WordPress Agencies: We Want Your Case Studies

Case studies are a great resource for agencies to share with prospective clients. The Make WordPress Marketing Team is collecting them in the best way we know how -- open source. Case studies are a great resource for agencies to share with prospective clients. The Make WordPress Marketing Team is collecting them in the best way we know how — open source. (Updated 11/28/18)

Submit your case studies in this simple survey.

We want to understand how WordPress as a CMS is used, and we’d love your help to do it.

Why should you do it?

Putting case studies together is not easy work. It’s difficult to find the right words to explain a complex project and do it in a way that others find interesting to read.

The Make WordPress Marketing Team would like to help! And in turn, we’d love you to help us.

In our survey, we’ve created a format to help you tell your story, so you don’t have to worry about writing huge chunks of text. You can simply use this framework and get them done quickly and effectively, whilst still telling the project story in full. It’s also a great opportunity for you to showcase your most interesting projects and clients.

The survey is broken down into six key parts;

  • The Project
  • The Challenge
  • Why WordPress
  • The Obstacle
  • The Solution
  • The Results

Take a look at our published case studies to date. Continue reading

#case-studies, #marketing

Marketing Team Notes – December 12, 2018

Marketing Team Vision

Our vision for the Marketing Team is to be the go-to resource on strategy and content for other WordPress teams. We reiterate our mission each week so that everyone who is new to the team understands what our goals are. This helps with onboarding.

We’d love you to join the Marketing Team. If you have any questions or feel lost (all of us do at some point), please feel free to ping any of us in Slack. We’re here to help guide and mentor you. xoxo ~ Bridget (@gidgey on Slack)

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. And, yes, you can add yourself to any Trello Card you’d like to work on.

Today’s Meeting

Slack Timestamp

Today’s notes taken by: @maedahbatool

Meeting Attended By: @maedahbatool, @siobhanseija, @daveloodts, @gidgey, @miker, @harryjackson1221, Jesse Owens, @gtarafdar@jenblogs4u, @coachbirgit, @abhanonstopnewsuk

Last Week’s Successes

Task Lead Updates

New Business

  • @abhanonstopnewsuk: From WordCamp Milano Contributor Day. @Max has started a draft blog on ‘why someone should contribute to WordPress’. He has had input in from a number of other contributors and some feedback/fact checking has now been received. I am working with him on this and we are setting up the Trello card. We are aiming to have this ready for the first edit by next week’s meeting.
  • @abhanonstopnewsuk: Request from WP&UP Charity if we can promote its mental health campaign in the WordPress community which has started this month with DecemBuddies (@gidgey has been featured already), will have a survey in Jan and the main campaign in February. Some pointers are being drafted and will be shared with marketing if it is felt this is something that can be promoted on Make WordPress Marketing. 
  • @abhanonstopnewsuk: There is a new sustainability channel being set up by WordCamp organizers and with the community. A draft blog submission to get some help from marketing to promote this. There are questions for the community team on the link to use for the channel so that organizers in other countries can access it. Once they have this, a draft submission will be added to a Trello.
  • @daveloodts: I mentioned this idea of an ‘adopt-a-volunteer’-campaign; or ‘sponsor-a-volunteer’ in this post: https://make.wordpress.org/marketing/2018/12/09/why-your-company-should-contribute-to-wordpress/. Don’t know if #marketing is the place to be or #community. I see it as marketing the community.
  • @miker: https://trello.com/c/IkToXlnz/225-wcus-2018-contributor-day-recap. This would be a great opportunity for a new contributor! This card is for a blog post that will highlight the successes from the WCUS contributor day. The community team also publishes what was accomplished. However, I think we should do a marketing post as well. We spoke a lot about the Five for the Future (FFTF) initiative, and posts like this that show what can be accomplished through contributions are important.
  • @miker: I have one other thing to share from WCUS! We had a number of conversations with different hosts and the Hosting Community team. (Thanks to @Breann McDede and others for participating!). The main takeaway was a strategy to improve our communication with the Hosting Community through more regular direct updates with that team. Using the Gutenberg rollout as an example, the consensus is that it would be useful to have a more formal and defined communication loop. So we are getting direct feedback about what their users are asking, and the types of things they would like to have to distribute to their customers about WordPress. This being said, I will make an effort next year to attend that group as well. The main objective is to establish a communication loop, so we can be more targeted and responsive when creating time-sensitive content.

NOTE: Due to Christmas holidays the marketing team has decided to take a break and skip the meetings for 26th December 2018 and 2nd January 2019. We will resume from the second Wednesday of January which is the 9th. The formal announcement will be made by @siobhanseija in the next week’s meeting. Till then happy holidays folks! 

RollingStone.com – A WordPress Migration and Redesign Case Study

Rolling Stone - Welcome to the New Rolling Stone!

This Case Study is published by the Make WordPress Marketing Team. Provided by XWP, a WordPress-focused engineering firm.

The Project

Rolling Stone is an exceptionally well-loved brand with millions of readers. When Penske Media Corporation (PMC) made a strategic investment in the property, they worked with XWP in 2018 to migrate the site to WordPress while refreshing the brand’s website design.

