What’s new on LearnWP – August 2022

During August 2022, the Training team published the following resources on Learn.WordPress.org

Lesson Plans

Lesson plans are ideal for MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers or presenters and other trainers to use when facilitating a presentation.

Tutorials

These short, free videos are ideal for on-demand direct learners.

Online Workshops

The WordPress Online Workshop Meetup focuses on helping users at all levels learn more about using the software and to help others use it too. It is part of the resources available through Learn WordPress. You can sign-up for events for free.

Events list


Contribute

These resources are available to use and promote. If you would like to take part in the sprints for Learn WordPress, join the Training Team meetings. The July 2022 Sprint post.

#training

Site Editor: a More User-Friendly Name

In July 2022, the WordPress community participated in a lively discussion around a more user-friendly name to give the suite of features and tools known as Full Site Editor. With community feedback in mind, it will simply be referred to as the “Site Editor,” going forward. Thank you to everyone who voiced their points of view on a topic that touches every part of the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project.

Landing on Site Editor was the result of two key considerations. Firstly, Site Editor offers a clear and simple description to users with a range of technical skills. Secondly, there was substantial support for Site Editor, particularly from the Polyglot community, as the term that translates most effectively into hundreds of different languages. As we heard at WordCamp US 2022, better multilingual support is an important future direction for WordPress, so choosing easily translated terms is an important step. 

Site Editor also keeps the spirit of its original FSE codename as the powerful, full collection of features it encompasses. As a bonus, it also doesn’t cost us anything from an SEO or marketing standpoint, since it’s a simplification of the existing term. 🙂 

You’ll still see or hear instances of FSE around. There is no need to erase it from our story. Going forward, you’ll hear more people and WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ announcements refer to the Site Editor. You’re invited to begin using the term Site Editor immediately and update areas within the documentation to reflect that change.

p.s. – Is this a rebranding? I wouldn’t say so, myself. FSE was an easy way to refer to a complex, new thing and didn’t make much sense as a branded term. This is just an update to the way we’re talking about that complex thing.

Props to the community members who posted here for voicing their thoughts on giving the Site Editor its new and user-friendly name and to @angelasjin @cbringmann and @jpantani for their editorial efforts!

Core Performance Team Update – January 26, 2023

Performance Lab

Performance Lab plugin updates are released monthly on the third Monday of the month.

January’s release 1.9.0 included enhancements to the SQLite module, including clarifying language around multi-server environments and also removing warnings about multi-server environments. Plus enhancements to object-cache.php drop-in interoperability with other plugins.

Proposals and Discussion

Performance Team chats are held weekly on Tuesdays; check https://make.wordpress.org/meetings/ for current time.

The team has been focusing on planning and prioritization for 2023. A roadmap is currently being worked on, with priorities being proposed and discussed in this GitHub issue.

A new module proposal was shared for SQLite persistent object cache to be discussed with the community and performance team.

Tickets

In addition to Performance Lab, the Performance Team also works on performance-related tickets in coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and holds a monthly Bug Bash on the first Wednesday of every month; check https://make.wordpress.org/meetings/ for current time.

The team continues to work on several priority tickets for 6.2, including:

With the 6.2 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. approaching on February 7, several members of the team are supporting the release squad in benchmarking performance of new pull requests, regularly checking in on tickets in the performance focus, and helping get them across the finish line before Beta.

WordCamp Europe 2020 Contributor Day Update

You have most likely heard that WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe 2020 has moved online, after the in-person event in Porto was postponed to 2021. Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. for WCEU will take place as planned, in just seven weeks time on 4 June. It will be the first time a WordPress contributor event on this scale will take place completely online.

WCEU Online team is working really hard to make plans, preparations, and getting all details ready. We will be sharing more on the details about the Contributor Day, the tools and platforms as details get worked out. We will keep you regularly updated.

Our goal to leave no contributor behind continues as the event for this year moves online. We want to help attendees become longer term contributors to the project and enthuse others to take part too. We know that it may be harder for new contributors to join in for the first time virtually.

To create a welcoming and positive experience, especially for new contributors, we are asking help from Make team reps and experienced contributors.

Onboarding before the contributor day

Because Contributor Day will be shorter than usual, our goal is to onboard the majority of new contributors before the actual event day. We will pay special attention to promoting the Contributor Day Orientation tool to help attendees choose the right Make team for them and on providing guides on setting up needed accounts and tools.

