Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

X-post: Community Team update – 01-08-2019

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Community Team update – 01-08-2019

Community Team Chat Agenda | Thursday, 1 August 2019

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 1 August 2019. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, August 1, 2019, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, August 1, 2019, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Highlighted P2 posts

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

WordCamps in 2018

This is a long overdue post to summarize the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. program for 2018. Thank you for your patience!

In 2018, over 35,000 WordPress enthusiasts came together at 143 different WordCamps to spend a day or three talking about WordPress, the free and open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. software that now powers 34% of the web!

WordCamps were held in 47 different countries in 2018, with events in 6 continents: Africa, Asia, Australia/Oceania, Europe, North America, and South America.

As you can see in the chart below, the number of WordCamps continues to steadily increase!

2018 2017 2016 2015
Total WordCamps 143 126 115 89
Total Registered Attendees 45,177 42,931 37,708 27,354
Unique Attendees 35,755 33,744 29,585 21,436
Total Organizers 1,395 1,061 815 600
Unique Organizers 1,342 1,017 797 583
Total Sessions 3,540 3,315 2,998 2,284
Total Speakers 3,479 3,265 2,965 2,376
Unique Speakers 2,634 2,459 2,284 1,762
Total Sponsors 2,650 2,478 2,312 1,672
Unique Sponsors 1,208 1,042 1,240 1,113

Notes on this report:

  • Data was gathered using the new reporting tools, so numbers may vary slightly from past years (which were gathered manually).
  • Added data on organizers (total and unique).
  • We are reporting on “total sessions”, rather than “unique sessions”. This is because determining unique sessions is subjective and therefore difficult to track.

Flagship WordCamps Data

  • WordCamp Europe tickets sold: 3,192 (includes 826 live stream tickets)
  • WordCamp US tickets sold: 4,071 (includes 2,260 live stream tickets)

Trends and Analysis

Average number of attendees per WordCamp = about 314. This is an continued increase from the past few years, most likely due to the increase in tickets sold for flagship events.

What else did the Community Team do in 2018?

Questions?

If there’s a figure above that you’d like to learn more about, or an observation you’d like to share based on the data here, please respond with a comment!

#report, #wordcamps

X-post: Community Team update – 18-07-2019

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Community Team update – 18-07-2019

Proposal: clearer WordCamp and WordPress chapter meetup logo guidelines

There have always been some casual recommendations  for how the WordPress logo should be incorporated into logos for WordCamps and WordPress chapter meetups, but we’ve never really had an open discussion about it. Following, you’ll find a proposal from Mel Choyce, Kjell Reigstad, Sarah Semark, Mark Uraine, and Tammie Lister for how the WordPress logo should be used for official events of the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project. Please read through the guidelines, and share your feedback and concerns in a comment on this post.

The following pages provide some important context on the WordPress logo, logotype, and the WordPress trademarks

You don’t need to use the WordPress logo.

While you are free to include the WordPress logo, or reference the W, in your logo, you don’t need to do so.

Example:

The WordPress logo has two variants.

If you do use the WordPress logo, know that it comes in two variants: W Mark and Simplified

W Mark
W Mark
Simplified
Simplified

Here are some examples of the variants in use:

Say “No!” to the Fauxgo.

If you are using the WordPress logo in your WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. logo, please make sure you are using the correct WordPress logo. 

The correct logo has a higher cap height, and rounded serifs:

Don’t change the logo.

Do not:

  • Remove the ring around the logo.
  • Cut or splice the logo.
  • Skew, distort, or add 3d effects to the logo.

Don’t use the Dashicons logo icon.

The Dashicons logo icon is specifically designed for use at smaller sizes; do not use it for your WordCamp logo. Instead, use the official logo files.

Color

Ensure that the logo has sufficient contrast.

Your logo should have sufficient color contrast to pass AA guidelines for text. You can check your design using a tool like Stark (for Sketch) or Logo Rank.

Design your logo in black & white first.

Designing your logo first in black & white is a good way to ensure that your logo will communicate effectively without color. We recommend designing your logo first in black and white, and then adding color near the end of the process.

RGB vs. CMYK

When designing your logo for digital devices, it’s good practice to use the RGB (red, green, blue) color model. When preparing your logo for print, use CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black). Screens differ from tangible paper products by emitting light instead of absorbing light. For this reason, RGB values work as additive colors for the screen and CMYK values work as subtractive colors for print.

Typography

Typography should be easily readable.

Your WordCamp name is one of the most important pieces of information, so make sure people can read it! Generally speaking, it’s best to use a relatively simple typeface without a lot of flourishes. This ensures that text is readable even at very small sizes, or when printed on a badge of which attendees may only catch a brief glimpse.

Avoid using Mrs Eaves.

Mrs Eaves is the WordPress brand typeface. It’s best to avoid using it for your WordCamp to avoid confusion with the WordPress brand.

Inclusion

Consider a range of users when designing.