The Challenge

The challenges for the project included the need to move hundreds of thousands of articles while simultaneously executing a brand new design. Penske needed to trust that the transition was seamless for both readers and the editorial teams alike.

“From the start, we knew that this project would be a significant undertaking due to the vast amount of historical archive data, dating back to the 1960’s, and the brand’s massive fanbase. We approached this project with the necessary care and foresight to ensure a smooth migration and an end product that is built on solid technical grounding.”

Matt Geri | WordPress Architect, XWP

Why WordPress

Rollingstone.com was transitioning from a Content Management System (CMS) that lacked modern editorial features to enable their writers. Additionally, the prior system was missing many of development efficiencies needed to scale the platform to the next stage of growth for their brand. WordPress was quickly identified as the ideal solution because of the ability to create a great experience for content creators while also providing an enterprise-grade core platform to make further development more efficient with the goal of maximizing ad revenue.

The Obstacles

The migration to WordPress faced a few unique challenges. With over 250,000 articles in the backlog and millions of image and media attachments, this migration was also coupled with a full redesign of the website. New plans for editorial features to improve the publishing experience were also introduced as well as an integration with Penske’s existing WordPress website. The obstacles involved ensuring the migration accounted for the functional requirements while also delivering the brand new, high profile refresh of the brand’s online experience.

The Solution

Migration

XWP leveraged Google Cloud Platform to build a highly-scalable import process that handled the transformation of data and images into a WordPress compatible structure without any data loss. This migration process, as is the case with any large migration, was successful because of the time spent on architecting, building, and testing. When the time came to push the migrate button, it ran correctly and efficiently.

Code Quality

With performance, stability and security being the top priorities, code quality was a major priority to set the team up for success in the future. Custom plugins and themes give WordPress its competitive edge. Combined with WordPress VIP as the host, this set the site up for success at launch. XWP used Tide and custom code sniffs to ensure the plugins and themes met WordPress VIP’s coding standards without issue.

Editorial Experience

Rolling Stone regularly breaks down the music, film, and TV industry into list-style articles with a unique layout and design, giving readers a high-level view on a particular topic. The editorial needed an interface that would easily facilitate the production. Working with the editorial team to identify the UX requirements, XWP was able to do the following:

  • Provide ability to number and reorder list items;
  • Provide a custom focal-point image cropping too
  • Provide template selection based on the focus of the article.

Additionally, some of these list-style articles can contain 100’s of items, so implementing a custom pagination solution helped the end reader easily navigate through longer lists.

“This was one of our smoothest and most successful launches to date. Everyone who reviewed the site – both before and after launch – commented on the exceptional quality. This was down to an incredible effort led by you all, with a focus and dedication that was a joy to be involved in.”

Nicola Catton | Senior Project Director, PMC
Rolling Stone: The 100 Greatest Songs of the Century - so far

The Results

By project completion, Rolling Stone had successfully moved decades worth of digital content from their former system over to WordPress and was able to launch the new online expression of their beloved brand with complete confidence. Launch day proved that the focus on code quality and Quality Assurance paid off, with a public release without any hiccups. The business is now positioned to build on its strong historical foundation and move forward into the next phase of growth.

Key Takeaways

  • Smooth as silk launch day
  • Large and complex data migration
  • Improved editorial experience

#case-studies

Why Your Company Should Contribute To WordPress

WordPress runs a third of all websites - and it’s growing fast. WordPress has evolved from its humble beginnings as a blogging platform to becoming the operating system of the Open Web. We believe that WordPress is more important than it’s ever been.

WordPress runs a third of all websites – and it’s growing fast. WordPress has evolved from its humble beginnings as a blogging platform to becoming the operating system of the Open Web. We believe that WordPress is more important than it’s ever been.

And WordPress is lead by volunteers. Thousands of people around the world contribute their time and effort to make WordPress the product, the community, and ecosystem better. Anyone can contribute to it and that provides opportunity for everyone to benefit.

And WordPress needs contribution. As more and more of the web gets built on WordPress, the importance of the WordPress ecosystem being the best it can be increases. We can do that with your help.

We, the WordPress community, want your company to join us in contributing to WordPress.

But why should you? You’re busy running your business, serving your clients and customers. Sure, you love a good cause. But with so many other causes, why contribute to WordPress?

Your Clients and Customers are Already Using WordPress

With more than 32% of the web running on WordPress, WordPress is the tool of choice for many of your current and future clients.

If many of your customers are using WordPress today, then contributing to WordPress and investing in the WordPress community is a great way to serve them — better. Being an active part of the WordPress ecosystem is also great way to attract new customers.

That’s the positive side and where we believe you should focus. On the negative side, though, if you don’t invest in WordPress, if you don’t provide a good experience to your customers who choose to use WordPress, they’ll choose the companies who do.

Get ahead of the curve! Contribute to making WordPress better for your clients and customers who use it today and position yourself for the clients and customers you’ll have the opportunity to serve with WordPress tomorrow.

WordPress is the Operating System of the Web

WordPress is built on the four freedoms of open source software. These freedoms, combined with the focus on providing a great user experience for non-technical users, have been the key to WordPress’ meteoric rise.

It has grown from being a great platform for a blog or personal site to the operating system for the web with a vast ecosystem of themes, plugins, and the businesses and organizations behind them that serve the WordPress economy.

