Community Team Chat Agenda | July 2 2020

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 02 July 2020. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, July 02, 2020, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, July 02, 2020, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

  • Diverse Speaker Workshops Report – June 2020 – Jill Binder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/22/diverse-speaker-workshops-report-june-2020/
  • Tuesday Trainings: Encouraging Diversity in Meetups and WordCamps – Angela Jin – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/23/tuesday-trainings-encouraging-diversity-in-meetups-and-wordcamps/
  • Video and YouTube Workflow for Online WordCamps: Request for Feedback posted by Hari Shanker R. – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/24/video-and-youtube-workflow-for-online-wordcamps-request-for-feedback/
  • 2020 WordCamps stalled in pre-planning, update by Cami Kaos – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/26/2020-wordcamps-stalled-in-pre-planning/
  • Timi posted a Proposal: Dedicated communication place for deputies – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/29/proposal-dedicated-communication-place-for-deputies/
  • Estela posted an update on: Exploration of a new classification for user documentation – https://make.wordpress.org/docs/2020/06/22/exploration-of-a-new-classification-for-user-documentation/
  • Another edition of Tuesday Trainings by Evarlese – Tuesday Trainings: Tips for managing an online meetup – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/06/30/tuesday-trainings-tips-for-managing-an-online-meetup/

Highlighted P2 posts

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#deputy-chat, #meeting-agenda, #team-chat

Tuesday Trainings: Tips for managing an online meetup

Even though many of our contributions to the WordPress community take place online, shifting our meetups to a virtual format brings its own fair share of changes, challenges, and adaptations. For many of us, connecting virtually may be a new experience full of new tools and new ways of communicating.

As part of our Tuesday Training series, we’re sharing some tips and tricks to help MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers create an accessible and friendly place when connecting with their community online. For additional resources, we also highly recommend checking out the Virtual Events Handbook, as well.

Password protect and manage who can get in.

First things first: part of creating a community space is ensuring that the space is safe and inclusive for everyone. Many of us are using Zoom for our meetups, though any virtual meeting tool may bring with it its own risks and challenges for keeping our virtual spaces in line with the expectations of our Online Code of Conduct.

To help protect fellow organizers and participants, check out the Zoom security settings page. You may want to:

  • Keep the hangout link private until 15 minutes or so prior to the beginning of your event.
  • Password protect or require approval for admittance. This ensures that everyone joining is part of the community, rather than spammers taking advantage of a situation.
  • Set expectations in your meetup invite so that attendees know what to expect in regard to their admission. 

Leave space for a check-in.

One of the best parts of meeting in person is the networking and connections that come about from being in a shared space with a shared interest. Just because we’re meeting virtually, that doesn’t mean we have to lose that experience!

When planning for your meetup, aim to leave some time at the beginning and the end for a check-in with folks. You can even offer to meet up a few minutes – 15 to 30 minutes – before the event itself starts so that those interested have time for a networking or social opportunity. Leaving the opportunity for some free-form conversation can help to strengthen and maintain our bonds, even if we’re meeting from our respective living rooms.

Share expectations at the beginning. 

Just as we would introduce new members to expectations and “how things work” at the beginning of an in-person meetup, the same applies to online meetings, too. In fact, it may be even more applicable as your events become more accessible to a wider-variety of people who may or may not have experience with the WordPress community.

Before diving into your presentation, consider taking a few moments to introduce yourself, the group, the code of conduct, and what will be expected during the night’s event. In particular, it can be useful to let attendees know if there will be breakout sessions, activities, or exercises, so they can prepare themselves. 

Leverage tools provided by the software you’re using.

It can feel less personal to participate and present to a virtual audience. It’s hard to replace that in-person feedback that comes from eye contact, body language, and quick chats after your talk. However, when planning out your meetup, look for ways in which you can make your hangout interactive.

For example, Zoom has features like breakout rooms (for small group conversations), surveys, and Q&As for some real-time contributions from participants. Likewise, rather than relying on chat for participants to ask questions, welcome video questions beforehand or invite participants to unmute and ask their questions out loud. If you want to get really creative, you can explore setting up games in Kahoot!, engaging attendees in sli.do, and exploring YouTube Live comments for real-time participation.

Be respectful of time – and distractions.

Doing things online can come with unexpected challenges. Your bandwidth suddenly drops. Another call goes over time. Partners and kids forget about that meeting you told them about. In other words, life happens – and at home, we may have even fewer boundaries between our WordPress selves and home selves.

As an organizer, keep this in mind when planning your meeting. If you’re doing breakout rooms, maybe it’s best to stick with three participants, rather than a one-on-one check-in, so there’s a buffer if someone has to suddenly drop offline. Allow for multiple avenues of participation, such as video, chat, or submitting questions prior to the event. Understand that folks might disappear or come in and out at times, and set any expectations accordingly. 

Don’t underestimate the power of a social hangout.

If in doubt, don’t overthink it. If you’re planning a meetup and no clear topic presents itself, consider simply hosting a “Coffee Break” or social hour. It’s also a great time to experiment! Just having an opportunity to casually check-in with one another, chat, and, quite literally, hang out can help maintain and boost the connections between your members – even while we can’t see each other in person.