How each Make team can help:

  1. Update the “Getting Started at a Contributor Day” page in your handbook (example from Polyglots). This page should give a general idea of what and how the team works during Contributor Days. If you don’t have such a page, can you please create one.
  2. Schedule a special office hour in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. specifically targeted for new contributors. At this time, experienced contributors can be available to help newer members, for example, in setting up the tools. These office hours should take place between 25 May and 3 June 2020 in a time that is friendly for European timezones. When the time for office hours is chosen, please inform the WCEU Contributor Day team in the comments. We will gather the responses into one blog post.
  3. Choose an experienced contributor(s) from the team to record a short video introduction about your team. These videos will replace the traditional live introductions given during opening remarks and also used in the Contributor Day Orientation tool. Detailed guides for making these videos will be shared in the coming weeks.

Better support during the day

It can be harder to know if a contributor is stuck or needs more support during an online event. We want to try and avoid new, enthusiastic contributors leaving during the event. We want to work with you to help make the experience more positive and fun.

How each Make team can do to help us avoid prevent this:

  1. Divide the tasks planned for the day between ‘good first tasks’ and ‘tasks for experienced contributors’. Make sure that every new contributor gets an easy task first. An example of how the Community Team does this: Call for ideas and plans for the day.
  2. Choose at least two experienced contributors to facilitate the work during the day, to help new contributors and to answer their questions quickly and happily.
  3. Could you plan an introductory session to help onboard new contributors to your team? The team-specific introductory sessions will take place after opening remarks.

Tasks for Team Reps

We are also asking Team Reps for your suggestions on how the day should be organized, and what tools and platforms we will need. We know we’re asking quite a lot in a short timescale. We really want to work with the Make WordPress teams to create a successful Contributor Day. It is the first time we have attempted an event on this scale online, and we know working together we can produce something awesome.

All the tasks for the Team Reps

  1. Update the ‘Getting Started at a Contributor Day’ page in your handbook or create it.
  2. Schedule European timezones friendly office hours taking place in Slack between 25 May and 3 June, targeted to answer questions from new contributors and help them to set up tools.
  3. Choose contributor(s) from your team to help and start thinking about the content of your team video introduction. We will share the details about this in the coming weeks.
  4. Plan your team tasks for the day in advance and keep a separate list of good first tasks.
  5. Look for experienced contributors that will facilitate and help other contributors during the day.
  6. Talk with the team about the need for an introductory session to help onboard new contributors and decide if it’s something your team will do.
  7. Make a rough estimate of how many working groups your team needs during the day. Working groups are contributors working together with specific tasks or features, who will need a dedicated virtual table/space for discussion. This information is crucial for WCEU in planning platform usage and layout.

The WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day organizing team will contact all reps in the following weeks to make sure that this information has reached every team. We will start collecting the information needed to finalize our plans starting at the end of April.

If you have any ideas about making the online Contributor Day a more valuable and comfortable experience for contributors or about the event in general, let us know in the comments or via email to contributing@wp-europe.org.

Thank you, let’s make history together with the very first fully online Contributor Day!

The WCEU 2020 Online Contributor Day Team
Abha, Laetitia, Marco, Michael, Pedro, Timi

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#wceu2022cd

Our Three Big Ideas for 2022!

2022 is going to be a big year for WordPress as we get more and more people to use the new editor (and as a result make the editor even better)! We’re also going to be gearing up for a our 20th anniversary next year 😮 —I can’t believe this project has been around for so long!

For easy tracking, here are the big focuses for this year:

  1. Drive adoption of the new WordPress editor (though education, awareness, and better content for new WordPressers).
  2. Support open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. alternatives for all site-building necessities (through supporting Openverse, our suite of directories, and the way we present ourselves to the world).
  3. Open Source stewardship (through maintenance of our community programs, leading by example, and other project as we find them).
  4. Bonus: Get ready for WP20!

Read more about these big ideas and more specific goals for each or, if you’re a team repTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts., send me your thoughts on how your teams can join the effort!

#goals #planning

Mobile Team Update – February 22nd

WordPress iOSiOS The operating system used on iPhones and iPads. and Android version 19.3 is available for testing. Sign up here to join the betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. program on iOS or follow this link on your Android device, tap on “Become a beta tester”.