From sites, to communities, to ecommerce, to products, to platforms, people are choosing to build on WordPress. The tools and resources are there and they’re getting better all the time.

As the web evolves to serve new input and output methods, WordPress is evolving with it. From voice input and creating content in virtual reality to making content accessible to users with disabilities and embracing augmented reality, WordPress is there.

As a company, you have the opportunity to contribute to the operating system of the web. As you help make WordPress better, you’re helping set the stage for new opportunities (like developing new “blocks” for Gutenberg) and opening the doors for new possibilities (serving markets that don’t yet exist).

And why does that matter? Because…

The Open Web Matters

The Open Web has changed the world and we have all enjoyed the benefits. As individuals we’ve learned skills, launched careers, formed friendships, and championed causes. As businesses we’ve reached and served clients and customers through the web that we wouldn’t have otherwise.

WordPress’ mission is to democratize publishing for everyone –, for people of all cultures, languages, capabilities, and means.

What if the Web wasn’t open? What if it was all behind a walled garden that only a privileged few could access?

As the importance of the web increases more and more time and money is being poured into closed ecosystems controlled by a few that can choose to limit who can and can’t participate.

WordPress today represents the future of the Open Web and while we firmly believe that it’s a bright future it’s also a future at risk. As a project lead by volunteers we don’t have the resources that these closed, proprietary platforms have.

We have something better, though. A community and an ecosystem that values the freedom to create and to live and serve as citizens of an Open Web.

You and your company benefit from the Open Web. Please, join us in investing in the Open Web and making it better for all.

Be Part of the WordPress Project

As a company, you have the unique opportunity and privilege to contribute to WordPress. By doing so, you can serve your existing clients and customers better and reach new ones. You can be a part of making the operating system of the web better and in so doing help ensure a future where the Open Web is vibrant and strong.

So what’s next? How can you join us?

Learn more at Make WordPress.

Video Roundup: How to Contribute to WordPress

Did you know there are excellent video resources which can help you contribute to the community and market WordPress.org? We've selected some videos from presentations at WordCamps across the world.

Did you know there are excellent video resources which can help you contribute to the WordPress Project? We’ve selected some videos from presentations at WordCamps across the world. They can be useful if you are curious about Contributor Days or preparing to lead a table at an event. Of course, they’re also interesting if you’re new to contributing!

In a series of blogs, we are highlighting a selection of videos on WordPress.tv which have been identified by members of the WordPress community as good marketing resources.

In this first blog, we are sharing three videos which help to explain how you can start making WordPress.org or support others in getting started on their volunteer journey.

WordPress.tv Videos on Contributing to WordPress

Have you ever wondered how you could start contributing to WordPress, or wanted tips on sustaining your contributions? Here are some videos that can help.

Contributing to WordPress Panel

First up, discover how a group of individuals got involved in contributing to the community as they share some tips from their experiences.

Join Kathryn Presner, Yannick Lefebvre, Miriam Goldman, and Mel Choyce in their open discussion at WordCamp Montreal 2017. They talk about the different teams that work on WordPress.org and share tips that just might inspire you to start contributing.

Beginners Guide to Contributions

If you are new to adding to open source projects or unsure of where to start in contributing to WordPress, this video is ideal to watch. Featuring a talk by Josepha Haden, this video shows some of the ways you can get involved with the WordPress Project. Additionally, she encourages long-time contributors to support and encourage first-time contributions.

Josepha’s beginner’s guide to contributions were recorded at WordCamp US 2017. It’s a great talk that helps you, or anyone you’re supporting in this, find their place as a WordPress contributor.

Techniques for Contributing to WordPress Core

Felix Arntz presented a useful guide to contributing to WordPress core and techniques for successful long-term contributions. His talk explores how you can make your volunteer time more efficient, how to find access to developer groups, and how you can make your ideas heard.

This is a very inspiring talk by core contributor Felix, recorded at WordCamp US 2017. Follow him through his life story up to now, and what WordPress has done for him. It is interesting for non-developers as well!

Contribute by Subtitling Videos

WordPress.tv hosts thousands of valuable and fun videos like the three highlighted in this post. At the moment, most of them lack subtitles.

Did you know submitting subtitles is a great way to contribute? It helps improve the accessibility of the videos, and by that their reach. There are tools that make this process easy, so why not try? Subtitles are important and we’d love for you to help out by adding subtitles.

Thank you to the speakers featured, everyone who has contributed to and continues to identify and review videos for marketing WordPress and the community. Thanks to @webcommsat and @siobhanseija for leading this initiative and developing the series.

#contributor-day

Marketing Team Notes – November 28, 2018

Marketing Team Vision

Our vision for the Marketing Team is to be the go-to resource on strategy and content for other WordPress teams. We reiterate our mission each week so that everyone who is new to the team understands what our goals are. This helps with onboarding.

We’d love you to join the Marketing Team. If you have any questions or feel lost (all of us do at some point), please feel free to ping any of us in Slack. We’re here to help guide and mentor you. xoxo ~ Bridget (@gidgey on Slack)

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. And, yes, you can add yourself to any Trello Card you’d like to work on.