When designing your logo, think about users who may have trouble reading or parsing your logo. Ensure your text is readable and color contrast is sufficient. It’s good practice to design your logo first in black and white, to ensure that those with color blindness are still able to understand your logo. (See also the color and typography sections.)

Ensure your logo is appropriate for all audiences.

A WordCamp is welcoming to everyone. Part of ensuring a safe, welcoming, and inclusive environment is ensuring that your logo (and other materials) are family-friendly. This means that logos should contain:

  • no sexually suggestive imagery
  • no profanity
  • nothing that would constitute implied or explicit exclusion of a group
  • no characterizations of a minority group in your area

Context and Formats

Ensure that your logo is recognizable in a wide range of contexts. 

WordCamp logos typically appear in many different places: on top of websites, on shirts and merchandise, stickers, in social media, signage, etc. Ensure that your logo is adaptable enough to be recognizable and readable in all of these contexts. Your logo should be flexible enough to work when it appears on a giant presentation screen, but also when it appears in a tiny social media icon.  

Provide the final logo in a variety of file formats for different uses.

The logo should be in a scalable vector format (Sketch, Figma, and Illustrator all produce vector graphics). The final file should also be available in the following formats:

  • .svg (preferred) or other open scalable graphics format (.eps)
  • .png (with a transparent background)

Provide the final logo in a variety of color formats.

To ensure maximum compatibility with different usage contexts, the recommended color formats for the logo are:

  • black & white
  • RGB (screen)
  • CMYK (print)
  • Pantone (print, optional)

Feedback?

Please share your thoughts on the proposed guidelines and how best to share them moving forward. 

#design, #meetups-2, #proposal, #wordcamps

Proposal to update the Meetup Organiser Handbook

In light of recent news, I would like to suggest an update to the MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Organiser Handbook.

At the moment the page on Meetup program basics has a small paragraph under the good faith rules about the GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples. and how it relates to meetups and meetup organisers.

On the other hand, the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organiser handbook has an entire page dedicated to the requirements of being a WordCamp organiser, with a specific section on the GPL. The language on this page is also stronger and more clearly defines what we require from a WordCamp organiser, regarding the GPL.

As we don’t want to duplicate pages across handbooks, I’d like to propose that we update the Meetup program basics page so that the requirements for meetup organisers and the GPL is clearer and more explicit.

Additionally, we may want to also review the Meetup orientation script, to include these updated requirements, that a prospective organiser agrees to.

Comments and suggestions are welcome, I’ll leave comments open for 2 weeks.

Numbers in the Netherlands

At the start of 2017, the decision was made to switch from a single national WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. in the Netherlands to local city-based WordCamps. This was in line with the same decision having been made in a number of other countries before that. @chanthaboune provided some additional context around this decision at the time.

The last time we had a public discussion about this was just over a year ago and after recent in-person discussions at WordCamp Europe in Berlin, now is a good time to revisit things in a public forum — and now with data!

The Numbers

Below is some hard data on the number of attendees, organisers, speakers, and sponsors taking part in local WordCamps over the past 6 years which the team may find interesting and could help inform the next round of discussion.

Here is the raw data from each event:

WordCamp Date Tickets sold Organisers Speakers Sponsors
WCNL 2014 10-11 May 235 4 22 12
WCNL 2015 26-27 September 268 5 16 5
WCNL 2016 14-16 October 461 7 38 21
Nijmegen 2017 1-2 September 270 7 22 18
Utrecht 2017 25-26 November 250 6 22 32
Noord Nederland 2018 9-10 February 113 5 14 9
Rotterdam 2018 23-24 March 218 5 18 21
Nijmegen 2018 30 August – 1 September 298 7 37 21
Utrecht 2018 27-28 October 175 5 19 28
Rotterdam 2019 12-13 April 181 7 18 31

And here are a few calculations from that data:

Attendees

Total number of attendees at WCNL 2014-2016 (uniques): 716
Total number of attendees at local camps from 2017-present: 1,351
Total number of attendees at local camps from 2017-present (uniques): 910
Number of people who attended local camps from 2017-present, but not WCNL (uniques): 696
Total increase in the number of attendees at local camps from 2017-present: 194
Number of people who attended more than one WordCamp in the Netherlands from 2017-present: 441 (48%)
Number of people who attended WordCamps in more than one city in the Netherlands from 2017-present: 243 (26.7%)

Organisers

Total number of organisers for WCNL 2014-2016 (uniques): 8
Total number of organisers for local camps from 2017-present: 42
Total number of organisers for local camps from 2017-present (uniques): 28
Number of organisers local camps from 2017-present, but not WCNL (uniques): 24
Total increase in the number of organisers for local camps from 2017-present: 20
Number of people who organised multiple local camps from 2017-present (all in the same city): 14 (50%)