Highlights for the last two weeks:

  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor: Fixed a custom color palette issue, and an issue with text highlighting.

#mobile

Care and influence: a theory about the WordPress community

Many people find that the structure of the WordPress community is ambiguous. While there are Team Handbooks that address contributors, the way different groups influence and support each other can be unclear. The duty of care is the responsibility of one group to avoid decisions that harm another group in an organization.

I learned about this interesting progression of care and influence recently from Josepha Haden, and wanted to share what I thought was a brilliant way to communicate this. She explained it to me and a group of other contributors, by showing us this flow. 

Like all great sticky notes, there is no clarity without explanation. I would like to shed some light on my understanding of how the WordPress community works, and see if these ideas resonate for other people, the way they did for me.

The five sticky notes above are the 5 groups of people within the WordPress ecosystem.

  • Visitors
  • Users
  • Extenders
  • Contributors
  • Leaders

Duty of Care

Examining the graphic below, the duty of care from the left extends to all groups to that particular group’s right. For example, an extender exhibits a duty of care toward both the users and the visitors while a user’s duty of care is primarily toward just their visitors.

Levels of Influence

Each group directly influences those adjacent to it via feedback loops and meeting their needs. Groups to the left influence groups to the right, while feedback from the right directs what is needed from groups to the left. 

For example, a WordPress user is affected by both visitors and extenders. Imagine a content creator that shares their passion for photography through a WordPress website. This photographer may have visitors that need to purchase photos. In response, the user now has a need to make it possible for visitors to purchase photos on a site. 

  1. The extenders build the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that supports the need.
  2. The user installs it on their site.
  3. The visitors can now purchase photos. 

The groups

Visitors

Visitors are the people that arrive at a WordPress site to gain information or engage in an activity. These people may not be aware of the groups, or even that they’re using WordPress, but they do care about their task at hand. Their needs can directly influence the user’s website.

Users

Users are people who use WordPress as their CMS. These range from website builders, to website designers, to small businesses, or content creators. They are affected by their visitors, and care about what happens when people visit their site. Users are also affected by the extenders, who build things that add new functionality to WordPress.

Extenders

Extenders include those who extend WordPress through the creation of themes, plugins, blocks, and more. They are also people who teach WordPress to others through WordPress podcasts, newsletters, and tutorials. The WordPress ecosystem is enriched by a large number of extenders. 

The extenders are affected by both the users and the contributors. Users determine the value of their plugins and themes. Contributors directly impact their work by creating/maintaining the CMS and providing ways to distribute quality extensions, like the plugin or theme repositories. Extenders also care not only for the users, but also about the users’ visitors. Extenders know their product’s success relies on both the WordPress user and the website visitor. Extenders also benefit from the success of the WordPress platform.

Contributors

Contributors are the people who contribute to the open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. software (OSS) and the infrastructure that supports the project. These include WordPress.org contributor teams and other volunteers who give their time to the project itself and not necessarily just the extended ecosystem.

Contributors are affected by both the extenders and project leadership. The extenders’ needs are often considered by the contributors, for example with regards to backward compatibility and enabling 3rd party integrations. Project leadership influences the contributors by communicating  vision and future goals for the project.

The contributors make decisions that demonstrate their care for each group to their right: the extenders, the users, and the visitors. If they did not care about the visitor, they would build software that would not help users meet their goals. If they did not care about the user, they would build software that lacked an ecosystem, because no one would use it. If they did not care about extenders, they would not build an extensibleExtensible This is the ability to add additional functionality to the code. Plugins extend the WordPress core software. product.

Leaders

Leadership is a very small group. It includes currently Matt Mullenweg (Project Lead) and Josepha Haden (Executive Director). These two help drive the vision and strategy for WordPress.

They both are directly affected by contributors, because the contributors are the people building and maintaining WordPress, and the community surrounding it. Project leadership relies heavily on the ability and skills of the contributors to ensure the project’s goals are met.

Project leadership carries a duty of care that encompasses every level of WordPress. They work hard to avoid decisions that explicitly harm the other groups. No doubt there will be people who will be affected negatively by a decision, but the decisions at this level are made to support and benefit the majority.

