acting as a community member?
What values and ideals would a CCOC protect?
Based on these values and ideals, what is the baseline assumption a person can expect whilst being in a WP space.
What spaces, physical or virtual, are considered “community spaces” in which all members can be expected to promote and/or adhere to these values and ideals and any agreed upon community guidelines derived from them?
The answers to these questions will help inform the process of drafting a new CCoC, a system for reporting, handling, and resolving issues, which will become the enforcement procedures based on WordPress community values.

The work will be done in three phases:

Phase 1: Community review and input on the existing Code of Conduct including a survey for the community to participate in.
Phase 2: Review and categorize feedback.
Phase 3: Draft a revised Code of Conduct based on feedback from Phases 1 and 2.
The first task of the project will be to gather data about the current Code of Conduct. As a starting point, we have prepared a draft for a survey to be discussed by the group at the first meeting. This survey will be published publicly to learn more about how the current CoC is used in the real world.

Join In

Any and all community members are encouraged to provide input and/or join the project, no previous skills or experience required. In particular, we are seeking diverse voices so if you identify as a member of a diverse, underrepresented, or marginalized group you are encouraged to join.

All meetings will be conducted in the #community-team Slack channel, and minutes published on the Make Community blog to ensure full transparency using the tag CCOC. Working documents will be available for review by the community throughout the project and these will be linked at the end of each post.

If you or someone you know are interested in contributing to this project, please leave a comment below providing a rough ideal time in UTC format, which timezone you are based in and join the #community-team channel. Before scheduling a regular meeting time, we will review the ideal times and timezones of interested community members, to ensure everyone can take part.

Thanks for reading <3

#wordpress-tv

Community Interview Series

I wanted to let the team know how everything is going with the WordPress Community Interview Series since we are starting a new year.

There have been 35 interviews published since the first 2 on June 16th, 2016. The first few weeks, I was trying to publish 2 interviews per week but it was recommended that I cut back to 1 per week. I quickly agreed because it was very evident that it was going to be difficult to keep that schedule up.

I have been able to have 2 or 3 interviews scheduled in advance and at least 1 video interview in reserve in case anything unexpected happens. For the most part the selection for people to be interviewed has been random. I take a look at recent WordCamps, speakers or organizers, Twitter comments, etc. It has worked fairly well.

One thing that I want to mention, 2 of the published videos were actually a compilation of short Skype calls that I did during Global WordPress Translation Day 2 on November 12th.

Of the 35 interviews, 18 are non US. The map below shows the locations.

https://cldup.com/GW0S2VjdKy.png

As far as my setup, it is very simple and easy to use. I use a MacBook Air with either a Audio Technica AR 2100 or a Blue Snowball. Also, I use earbuds to reduce speaker noise back into the mic. I use the Ecamm application with Skype to record the calls.

For processing the videos I use Screenflow. This app is not very expensive and fairly easy to use. I had a voiceover done using Fiverr which has worked out great. I can insert text, lower thirds, effects, etc.

The Skype calls ‘usually’ last about 15 minutes or so. We talk for a few minutes before I do an introduction just so I get over some nervousness. I am trying to concentrate on cutting out the ummms and ahhhs. The average length is about 10 minutes, although a few have gone almost 20 minutes.

I try to follow a loose format of an introduction, talk about WordCamps, the WordPress Community, anything special the guest might be involved in and then wrap up. This has worked well so far.

That is pretty much it. If anybody has suggestions, please feel free to comment!