Above all, it can help to see online meetups as an opportunity. Those who might not normally be able to attend may have more flexibility without the commute to your meetup space. With new members, you may see new volunteers to speak, or even organize, events in the future. By creating a safe space where members can continue to learn, bond, and connect with one another, we can continue to keep our local communities strong!

Looking for more great Trainings?

@jillbinder has some great content coming up soon!

Meetups: Would you like to have more diverse representation in the speakers at your online (and when it’s available again, in-person) meetup events? On July 18, we will teach you how to facilitate the workshop that gives your underrepresented community members the motivation, confidence, and tools we need to start: tiny.cc/wpdiversity 

#tuesdaytrainings

X-post: Exploration of a new classification for user documentation

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/docs: Comment on Exploration of a new classification for user documentation

Proposal: Dedicated communication place for deputies

For some time I’ve personally have felt that deputies would need another place than #community-team SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel to discuss some topics. Mary’s proposal about monthly virtual calls is a great one to create a place for deputies to see each other and share how they are, though it has a slightly different function than I’m proposing here.

To keep it short, my few arguments why deputies would need dedicated channel:

1) We have 51 active deputies and the #community-team channel has over 1 500 members

2) During exceptional situations, like resent COVID-19 response and things caused by that, deputies needed to communicate realtime a lot while working with fast actions to help organisers. And in other hand, deputies stepping in to help with the response work needed to get (at that point) internal instructions. Sharing and creating internal instructions on a channel that has over 1 500 members, means that community members will see an incomplete and in some cases information that is subject to change. This means that #community-team channel is not space place for deputies to draft some posts, changes and guidelines in urgent or controversial situations.

3) Currently, some discussion that is internal for deputies for a reason or another (like how to respond in sudden situations/cases, how to handle this thing we haven’t faced before or issues that are delicate) are hepping in small(ish) deputy DM groups. For transparency this is bad.

4) The dedicated channel could encourage deputies to ask help when they need it during their work.

This is why I’m proposing: creating a new private channel for active deputies. Active deputies would be defined based on this deputy sheet we have.

Yes, the private channel is somewhat against the transparency we as a team and as a project in general cherish. At the same time, it should be remembered that some discussions that could involve all deputies happen in smaller DM groups. Creating a private channel for all deputies would hopefully reduce the need for that kind of DM groups and add transparency amongst deputies.

Also, the CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team has a private channel for some discussions mainly related to releasing new versions, because it’s more convenient to have a smaller channel instead of trying to have the discussion in the public channel where a lot of conversation happens. (Someone who is more familiar with the Core team can correct me if I’m wrong).

And the last argument in favour of the private channel is that we are already good in directing discussion from Slack to P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. when needed, so why we wouldn’t be good on moving some discussion from a private channel to public #community-team if the topic is something that can be discussed publicly.

When pitching this idea to some members of our deputy team, it got objections and a counter-proposal of creating new public channel for this purpose.

Please leave your feedback on the topic and particularly in the following questions:

  1. Should deputies have another place than the #community-team channel to discuss among themselves if needed?
  2. If deputies should have a dedicated channel, should it be private or public?

Leave your feedback on 2020-07-31 latest.

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

2020 WordCamps stalled in pre-planning

In a normal year we see a number of events that stall in the pre-planning phase and just kind of fizzle out. The number of those events stuck in pre-planning seem higher than ever due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Ask: Deputies will you please update this list of events in pre-planning that have been stalled long enough to require us to check in on their plans to to give us a better idea of which events are cancelled and which will be shifting to an online only event?

Some of these events may already have discussed cancelling or moving online and we’ve had conversations with them but haven’t received their final decision. Some of them may just not have been updated in Central.WordCamp.org. Either way let’s make sure we have the most up to date information so we have an accurate look at what could be coming in the next 6 months.

Through the end of the weekend please select events with which you have already worked and been in contact. After we’ve all had a chance to select events we’ve worked with we can divided up the remainder to reach out to starting Monday.

If you’re an organizer whose event has been stalled in preplanning, please feel free to update us on the status of your event.

The linked document should be viewable by everyone with the link and several deputies have already been granted access. If you require access please let me know in the comments.

Thanks so much!

#wordcamps #community-management #deputies

Video and YouTube Workflow for Online WordCamps: Request for Feedback

Since many WordCamps are moving online, the Community team is exploring different options on how best to support WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers in publishing their videos online. Recent online WordCamps have successfully used YouTube to live stream their events, so the Community team is working on setting up a streamlined process for publishing WordCamp videos in WordPress.tv and YouTube. 

We would like to hear your feedback on our existing workflow and ask you to identify where we should improve or modify the current process.