Moving through the groups

Because these group relationships can be ambiguous, it is often unclear how people move between them. In fact, moving between the groups often happens unintentionally, and as the result of expressing more care toward people within one’s own group.

One example is the move from extender to contributor. An extender primarily cares for their own extension product (ie. a plugin), which benefits their users and visitors. At some point, an extender might run into an issue, or innovate on a solution, that can help all extenders. By sharing this solution with contributors and helping to implement it, the extender contributes to the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. software, resulting in a better experience for all other extenders. Their level of care expands through their desire to contribute in a way that benefits others.

Users often become extenders when they can not find the extension that suits their needs. The user, when a solution is not provided by existing extenders, might decide to create their own extension (ie. a plugin) to meet their need. When the user shares their product, they have just become an extender, and their level of care expands to include all other users who might find their product a necessary solution for their own sites.

Overall, WordPress group dynamics generally depend upon the duty of care and levels of influence. The more one cares about other groups, and those in one’s own group, the more likely that person will influence the community in a positive way.

Acknowledgements

Thank you to @chanthaboune @andreamiddleton for their feedback on the content and phrasing of this post!


Feedback

What do you think about this theory of how different parts of the WordPress ecosystem connect and relate to each other? Does this description sound mostly right to you, or do you have an experience or perspective that conflicts with this set of ideas? I’d love to know your thoughts!

#community

Announcement: Incident Response Training

TL;DR: Now that there is a first version of the code of conduct for the WordPress project, incident response training is available to anyone interested in learning more about how to take and respond to incident reports. Further, I would like to build a team who is prepared to help the WordPress community when something goes against the new code of conduct, and ask you to help me identify those individuals. 

A new code of conduct for the WordPress project has been announced! This is a great step towards helping current and future WordPress community members and contributors understand how we aspire to work together in “official” spaces. This code of conduct being new, I’m sure there are many questions around how it will be applied and carried out. 

To that end, the Community team has created training for incident response, covering topics like expectations when doing this work, how to take incident reports, and how to respond to reports. This training is now live on Learn WordPress, and available to everyone interested. 

Another important piece of this is helping people understand where they can go when they see behavior or actions that don’t match the code of conduct. I am excited to announce that a new incident response team will be created. To be clear, the responsibility of the incident response team is not to actively search for or monitor behavior. Instead, this team will be a resource to the community for when things don’t go as expected.

The work of taking and responding to incident reports requires a high degree of professionalism and emotional intelligence, and it is often invisible and difficult work. Because of this, individuals will be vetted and will need to complete training prior to joining the WordPress incident response team. Read on for all the details! 

How to join the WordPress incident response team

To best serve the community, incident response team members need to be able to remain calm when faced with difficult situations and possess exceptional listening and communication skills. When responding to incidents, they need to be able to maintain confidentiality* wherever possible, and think objectively. 

Because of this, I would like to request nominations to this team instead of asking for volunteers. Please complete the form below to submit your nomination of who you think would be a good candidate for this team.

Nominations will go through a vetting process similar to what the Community team does for organizers. For incident response team members, vetting will include:

  • Making sure they are in good standing with WordPress
  • Familiarity with WordPress and open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. practices is a plus
  • Perfunctory review of social media
  • Checking for compliance with the GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples.
  • Reviewing any examples of excellent communication

Further, it is important that the incident response team be diverse to reflect our global community, and this will be a consideration for the final make up of the team. The vetting will be done by myself (@angelasjin), @juliarosia, @ipstenu, and @kcristiano and @chanthaboune will give final approval. 

It is my hope that incident response team members can commit to being on the team for one full year. Depending on the volume of incident reports, they can expect to contribute anywhere between 2 to 20 hours a month. In addition, to help incident response team members be as successful as possible, they are expected to complete required training prior to joining the team. 

Training for the incident response team

While anyone can complete the incident response training on Learn WordPress, potential incident response team members will complete the same training alongside peers in a cohort. The cohort will meet synchronously four times (one hour-ish each), across the span of a month, to discuss incident response team training modules and practice through role play. There will be optional, highly recommended office hours and additional opportunities to practice learned skills. 

In addition, incident response team members will be required to complete DEI training, offered by an external consultant who will be prepared to offer DEI training for WordPress’ global contexts. 

The time commitment for this training will be approximately 2-3 hours per week at minimum, across five (possibly six) weeks. 