Today’s Meeting

Slack Timestamp

Today’s notes taken by: @yvettesonneveld

Meeting Attended By: @mcdwayne, @siobhanseija, @yvettesonneveld, @jenblogs4u, @maedahbatool, @coachbirgit, @gidgey, @miker, @harryjackson1221

Last Week’s Successes

  • Italy celebrated a first: First time they had a marketing table during a contributors day at WCMIL. This was led by @abhanonstopnewsuk and with support from @zetaraffix and @siobhanseija.
  • A marketing team effort to spread the word about a training repo on Github resulted in 10259 impressions, 42 retweets, 61 likes and 76 link clicks.

Task Lead Updates

  • @siobhanseija and @abhanonstopnewsuk worked on a blog to promote subtitling videos. Project has moved to “Needs Approval”.
  • @mcdwayne reported the task regarding creating buzz for the training repo on github is done and thinks this is a great way to have positive impact.
  • @harryjackson1221 invited contributors, and new contributors in particular, to help edit some case studies. DM him if you are interested and need to know how to get started.
  • @siobhanseija reported back that another blog post from @abhanonstopnewsuk highlighting WordPress.tv videos about contributing to WordPress, is ready for approval. Card will be moved to that column. @coachbirgit asks if this is for English language only. There are videos on the list for non-English speakers which could be featured in other languages. We conclude that this would work well for local “rosetta” sites as well. Contact @siobanseija and @abhanonstopnewsuk if you would like to work on this in another language.
  • @siobhanseija mentions @abhanonstopnews won’t be attending today’s meeting and sent her the updates. Social media document and photos done, bar barring the reply from gravatar and Bridget’s feedback.
  • @mcdwayne recommends everyone to update the Trello card first and foremost, so that all contributors can refer back to the card to know where it’s at.   
  • Regarding plans and tasks for WCUS contributor day, @miker suggests to focus on a recruiting plan and how that ties in with 5 for the future. @gigdey suggests to make sure to keep a plan like that focused and manageable. @yvettesonneveld suggests to reach out to agencies. Create an invitation template and have CD contributors reach out to agencies they know. Invite them to reach out to us and we’ll promote the post on social media like we did for the Training Repo on Github. @siobhanseija adds we could post a series of blog posts about companies that already fo 5 for the future, to raise awareness. @miker suggests that finding a way to get contributors badges on LinkedIn could help. @yvettesonneveld recommends creating a company page for the team.

New Business

  • @gidgey reminds us that we’re all available most of the time but have day jobs too.
  • @coachbirgit asks if we have publishing rights for the news section on WordPress.org, to publish, for instance, case studies. Unfortunately, no. Matt personally authorizes what is published on the news section. Josefa is trying to get case studies a more front facing spot, but its moving slowly, especially with all focus on 5.0 now.
  • @mcdwayne will be on sabbatical from right after WCUS until early February. @jenblogs4you and @miker thank @mcdwayne for all he has done.
  • @mcdwayne thanks @siobhanseija for stepping up and showing up consistently.

These videos need subtitling — And you can help!

By subtitling some of the videos on WordPress.tv, you can contribute to the WordPress Project. Help us extend the reach of this amazing library of resources on WordPress.tv. The talks are well worth it!

Thousands of useful and fascinating videos can be found at WordPress.tv from the range of talks held at WordCamps and other WordPress-related events. Think of meetups, interviews, testimonials, WordPress Translation Days, and so on. Did you know that there are close to 10,000 videos on WordPress.tv? That’s a serious archive right there. Started in January 2009, we’ve come a long way.

You can choose from an online collection of interesting presentations and interviews filmed across the world. Through these free to access videos, you can share in the experience of WordCamps and other WordPress-related events. By subtitling some of the videos, you can contribute. Help us extend the reach of this amazing library of resources on WordPress.tv. The talks are well worth it!”

People from across the WordPress community donate their time and skills to present these talks. From developers and designers to content creators and community representatives. These professionals and enthusiasts share their experiences and knowledge freely with others. That’s open source! The volunteer WordPress.tv team support WordCamps and the community on making these videos available and managing the resource.

These videos also need subtitling. And that’s where you could join in! Subtitling is important and you can contribute without needing any coding skills.

Why do WordPress.tv videos need subtitles?

There are so many wonderful and informative videos published on WordPress.tv. Unfortunately, only a very small number of them offer subtitles. Why does that matter?

1) Foremostly, a subtitled video is more accessible. Subtitles assist people with hearing difficulties to share the experience of the talk and access the information within it.

“Being deaf/hard of hearing means there is certain information I struggle to access… accurate subtitles/captions and good quality audio is essential for me in order to be able to consume video/audio-based content. Too many times I have had to cancel listening to a podcast or watching a video on the web within seconds after starting because of the audio or lack of captions or transcripts. The learning experience can be a hugely frustrating one if what I want to learn is not accessible to me.” 

Ahmed Khalifa, WordCamp Organizer

2) The text can enable people to watch a video without needing sound. This can be, for instance, when accessing it at work or on the train.

3) Subtitles could also be translations. They help people that don’t fully understand the talk in its original language. For instance, an English talk could also have French subtitles.