Speakers

Total number of speakers at WCNL 2014-2016 (uniques): 60
Total number of speakers at local camps from 2017-present: 151
Total number of speakers at local camps from 2017-present (uniques): 108
Number of speakers at local camps from 2017-present, but not WCNL (uniques): 88
Total increase in the number of speakers at local camps from 2017-present: 48
Number of people who spoke at more than one local camp from 2017-present: 43 (40%)
Number of people who spoke at local camps in more than one city from 2017-present: 30 (27.8%)

Sponsors

Total number of sponsors for WCNL 2014-2016 (uniques): 18
Total number of sponsors for local camps from 2017-present: 108
Total number of sponsors for local camps from 2017-present (uniques): 66
Number of sponsors for local camps from 2017-present, but not WCNL (uniques): 59
Total increase in the number of sponsors for local camps from 2017-present: 48
Number of companies that sponsored more than one local camp from 2017-present: 42 (64%)
Number of companies that sponsored local camps in more than one city from 2017-present: 22 (33.3%)

These numbers seem to indicate clear and significant growth in the number of people participating in the Dutch WordPress community in all roles. Huge kudos to community organizers in the Netherlands! This kind of growth is wonderfully inspiring.

The number of new attendees, organisers, speakers, and sponsors who have been welcomed into local WordCamps, given a platform to share their knowledge as speakers, and given leadership opportunities in their work as organizers… well, it’s all very exciting.

Additional Context

Numbers aren’t everything, however, and there are a few things that should be taken into account when interpreting the data here.

Firstly, had the decision not been made to switch to local WordCamps, the WCNL team was planning on increasing their number of organisers to 16 for the 2017 event, with an aim to host 600 attendees (up from 461 in 2016). Given that the decision to switch was made, this planned WCNL 2017 did not happen.

Secondly, the WordPress dashboard events widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. was launched in 2017 which had a generally positive effect on attendees at both meetups and WordCamps around the world. We don’t have any data on how many people attended events because of the widget, but it is something worth taking into account. This would likely have led to an increase in attendees no matter what events had taken place in 2017 (and onwards).

Next Steps

The plan since 2017 was always to enter into talks about reintroducing WCNL after a few years of local WordCamps. With that in mind, the next steps here are:

  • Continue with local WordCamps in the Netherlands but also reintroduce an annual WCNL to complement the local events.
  • Given the scope of WCNL, initiate a discussion around some strategies local camps might try in the future – for example, whether organizing smaller camps or subject-matter-focussed camps will help local communities maintain the growth they’ve achieved and continue to grow sustainably.

Discussions are ongoing, and it’ll be really interesting to see what happens next.

Feedback

So over to you – what do you take away from the numbers provided above? Let us know in the comments!

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Discussion: what to do in case of irreconcilable differences

Community team deputies are currently in discussion with a meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizer who is distributing a WordPress derivative that is not 100% GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples.. We often talk to future organizers about changing licenses for their products during the vetting process. In this case, it only came to the team’s attention after the orientation and setting up the group.

As part of the Good Faith Rules, it’s stated that to organize meetup events in official chapter groups, you are expected to embrace the WordPress license. Anyone who wants to use a different license can do so, just not as part of our official program.

Difficult choices

This case is unusual because the meetup group in question was created by the global community team, on the WordPress chapter from the beginning. The group has met only once so far, and has less than 50 members.

Two options present themselves: the team can

  1. remove this person from their role as meetup organizer of the group and email all members of the group, inviting a new organizer to step forward, or 
  2. remove the group from the WordPress chapter program (after emailing the members to explain what’s about to happen), leaving the organizer as a leader of the group, simply removing the official WordPress endorsement. 

Both options have disadvantages, so I think it’s important for the team to discuss the best way forward.

Option 1: If the group started as part of the chapter program and was promoted through the events widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user., it seems like the group should continue following the expectations of the chapter program. Removing the organizer from their role (if they decline to meet expectations) and inviting a new organizer to step forward might be confusing for group members, but would clearly communicate the importance of the 4 freedoms inside WordPress. People who joined because this is an official meetup, will stay in an official meetup. On the other hand, since the group is so new, we might be inviting people to take a leadership position before they’ve gotten to know the WordPress project well enough to make an educated decision.

Option 2: This option leaves the organizer in charge of a group that was created under the WordPress umbrella. Removing the WordPress chapter status from the current group could result in a “bait and switch” for people who joined the group because they learned about it on their WordPress dashboard. Even though we’d message everyone about the change, meetup.com emails aren’t read very consistently. It’s probably less destabilizing for the group, but might be seen as weaker support for the rights of the WordPress user. This would also leave the city with no chapter meetup, but of course another local WordPress enthusiast could apply to organize one.

Discuss!

I hope neither of these options are necessary, and that the organizer decides to embrace the WordPress license after all. Regardless, I’d love to know the team’s thoughts on these two options, because someday this question will come up again, and I’d like to be ready.

Please share your feedback in a comment on this post!

#gpl