As with any team, I hope that we will continue to bring on new team members over time! While there are no immediate plans to have this cohort again, the intent with this first cohort is to put our best forward, gather feedback from the cohort, and iterate for the next group.

Questions? Comments? Feedback?

This is a brand new thing! What questions or feedback do you have? Share them in the comments below.

*A note on confidentiality: while the WordPress project tries to work transparently and in public spaces as much as possible, for the safety of community members, incident response needs to be treated confidentially wherever possible. However, anonymized, annual reports (similar to what the Community team has done in the past) will be published.

Quarterly Updates | Q3 2020

To keep all aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress volunteer teams, each team’s listed representative has shared an update from the start of the year. Listed below are their top priorities (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest wins and Challenges. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility 

  • Contacted: @nrqsnchz, @ryokuhi
  • Priority: The main focuses of the AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) Team for WordPress 5.6 are: moving the WordPress Accessibility Coding Standards from WCAGWCAG WCAG is an acronym for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. These guidelines are helping make sure the internet is accessible to all people no matter how they would need to access the internet (screen-reader, keyboard only, etc) https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/. 2.0 to WCAG 2.1 and improving the documentation to include more resources and describe patterns and antipatterns; making the new default theme (Twenty Twenty-One) ready for WCAG AAA; creating a feature pluginFeature Plugin A plugin that was created with the intention of eventually being proposed for inclusion in WordPress Core. See Features as Plugins. to add a tool to generate an Accessibility Statement, as was done with Privacy Policy.
  • Previous Priority: Organization of WordPress Accessibility Day; review of the admin color schemes; creation of alternative views for WP List Tables; improvement of the “Howdy” fly-out menu.
  • Challenge: The team faced challenges in polarizing discussions among members and across teams around design and architecture choices. In addition, the team had difficulty tracking all of the development in the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor.
  • Big Win: WordPress Accessibility Day happened on October 2-3 2020; there was a lot of positive feedback. In addition, the team is taking steps to include new contributors in the team by using the `good-first-bug` label more widely, both on CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. tickets and on GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ issues

CLI 

  • Contacted: @schlessera
  • Priority: There’s one outstanding bug for v2.5.0, so that version will be released soon.
  • Previous Priority: The number one priority was getting 2.5.0 released.
  • Challenge: WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ has also opted into Hacktoberfest, as every year, so I’m hoping that will give a small uptick to current contribution levels.
  • Big Win: All of the compatibility hassles are solved, and tests are green across the board.

Community 

  • Contacted: @camikaos, @mariaojob
  • Priority: The current priority is engagement with WordPress users and community members through continued education and connection with Learn WordPress while providing support to our WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers with online events.
  • Previous Goal: To facilitate the ongoing education of WordPress through online interaction. 
  • Challenges:  The team’s current challenges include a lack of consistent mentorship for organizers, uncertainty in the future of events, and discernable contributor fatigue.
  • Big win: Soft launch of Learn WordPress.

Core 

  • Contacted: @francina, @audrasjb
  • Priority: Continue to work on the 5.6 release.
  • Previous Priority: Successfully releasing 5.5 in August and preparing work for the remaining 2020 goals due in the 5.6 release later this year.
  • Challenge: Some tickets and tasks are delayed multiple times because of low engagement from component maintainers and committers. The jQuery rollout plan seems to be more difficult than expected.
  • Big Win: REST APIREST API The REST API is an acronym for the RESTful Application Program Interface (API) that uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST and DELETE data. It is how the front end of an application (think “phone app” or “website”) can communicate with the data store (think “database” or “file system”) https://developer.wordpress.org/rest-api/. password inclusion and kicking off WP 5.6 female-led release with over 40 women participating.

Design 

  • Contacted: @estelaris, @karmatosed
  • Priority: Reviewing tracking systems for design tickets; supporting the release and design cohort with focused work; iterating our processes to support the diverse designers contributing.
  • Previous Priority: Sync triages with releases.
  • Challenge: The ‘firehose’ and stream of meetings. Time Zones continue to be a challenge so things like having alternative meetings are being explored and limiting meeting frequency and times.
  • Big Win: Continuing to improve our documentation, and enabling tasks such as the about page to be easier for the next team.