4) Subtitles can reinforce professional development opportunities and with deciphering unfamiliar jargon or terms. WordPress.tv video segments are used by some WordPress Meetups. Subtitles can help with access for their audiences, general learning, and aid participation.

5) The subtitled text can also be used on other channels if the video or part of it is featured as part of a WordCamp promotion on other video platforms, such as Vimeo or YouTube.

Creating Subtitles is Easy

You don’t need specific skills or experience to contribute subtitles. It’s easy as this:

  • Choose a Video
  • Create the Caption File
  • Submit File to WordPress.tv team for Review

As the WordPress Marketing team, we will be featuring useful videos of WordCamp talks during the next months. We hope that doing so will, among other things, inspire more people to join in and subtitle videos on WordPress.tv. Let’s make these videos more accessible so they reach a wider audience!

Great subtitling tools are available at no cost, like Amara.org. Amara offers an easy interface in which you can enter subtitles and set the correct timings while watching the video. It’s also easy to use when creating subtitles in a different language than the video is in.

How to create subtitles for WordPress.tv

The WordPress.tv team has done a great job explaining how to add captions or subtitles to a WordPress.tv video already. Here’s a great short video that walks you through the steps of subtitling for WordPress.tv.

Quite easy right? Amara lets you save your progress so you can get back to it at any time. That way, even if you only have a few minutes to spare, you can add another few lines of subtitles.

At the moment, the WordPress.tv team is uploading videos to YouTube as well. YouTube adds automatically generated subtitles, which can be edited afterward. This could make things a lot easier! Check out the WordPress YouTube channel.

Subtitles or translations?

For subtitling, all you need to do is watch the video and write the lines that you hear, in the language they’re spoken. If you are so inspired by the video talk, you can add a translation too! A lot of videos on WordPress.tv are English spoken. Adding other language transcripts increases accessibility and usability for these wonderful resources.

Getting started

Subtitling is a flexible way of contributing. You can work on specific subtitles when and where you want to. You could work on them for a couple of hours or for ten minutes at a time. The length of videos also differs: short and long are videos available for subtitling. Take your pick!

Visit WordPress.tv, find a video that you enjoy and get started. Of course, it’s a good idea to check if the video has already been subtitled. Most of them aren’t, which is why it would be great to have you helping out.

We will be featuring regular blog posts on the Make WordPress Marketing blog (link: https://make.wordpress.org/marketing/) that highlight videos from WordPress.tv.

Thanks to @siobhanseija and @webcommsat for this blog series and leading the project. Thanks to @casiepa and @drbe4t for their input. Thank you to all those who are subtitling the WordPress.tv videos.

Marketing Team Notes – November 21, 2018

Marketing Team Vision

Our vision for the Marketing Team is to be the go-to resource on strategy and content for other WordPress teams. We reiterate our mission each week so that everyone who is new to the team understands what our goals are. This helps with onboarding.

We’d love you to join the Marketing Team. If you have any questions or feel lost (all of us do at some point), please feel free to ping any of us in Slack. We’re here to help guide and mentor you. xoxo ~ Bridget (@gidgey on Slack)

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. And, yes, you can add yourself to any Trello Card you’d like to work on.

Today’s Meeting

Slack Timestamp

Today’s notes taken by: @miker

Meeting attended by@miker, @brenneradams, @mcdwayne, @slobhanselja, @yvettesonneveld, @jenblogs4u, @maedahbatool, @mjargon

Last Week’s Successes

  • Gutenberg’s launch is almost upon us. @mcdwayne reported some specific examples of companies sharing the message crafted for Gutenberg.
  • @siobhanseija has been organizing the Trello board, and breaking down large macro projects into smaller cards.
  • The tweeting about the link to training resources gathered at least 49+ direct clicks, with only partial data available.
  • @yvettesonneveld is finished with a productive WordCamp Utrecht, and is excited to be available for more marketing projects!

Task Lead Updates

  • @mcdwayne got a number of retweets for his card on the Training Repo and is waiting for statistics on the success of the tweet.
  • @miker reported the card for the Core-Privacy team is still active and being reviewed. No additional information is available at this time.
  • @siobhanseija has three active cards being worked. All are in progress and will be considered done when they are published.
  • @mjargon gave an update on the card for creating resource files of example logos to provide to WordCamps. After the conversation, the card will be updated to define the finished state for the card, and how the resources will be used.

New Business

  • @miker asked about the 5 for the Future marketing, and if there should be any active cards to promote that initiative. He asks about targeting a marketing resource focused on this for WordCamp US, with a specific emphasis on encouraging participating organizations to contribute.
  • @jenblogs4u raised a suggestion focusing on WCUS to gather video from active/users and contributors. There were concerns raised about the overall quality of the videos recorded at events, and how the videos would be used.
  • @miker suggested creating a content calendar at WCUS to organize our targets and objectives for the coming year.
  • @gidgey has a document outlining possible contributor day topics for WCUS, and everybody is highly encouraged to submit suggestions prior to the next meeting.

Marketing Team Notes – November 14, 2018

Marketing Team Vision

Our vision for the Marketing Team is to be the go-to resource on strategy and content for other WordPress teams. We reiterate our mission each week so that everyone who is new to the team understands what our goals are. This helps with onboarding.

