Collecting and Reporting Stats for Learn WordPress Discussion Groups

In the Americas friendly Community Team meeting today, a suggestion was made by @andreamiddleton:

it would be cool to see this level of reporting for workshops/discussion groups on Learn

This was inspired by the “transparency and clarity” of @jillbinder‘s reports on the Diversity Speakers Workshops.

Based on the conversation that continued, it seems the following are statistics that could be collected and reported upon:
* registrations: the number of people that sign-up to attend a discussion group
* attendees: the number of people that show-up to a discussion group

Some suggestions on other metrics to collect:
* date and time of a discussion group
* which workshop is being discussed

Are there additional metrics that we should collect?
Where should these metrics be reported?

#learn-wordpress

#stats, #workshops

The Learn WordPress discussion leader application is here!

After much brainstorming, reflection, and discussion we’ll be adding non-synchronous workshops to our inspirational and educational content in addition to the online meetups and events we’ve all grown accustomed to over the past several months. This exciting new effort is explained and discussed in greater detail in a recent post.

Later this month we’ll begin releasing new pre-recorded content aimed at educating and engaging both new and longterm WordPress users. While the content itself is sure to be fantastic, it’s just the starting point. Once the workshop content has been made available and community members and users have watched and learned from it, we will launch a discussion group, or series of discussion groups, to greater explore the content of each workshop.

Monday, I announced the application to submit Learn WordPress workshops. Yesterday, I announced the application to review submitted workshops. Today I’m excited to share with you the application to be a workshop discussion leader.

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#applications, #learn-wordpress, #workshops

The Learn WordPress workshop reviewer application is here!

After much brainstorming, reflection, and discussion we’ll be adding non-synchronous workshops to our inspirational and educational content in addition to the online meetups and events we’ve all grown accustomed to over the past several months. This exciting new effort is explained and discussed in greater detail in a recent post.

Later this month we’ll begin releasing new pre-recorded content aimed at educating and engaging both new and longterm WordPress users. While the content itself is sure to be fantastic, it’s just the starting point. Once the workshop content has been made available and community members and users have watched and learned from it, we will launch a discussion group, or series of discussion groups, to greater explore the content of each workshop.

Yesterday I announced the application to submit Learn WordPress workshops. Today I’m excited to share with you the application to be a workshop reviewer.

Workshop reviewers will review applications for workshops in their area of expertise and in the language(s) in which they’re fluent and make recommendations on whether the workshops should be created and shared in the Learn WordPress project.

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#community-team, #learn-roadmap, #workshops

The Learn WordPress workshop presenter application is here!

After much brainstorming, reflection, and discussion we’ll be adding non-synchronous workshops to our inspirational and educational content in addition to the online meetups and events we’ve all grown accustomed to over the past several months. This exciting new effort is explained and discussed in greater detail in a recent post.

Later this month we’ll begin releasing new pre-recorded content aimed at educating and engaging both new and longterm WordPress users. While the content itself is sure to be fantastic, it’s just the starting point. Once the workshop content has been made available and community members and users have watched and learned from it, we will launch a discussion group, or series of discussion groups, to greater explore the content of each workshop.

Continue reading

#learn-roadmap, #workshops

Last weekend we participated in the Grace Hopper…

Last weekend we participated in the Grace Hopper Women in Computing Conference‘s Open Source Day in Minneapolis. I, Alison Barrett, and Carolyn Sonnek attended as workshop teachers for the people who signed up for the WordPress section.

Alison led the group interested in working on how to contribute to coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. They went through the setup process with svn, and worked on a javascriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/. patch that was submitted on tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/.. I pinged Helen and Andrew Ozz to review the ticket so the participants could get an idea for how feedback gets delivered. After lunch, Alison’s group continued to learn about wp core (they mostly had js experience, no php).

Carolyn and I each led a small group in the morning that was focused on setting up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. and learning how to use WordPress (they mostly had no experience with it, coming from programming backgrounds rather than content management). After lunch our two groups combined and we taught them how themes work and how to build a child themeChild theme A Child Theme is a customized theme based upon a Parent Theme. It’s considered best practice to create a child theme if you want to modify the CSS of your theme. https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/advanced-topics/child-themes/..

At the end of the day we had to get up and show a demo of what our group had worked on, so we threw together some quick posts on a test site I had (because we couldn’t have multiple people contributing to a local install simultaneously) describing some of the activity, and one of the students’ child theme was used. It won’t be representative of the class after next week, but if anyone wants to see what was shown, you can see it here until October 16, 2013 (after which I’ll remove the link and it goes back to being a test site for me).

What we learned:

  • Most of the computer science majors/professionals we met had heard of WordPress but not used it, and didn’t work with PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php..
  • Because of our user/developer dual audience, it’s very difficult to ensure that a targeted workshop will reach the right audience without fairly strict pre-screening. We thought our group would be all people wanting to contribute to core, but 2/3 just wanted to learn how to use WP for the first time.
  • Having mamp and the most recent version of wp on a thumb drive is always very handy.
  • We could have jumped right into using WP if we hadn’t needed to dither with database connection errors etc in mamp/wamp for the first 20-30 minutes. That said, with this audience, they liked setting up the development environment, even if they weren’t going to do anything hardcore.
  • The workshop was the day after the conference proper ended, so some people had to leave after lunch because they were checking out of hotels, catching flights, etc. This is something we see when we do tack-ons after WordCamps also.
  • We really really need to kick it into gear with building curriculums and getting them online so we can start doing trainings of all stripes.

#conferences, #diversity, #grace-hopper, #training, #women, #workshops

WordPress will be participating in Grace Hopper Open…

WordPress will be participating in Grace Hopper Open Source Day 2013 at the Women in Computing Conference. It’s the same Saturday as WC Europe, so will need to see who’s heading to that before choosing a couple of (preferably women) mentors to go and oversee the workshop. We’ll be guiding some first-time contributors through a first project. Told Christie (co-chair of OSD) I wanted to wait to choose our project until we were into the next dev cycle so we could pick something relevant.

#conferences, #diversity, #grace-hopper, #women, #workshops

An early version of http learn wordpress org…

An early version of https://learn.wordpress.org/ is live, with a pre-registration form for the 1st women’s workshop. Props to Mel Choyce for design, George Stephanis for CSS, and Otto for themifying it.

#wordpress-org-site, #workshops

Q. When will the first women’s training be, and will these trainings be tied to WordCamps?

Lots of WordCamps (like Phoenix) usually do new-user trainings already, so I’m hoping you’ll take that into account.

— Andrea Middleton

A. March, and sometimes.

Like with WordCamps, we won’t announce the date and open registration until we nail down our venue, but we are shooting for the first weekend in March to run the pilot workshop. We’ll have a variety of training topics; we’re starting with troubleshooting but will eventually have one for new user setup as well. The idea is that these trainings can be run anytime.

If WordCamps want to incorporate them, great, but part of the reason for starting this training series was to make it possible to have trainings more frequently, and not attached to WordCamps. They can be attached, but in many cases it would be better to do a new user workshop a month or week before the WC, then focus on the fun stuff when the time comes.

Full-day workshops take a lot of effort, and while running them is rewarding, it’s always a bummer when the volunteers in those roles miss out on the regular WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. stuff in order to do it. Also, that would give the newbies a little bit of time to get used to WordPress and figure out what they really want to do with it before having to choose from the regular WC sessions (a frequent complaint from new-user-workshop-at-WC grads is that they don’t know enough yet to even choose sessions to attend after the workshop ends).

#training, #wordcamps, #workshops