Docs

  • Contacted: @kenshino
  • Priority: Develop an overall documentation information architecture; improve discoverability & usability on all documentation; Refine the “getting started” processes (video and text) for onboarding of contributors; apply the external linking policy in PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Developer Handbook; Google Season of Docs projects
  • Stretch Goal: We want to research and implement best practices of documentation in other CMS projects.
  • Previous Priority: Keep up with Gutenberg updates and handbook structure and updates.
  • Challenge: A lack of capacity to document our processes; WordPress official documentation doesn’t have proper editorial controls; Cooperation with other teams and staying current to new features; there is no official strategy or target of internationalization of Handbooks or DevHub. 
  • Big Win: We have started a Gutenberg user doc team; two projects were selected for Google Summit of Docs; formed an “Onboarding” team whose task is to develop communication with new contributors; started “Coffee break” zoom meetings once a month where team members can chat and get to know each other.

Hosting

  • Contacted: @amykamala @mikeschroder @jadonn
  • Priority: Priorities include PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. 8 Compatibility for distributed hosting tests, helping inactive test reporters start reporting again, and improving the process.
  • Previous Priority: The hosting team’s prioritized supporting communication between WordPress and WP Hosts to help assure synchronicity between the WordPress Open SourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. Project and hosts that provide WordPress offerings, and improving engagement within the #hosting-community team.
  • Challenge: As with last quarter, the biggest challenge is consistency. The team has maintained more inertia this quarter, but there are periods of time that are more and less active, which have made long term projects harder to complete.
  • Big Win: Error reporting with the distributed tests has been improved, making it so that both errors and failures are displayed. This makes it easier to track down what test errors/failures are trending across hosts.

Marketing 

  • Contacted: @webcommsat, @harryjackson1221, @maedahbatool, @miker, @yvettesonneveld
  • Priority: Support 5.6 release marcomms, scheduling internal requests, ongoing communications-related onboarding tasks to support teams and WordPress events; improve understanding of the open source and WordPress to help new contributors get started; support for internal communications.
  • Previous Priority: Supporting the WordPress 5.5 release, marketing the diverse speaker training events, and contributor onboarding support leading to WCUS.
  • Challenge: Planning task delivery with limited advance information on contributor availability and with current circumstances affecting contributors’ hope to contribute regularly due to pressures from the impact of COVID; implementing adaptable workflows that can be replicated for new contributors.
  • Big Win: Improved cross-team collaboration, including wider Marcomms resources for 5.5, WordPress Translation celebration week, Learn WordPress launch and communications, and diverse speaker training; a more pro-active and strategic approach to social media campaigns, such as Online WordPress Meetups and Diversity Speaker Workshops

Mobile 

  • Contacted: @elibud
  • Priority: Port more core blocks, improve UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it. and performance, and introduce block transformations before the end of 2020.
  • Previous Priority: Improve the block editor’s performance, add support for more blocks, and enhance currently supported blocks.
  • Challenge: The editor release process still takes a lot of time and attention, the testing infrastructure is not robust enough leading to failures/flakiness, and the ReactReact React is a JavaScript library that makes it easy to reason about, construct, and maintain stateless and stateful user interfaces. https://reactjs.org/. Native upgrade process is still slow.
  • Big Win: Robust biweekly releases with new features, blocks, block improvements, and bug fixes.

Polyglots 

  • Contacted: @nao, @ocean90, @casiepa, @tobifjellner
  • Priority: As always, the core translation for the next release is the first priority. The next priority as a global team is to help inactive & under-resourced teams find new contributors and set attainable goals.
  • Previous Priority: Getting 5.5 translated by all active locales.
  • Challenge: More than half of the available locale teams are inactive, and active teams are struggling to process the review workload
  • Big win: Successful Translation Day event; more contributor involvement at the global level & within some of the reactivated/new teams

Security 

  • Contacted: @whyisjake
  • Priority: The security team is focused on prepping for the next security release.
  • Previous Priority: The team focused on furthering the work surrounding auto-updates in plugins and themes, and then in 5.6 transitioning that same effort to core auto-updates.
  • Challenge: Right now the security team is trying to get back to a regular cadence of security releases, with the goal to bundle releases with every minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality..
  • Big Win: We are really excited about auto-updates for plugins in themes from WordPress 5.5, and auto-updates coming to WordPress core in 5.6. Application passwords look great too!