We’d love you to join the Marketing Team. If you have any questions or feel lost (all of us do at some point), please feel free to ping any of us in Slack. We’re here to help guide and mentor you. xoxo ~ Bridget (@gidgey on Slack)

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. And, yes, you can add yourself to any Trello Card you’d like to work on.

Today’s Meeting

Slack Timestamp

Today’s notes taken by: @bridgetwillard

Meeting attended by@bridgetwillard @mcdwayne, @coachbirgit, @siobhanseija, @jenblogs4u, @maedahbatool, @joelobo

Last Week’s Successes

Task Lead Updates

New Business


Marketing Team Notes – November 07, 2018

Marketing Team Vision

Our vision for the Marketing Team is to be the go-to resource on strategy and content for other WordPress teams. We reiterate our mission each week so that everyone who is new to the team understands what our goals are. This helps with onboarding.

We’d love you to join the Marketing Team. If you have any questions or feel lost (all of us do at some point), please feel free to ping any of us in Slack. We’re here to help guide and mentor you. xoxo ~ Bridget (@gidgey on Slack)

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. And, yes, you can add yourself to any Trello Card you’d like to work on.

Today’s Meeting

Slack Timestamp

Today’s notes taken by: @siobhanseija

Meeting attended by: @gidgey, @mcdwayne, @miker, @harryjackson1221, @maedahbatool, @jenblogs4u, @westcounty.media, @coachbirgit, @abhanonstopnewsuk, @siobhanseija, @joelobo

Celebrations

  • @coachbirgit: Thanks to last week’s conversation, the local German team created a dedicated Trello board and Drive folder.
  • @abhanonstopnewsuk has been talking to a lot of WP agencies about filling in the case study survey. A lot of positive reactions!

New Person Thread

  • @gidgey would like to reiterate that work can (and should) be done outside of the meeting. If you cannot attend, that doesn’t mean you cannot contribute!

Task Lead Updates

Write a “How to Create a WordPress Business Website” Guide on WP Marketing

Trello Linkhttps://trello.com/c/ZvNV8hpj/194-write-a-how-to-create-a-wordpress-business-website-guide

Task Lead: @joelobo and @abhanonstopnewsuk

Status: Red Circle

  • @gidgey feels this is probably too long (2600+ words), that’s too much copy to get accepted to WP.org. Might be publishable as is on the Marketing blog.
  • @abhanonstopuk says publishing on the marketing blog is fine and isn’t clear yet about what it means to add it to the trac board for Meta. @joelobo asks if they need to work on a landing page for dot org as well?

Case Study for Land Trust Alliance by 2 Dogs Media

Trello Linkhttps://trello.com/c/Nn1iSkQ7/207-case-study-for-land-trust-alliance-by-2-dogs-media

Status: Red Dot

  • @gidgey has pinged @goldsteinmedia for this card, as they were looking for a task to pick up. @abhanonstopnewsuk offers to add it to the list to work on at WC Milan.

Social Media Poster Template for Contribution Event

Trello Linkhttps://trello.com/c/XHr8V12s/217-social-media-poster-template-for-contribution-events

Task Lead: @abhanonstopnewsuk (marketing) and @zetaraffix (design)

  • @mcdwayne would like to know what the goal of this card is. Is it making a Canva template?
  • @gidgey says it cannot be.
  • Cleared up by @abhanonstopnewsuk and @zetaraffix: they suggest the template to be on the Marketing Google Drive and a blog posted on the marketing blog. It’ll probably be a .psd (Photoshop file) that organizers can use to drop in pictures and hashtags, while using the incorporated branding. Abha and Raffaella are meeting in person soon, they’ll clear things up then.

Studio Z/Miedziak Regional News Site Case Study

Trello Linkhttps://trello.com/c/f7fOmYXI/202-need-more-info-studio-z-miedziak-regional-news-site-case-study

Status: Red Circle

  • @gidgey needs more information and has emailed Studio Z (again).

New business

  • @abhanonstopnewsuk has brought in some new cards from contributor days and marketing videos. They are in the wish list on Trello for anyone who wants to take them on.
  • @mcdwayne’s new card: sharing (i.e. on Twitter) the efforts of the WP Training team. He’s chosen a repository to share and the card is completed when that’s been tweeted about by marketing team members 10 times. See card: https://trello.com/c/ke6SpQWt/221-tweet-the-training-resource-wptrainingteam-choosing-and-installing-themes-10-times.
  • @joelobo sent in a question about attributing writers when we publish on the Marketing blog. There’s no way of adding users/giving more people access. Consensus: adding a line at the end of each blog stating who’s contributed to it. Important: it’s your own responsibility to add your name to a working doc, or you won’t be mentioned!