Challenges

The Community team originally considered using the official WordPress YouTube channel (youtube.com/wordpress) for live streaming WordCamps. However, the following concerns were identified:  

  1. Since this channel has relatively few administrators, adding local community members as WordCamp chat moderators could take a long time for approval.  
  2. Online WordCamps work closely with vendors (either verified vendors recommended by the Community Team, or local vendors that are identified by WordCamp organizers). The WordPress YouTube channel is the official channel of the WordPress project. Sharing administrator access to a large group of people (including third party vendors) comes with a lot of risks, including copyright takedown, that will result in the loss of thousands of hours of videos.  

Current Approach

WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. has its own legacy YouTube channel with live-streaming support. To address the challenges mentioned above, we currently expect that all upcoming online WordCamps will use the WordCamp Central YouTube channel for live streaming their events, as the risks involved here are a lot lower when compared to the official WordPress YouTube account. Here’s the existing workflow that we have in place for online WordCamps: 

  • Once organizers have confirmed their vendor, and after the WordCamp is scheduled, Community Team deputies will grant the vendor access to the WordCamp Central YouTube channel (We will typically revoke vendor access to the channel once the event concludes).
  • Community deputies will provide moderator access to select members from the WordCamp organizing team for chat moderation, prior to the event (Access will be revoked as soon as the event concludes).
  • WordCamp organizers will work closely with the vendor to stream the event.
  • Once the event concludes, live-streamed videos from the WordCamp central channel will be unlisted. Attendees can re-watch the stream by visiting the WordCamp website. 
  • The vendor will then edit the individual session videos and upload them to WordPress.tv
  • The WordPress.tv team is currently working on an automated way of cross-posting the videos to the WordPress YouTube channel. When this is fully implemented, videos will be available both in the official WordPress YouTube channel, as well as on WordPress.tv, so that they will have a better reach. 

Potential Alternate Solution

The WordPress Foundation has now been approved for a G-Suite for Non-Profits account. This account can be used for the @wordcamp.org domain as well. This would allow the Community team  to provide G-Suite access to each individual WordCamp, so that they can make use of the bundled YouTube account to stream their event in their own channel. Using the G-Suite for Non-Profit account for YouTube would help us bypass the monetization requirement, thus helping each WordCamp to have their own individual YouTube channel for live streaming the events. 

While G-Suite powered YouTube channels can be used for live streaming events, WordCamp organizers will not be able to publish finalized individual session videos in their channel, if they want these videos to be published in the official WordPress YouTube channel. This is because individual YouTube videos can only be uploaded once on the platform

.Alternatively, WordCamps can potentially set up their own YouTube accounts for live streaming. However, YouTube has set up some barriers to embedding live streams on web pages unless the account is monetized, which prevents camps from using their accounts for live streaming. 

Note: This monetization requirement is fairly new, so events such as WordCamp Europe with long-established YouTube accounts did not face this problem.

Request for Feedback

What are your thoughts on the existing workflow for publishing WordCamp videos? Are there any shortcomings with this approach? Can you suggest any improvements to this process? 

Do you think that providing G-Suite accounts to individual WordCamps would be beneficial? Are you aware of any reasons why this may (or may not) work? 

We would like to hear from you all! Please share your suggestions as comments to this post by July 3rd, 2020 (Friday). 

+make.wordpress.org/tv/

The following people his helped in publishing this post: @andreamiddleton @angelasjin @camikaos @carike @courtneypk @casiepa @megabyterose @nukaga @shinichin @tacoverdo

Tuesday Trainings: Encouraging Diversity in Meetups and WordCamps

For this #trainingtuesday, I’m joined by @alliennimmons, @jillbinder, @khleomix, and @mariaojob in a panel discussion on how we can better encourage and support diversity in Meetups and WordCamps, and in the broader WordPress community. Watch and learn with us, and continue the important conversation on diversity and inclusion in WordPress!

Participants in this panel also referenced a few resources that they hope you will find useful when it comes to thinking about and supporting diversity in your WordPress community.

Transcript available here.

Looking for more great Trainings?

@jillbinder has some great content coming up soon!

Meetups: Would you like to have more diverse representation in the speakers at your online (and when it’s available again, in-person) meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. events? On July 18, we will teach you how to facilitate the workshop that gives your underrepresented community members the motivation, confidence, and tools we need to start: tiny.cc/wpdiversity 

#community-management, #diversity, #tuesdaytrainings

Diverse Speaker Workshops Report – June 2020

The Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) normally trains WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers how to hold their own Diverse Speaker workshop in order to increase how many speaker applications they get from people from marginalized and underrepresented groups.

During the pandemic, the team is delivering the workshop to the global WordPress community online ourselves.

Each month, we are reporting at the tag #DiverseSpeakerWorkshopsReports how these workshops are going.

June’s events consisted of a three-part workshop, one hour each day, three days in a row, followed by two Zoom group coaching sessions the following week.

Number who attended: 6
From number of cities: 5
From number of countries: 4 (Canada, India, UK, US)

Number who attended all 3 sessions: 1
Number who attended 2 sessions: 2

Increase in public speaking confidence after taking a workshop: 20%

July workshops & group coaching

The dates and sign-up link for July will be announced soon. Please comment here or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” @jillbinder on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. with your interest.

#diversespeakerworkshopsreports, #wpdiversity

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!