Support 

  • Contacted: @Clorith
  • Priority: Retaining our volunteers across the international forums.
  • Previous Priority: Our top priority was prepping for the next major releaseMajor Release A set of releases or versions having the same major version number may be collectively referred to as “X.Y” -- for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, and all other versions in the 5.2. (five dot two dot) branch of that software. Major Releases often are the introduction of new major features and functionality., 5.5.
  • Challenge: The biggest challenge is getting new contributors.
  • Big Win: The whole team has been handling the increase in help requests after WP 5.5, giving replies in a timely manner, and the work to translate helphub on the various languages who have access to it already.

Themes

  • Contacted: @williampatton @kafleg @acosmin @acalfieri @aristath @poena
  • Priority: The team will continue to focus on helping theme authors transition to more block-based themes.
  • Previous Priority: Helping theme authors transition to more block based themes.
  • Challenge: Theme suspensions and a lack of plan for the rebuilding of the theme directory.
  • Big Win: Reduced waiting time in the review queue; default theme; a full site editing theme added to the directory.

Tide 

  • Contacted: @derekherman, @jeffpaul
  • Priority: Update underlying infrastructure from Golang to Node.js to allow for broader contributions and make maintenance more feasible.
  • Previous Priority:  Resolve rate limiting and caching issues to allow v1.0.0 release.  ETA: Prior to COVID-19 we had targeted WCEU, but team member personal and professional delays likely mean v1.0.0 by WCUS.
  • Challenge: Finding contributors with experience with PHPCSPHP Code Sniffer PHP Code Sniffer, a popular tool for analyzing code quality. The WordPress Coding Standards rely on PHPCS., Golang, and Google Cloud Platform to help with enhancing Tide.
  • Big Win: Starting the progress of Node.js foundation build-out.

Triage 

  • Contacted: @desrosj, @sergeybiryukov
  • Priority: Continuing to bring the total number of tickets in TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. down to a more reasonable number, and to ensure that every ticket is accurate and actionable.
  • Previous Priority: We focused on lowering the total number of tickets in Trac to a more reasonable number.
  • Challenge: The two main team members have had their resources consumed by a combination of various active roles in recent releases and new contributor mentoring.
  • Big Wins: Despite considerable involvement in the last few release cycles, the team has managed to keep the overall number of open tickets roughly the same. The team is also proud of the mentoring efforts underway for the 5.6 release squad, educating them about ticket lifecycles and good triaging practices.

TV

  • Contacted: @nishasingh, @casiepa, and @rahuldsarker
  • Priority: Collect the WordCamp videos from organizers and make them public. Correct the speaker’s name and tags of submitted/ published videos.
  • Previous Priority: Remove the video and subtitle backlog so that by September all is published.
  • Challenge: More people join and actively work with us.
  • Big Win: Cleared the pending review videos queue. Within 20 minutes subtitle of a submitted WPTV’s video can be created in English.

With thanks to team leads for their quarterly updates and a special thanks to @angelasjin for her help with this post.

#quarterly-updates

Themes team update January 04, 2023

i) 🎟 Theme directory stats

Currently,

  • 0 new ticket is waiting for review.
    • 0 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 0 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 48 tickets are assigned.
    • 3 ticket is older than 4 weeks
    • 23 ticket is older than 2 weeks
    • 30 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 41 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 0 is approved but is waiting to be made live.

In the past 7 days,

  • 388 tickets were opened
  • 349 tickets were closed
    • 338 tickets were made live.
      • 24 new Themes were made live.
      • 314 Theme updates were made live.
      • 1 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
    • 2 tickets were not-approved.
    • 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

Note: These stats include both the new theme tickets and updated theme tickets as well.

Number of reviewers: 3 (@kafleg@acosmin@shivashankerbhatta)

ii) 💻 BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Theme Stats

  • 10 Block themes are currently reviewing
  • We have 205 Block Themes in the themes repository.

iii) 💡HelpScout Stats

In the past 7 days,

Email Conversations 10Messages Received 18
Replies Sent 12Emails Created 0
Resolved 7Resolved on First Reply 71%

iv) ✅ Extras

  • Create Block Theme pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party now has 800+ active installs. There are 24 active issues and 3 Pull requests in GitHub.

#themes, #weekly-updates