Other

  • The link to share the form for submitting a case study: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe9cYQRDtJCcI1nphPTfO_Lb7qAGJP68l0_ceyj0uMNzOwI2g/viewform.
  • @gidgey registered http://bit.ly/SubmitWPCaseStudy as a vanity URL. This makes the link easier to remember and share!
  • @gidgey has a note: There are a lot of projects going on and we’d like to keep our done = ______ as concise and achievable as possible.
  • My request is that we only each lead one active Trello task at a time. Active = in progress.
  • This will help us from not being overwhelmed as task leads, not overwhelming the project leads and the Team Reps.
  • Can we, as a team, agree to this?
  • @gidgey also states: I’d also like to remind that done = will be one of the following 95% of the time.
  • done = published to our blog
  • done = uploaded to WordPress.TV
  • done = turned in Google Doc to another team

How to Create a Business Website with WordPress

Is having an online presence important or useful for your organization? Let’s talk about how to create a business website using WordPress.

Is having an online presence important or useful for your organization? Then creating a business website is one of the first steps you will take. It is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to find clients both locally and around the world.

So how do you actually create a website?  We will take you through the ten key steps.

First, let us look at why you should build your business website using WordPress.org

Why you should create your business website with WordPress

WordPress is one of the most trusted and used Content Management Systems (CMS) and platforms in the world. Reasons for choosing WordPress include:

  • 31% of all websites run on WordPress. With nearly two billion websites in the world, that is a lot of users putting their confidence in WordPress.
  • Websites small and large use WordPress. From personal blogs to large newsgathering sites like CNN, WordPress can handle all types of sites.
  • Get the look you want. You can create a unique style for your website by utilizing thousands of free and paid themes available for WordPress.
  • Huge community available to support you. WordPress users can access help and support from one of the largest Open Source communities consisting of developers, writers, editors, and designers. You will find no end to the amount of assistance available in the community’s support forum.

If you are a small business operating on a tight budget, using WordPress helps you build an online presence more easily. The WordPress Open Source CMS is free to download and use. You need to pay for your domain, hosting, and maintenance (if you choose to hire a developer).

You also have the option to join an amazing network of people by contributing to one of the WordPress groups. These groups are organized at https://make.wordpress.org/

Now that you have chosen WordPress to help run the website for your organization, we will explore what you will need to build it.

Create Your Domain Name and Business Email

A domain name is the website ‘name’ or the web address where users can visit your site, like www.yourcompany.com. There are a variety of top-level domains available. These can be country-specific and have a suffix like .com, .uk, .ie or represent the type of organization for example .biz, .org

Many domains will have an option for you to choose an email address which uses your website address, for instance, hello@yourcompany.com

An email address where prospective clients or customers can contact you is a vital part of having an online presence. It may not look as professional if you use a personal email address.

You can purchase a domain name through a domain name registrar. There are a number of registrars available. Each one is equipped with its own set of features and comes with a number of advantages and disadvantages. Once you have identified the one that fits your organization, you can pay to register your domain name for a set period, from a year to a maximum available from that particular registrar.

Domain Name Registrar

Many of the domain name registrars will also offer email addresses for your business at an additional cost. While you are viewing the benefits of each registrar it is a good idea to see which email package fits what you require based on the number of accounts you can create and amount of storage you might need.

Now that you have your name and contact details set up, it is time to think about exactly what you want from your website.

What does Your Website Offer?

It can be beneficial for an organization to have an online presence. But do you know what you want it to achieve?

A starting point is to consider what makes your offering unique. In other words, why will people want to buy your products or services? One of the best ways to do this is to write one clear sentence outlining your company’s value proposition.

The next step is to plan what your website will include. This can include text, images, selling or sign-up options. Make a list of the features and functionality you will need. Do you need an FAQ page to answer complex questions? What about a blog? Do you need an eCommerce option to make online sales? Do you need a contact form?

At the top of this list should be what you will include on your homepage. It can’t have everything so you will need to choose what elements are the most important to your organization. This can be by considering what will maximize customer conversions – whether that is for sales, leads, subscribers or anything else

This screenshot shows how you can add pages to your website using WordPress.

What is your branding?

A strong brand is important for businesses of all sizes. It improves recognition of your organization and fosters confidence in it which, in turn, can generate more repeat customers.

The first step is to design your logo which is consistent with your existing brand or helps you define one for your company. If you do not have an offline logo you can adapt for the web, you can either design one yourself using a graphic editors or hire a design agency or freelancer. The style and wording that form part of a logo are aimed at reflecting your business and its offerings. You will want your logo to reflect your company in a meaningful way and this can be discussed and developed as you explore what you want through the design process.

Another factor to take into account is your logo’s color — something you will also need to think about for the website as a whole. Different colors create different emotions for customers. Are you creating a youthful brand or one that is a bit more mature? Your color palette can help you develop and market your brand.

Web colors are different than the ones you work with offline. There are a number of online palette tools which can help you choose web-friendly and accessible colors, find schemes which are close to your printed publication ones, and better understand how different audiences may react to your choices.

How will you build your site?

There are two general approaches to building your business website — either doing it yourself or hiring a developer to help with part or the entire project.

If your knowledge of coding is mainly basic HTML and CSS, you can build your business website using WordPress or using a drag and drop WordPress page builder. Page builders allow you to customize much of your website without having to write complex coding yourself. However, while page builders are much more powerful nowadays, they still come with some limitations.

Page builders

The new WordPress Editor named Gutenberg has features aimed at supporting you in developing your website pages and posts through the use of blocks.

Gutenberg and WordPress


If you have limited time and would like to work alongside a web specialist, you can hire a developer, web designer, or a web content builder familiar with using the WordPress CMS. When hiring a developer, make sure they have have a track record of building reliable, fast websites, is aware of mobile-design and has an understanding of search engine optimization (SEO).

Who will host your website?

You will need a hosting space for your website. This is where the website will live.

Before selecting a host, carry out some research on what might best fit your organization’s needs. There are generally three main factors to consider when picking a host:
● speed
● customer support
● uptime

You can start by reviewing the hosts recommended by WordPress.org.

Hosting

What will your website look like?

Think about the look and feel you want to have for your website look and and how it is going to fit in or change your existing organization’s branding.

On WordPress you can browse through thousands of themes to select one which will help your website content stand out. In the Theme Directory, you can find out more about each theme, whether it is compatible with your version of WordPress and the experience of other users. Here are some factors to consider when picking your theme and theme provider:

● is it being regularly maintained?
● are other users of the theme satisfied with what it offers?
● does it support your chosen plugins?
● will it help make your website easier to find by search engines (more on this later)?

WordPress Theme Directory

What content will you add to your website?

Good content is what brings people to your website, stay there, and eventually make a purchase or build their relationship with your organization. This is why you will need to plan the information and how it is structured. Here are some things to think about:

  • What information do you want your customers to find on your homepage? In WordPress you have lots of options from a static homepage with a welcome message to a series of blog posts and sections showcasing your products or services
  • What will appear on the landing pages (the webpage visitors reach when they follow an external link to your website)?
  • What is the strategy for the type and style of your regular articles? These may be in the form of a blog or updates to your news pages
  • When creating content, think about how people will find your information when they are searching the internet (more on search engine optimization below).

How will your website be found?

How do you get people to find your site in the first place so that you can engage with them and encourage them to spend time on the content you are providing?

Developing a solid search engine optimization (SEO) strategy is vital. There are lots of good templates available which can be adapted for an organization’s needs and incorporate useful tips from members of the WordPress community. By following a SEO strategy, you will be helping potential customers find your website through their online searches, which in turn can improve your sales conversions and increase brand awareness.

There are two avenues you can go down to increase search traffic: paid or organic.

  • Paid search involves an advertising budget to increase a search engine result when someone types in a word or phrase.
  • Organic search is based on publishing content using good SEO practices.

An effective way to organically optimize your results is by researching “long tail keywords.” To illustrate, a shoe company may want to rank first for “shoes” as may thousands of other firms. Given the popularity of the keyword “shoes,” you would need to spend a lot of money to rank well for that specific term.

A better option would be to target long tail keywords, for example, “women’s white air force 1s.” The keyword “shoes” will have more searches, but the consumers typing in “women’s white air force 1s” are much more likely to make a purchase. If your search engine strategy involves paying for Google Ads, it can be cheaper to pay for long tail keywords than a keyword like “shoes.”

Google Ads

Once you have planned your keywords, you can also plan how they link with each other. A URL map (also known as keyword mapping) can help:

  • your visitors in their journey around your site
  • encourage visitors to explore material you have linked together
  • help search engines in mapping the usefulness of your information, pages and posts
  • assist you in developing new content and promotion opportunities as the maps can help identify what other pages should link to each other and the keywords you are using on different pages.

Can your website scale?

Now that you have your SEO strategy planned, you will need to ensure that your website is capable to support your needs in delivering it.

WordPress plugins are like apps which you can use to add new features and functionality to your website. Plugins need regular updates to gain new functionality and to help keep your website secure.

SEO Plugins 


Your first step could be to install an SEO plugin to assist you in maintaining your website SEO by:

  • optimizing your content
  • giving you more control of your breadcrumbs (navigation paths which appear at the top of your page and help search engines understand your website’s structure
  • allowing you to set SEO meta-info for pages and archives
  • and through a number of other functions.

The screenshot above shows examples of the plugins you can use on WordPress to boost your SEO.

Once you have set up your website, you can build and submit your sitemap to Google, Bing, Yahoo (via Bing) and other search engines to make it easier for them to find your site’s pages.

How can you optimize your site?

All that hard work of attracting customers to your website can be diminished if it performs poorly. Users are often only willing to give you seconds of their time before leaving a web page.

Here are just some of the checks you can make to help your website run smoothly.

  • check your images are web-friendly in size and number to avoid users having to wait a long time for the page to load
  • put in security protection to mitigate against hacks and malware which could slow down your site
  • ask if your host can add an SSL licence to your site to help protect your users if you are using forms and collecting personal data
  • identify WordPress plugins tested for monitoring or improving website performance
  • avoid lots of plugins that you don’t need which will have an adverse effect on loading times
  • find out how visitors with accessibility needs use your website and make it easier for them.

If you are not experienced in web development, you can talk with a professional web developer to help optimize your website’s performance.

Conclusion

Following these introductory 10 steps will help you highlight your business to new audiences and customers. By using WordPress, once you have your basic site you can add more features and content to expand your online presence.

Get started today by downloading WordPress.org and enjoy building your new site.

WordPress.org download

Thanks to @joelobo, @webcommsat, @mcdwayne, @harryjackson1221 and @bridgetwillard in the marketing team for working on this blog and to the businesses which helped test the top 10 list.