I need your help! Let’s gather posts of this blog to be added to the Handbooks!

Hello community members 🙂

One of the things that we’re planing to work on during the Contributor Day of WordCamp Europe 2019 is to add to the WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. Organizer or MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Organizer Handbook those posts that have been published in this site (we call it the: make/community P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/.) in the last couple of years that haven’t been added to the handbook yet.

In order to save some time for the Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/., we’d like to start gathering all those posts that would be useful to be added to existing or new pages of any of our handbooks.

I’ll be listing some links, please feel free to add any others that you find:

  • https://make.wordpress.org/community/2019/05/31/the-4-gets-in-wordpress-community-organizing/
  • https://make.wordpress.org/community/2019/05/17/organizer-best-practices-make-the-most-of-your-feedback/

Thanks! 😀

Community Team Chat Agenda | Thursday, 6 June 2019

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 6 June 2019. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, June 6, 2019, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, June 6, 2019, 20:00 UTC

Deputy check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

Highlighted P2 posts

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#agenda

Kids Event Working Group Chat Agenda | Thursday 13 June 2019

Our next weekly Kids Events Working Group chat is happening Thursday, 13 June 2019 at 2000 UTC/ 4pm EST. This chat will occur in the Make WordPress Community-Team Slackchannel.

Agenda

  1. Updates from volunteers.
  2. Discuss remaining research needs.
  3. Discuss next steps.

Come and discuss how you can be involved. We need people to:

  • Research – laws surrounding minors at events globally
  • Writing – arts and crafts documentation, WordPress basics documentation, Parental Resources Documents
  • Editing – grammar, spell check, and general flow proof readers/editors

Everyone is welcome. Please attend even if you are not sure how to participate.

If for any reason you can not attend the meeting live but still want to be involved please comment on the post to introduce yourself. Share a bit about your WP background and what area you want to help with.

Please leave a comment of anything else that should be added to the agenda for discussion.

#kids-events

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

The 4 “Gets” in WordPress Community Organizing

People all over the world want to organize WordPress community events, which is humbling and exciting. This comes with a lot of responsibility for the global community team, which carefully reviews all applications and vets all applicants, before moving forward with them. Part of the global community team’s process when vetting applications is to find out what motivates aspiring WordPress leaders to sign up for a lot of hard (but fun!) work — to ensure that the applicant’s goals fit well with the team’s goals.

The  community organizer handbooks have lots of public information about how we suggest people achieve these goals (what the organizers will “give”), but doesn’t outline very clearly what our volunteers can reasonably expect in return for their work (what the organizers will “get”). While everyone knows that WordPress is made possible through volunteer time, that doesn’t mean there is no reciprocity — for everything that someone gives, there are things that they also receive.

In this post, I’d like to start a conversation about how we can better clarify expectations for new and experienced contributors in our group. Here’s my first attempt at explicitly outlining our volunteers’ main “get”s.

What WordPress community organizers get (for all their hard work)

  1. Impact. WordPress community events are promoted by the WordPress project and tap into resources that other tech events don’t have — like being marketed on the WordPress dashboard. WordPress community event organizers choose the topics that are shared at monthly and annual events,  and who will lead those conversations. Your choices affect who will feel comfortable in the spaces where people connect. WordPress events change lives, and your choices define what kind of change might happen, and for whom.
  2. Growth. Volunteers are given opportunities based mainly on their interests, not their experience. WordPress community organizers aren’t required to have organized an event, or have managed a team, before taking on a leadership role in their local communities. WordPress community event organizers have the opportunity to develop a broad array of skills: leadership, communications, design, logistics, marketing, fundraising, management… the list goes on. Every one of these skills can create opportunities in someone’s professional career or personal life.
  3. Training/Support. Learning to organize WordPress community events is a very open process, and unusually short compared to many other global volunteer programs. All of our training, documentation, best practices, and tools are produced by experienced organizers. And when organizers run into problems they don’t know how to handle, there is a team of experienced helpers available, practically all the time.
  4. Protection. Back before 2011, WordPress community organizers took on a lot of risk in their work — more than any other WordPress contributor. Event organizers experienced financial loss, inquiries from tax authorities, lawsuits, and other life-damaging problems as a result of unexpected things happening at/due to their events. Our current fiscal & logistical infrastructure shields our volunteers from financial and legal risks they might suffer when organizing WordPress community events.

Those are some pretty great things you can expect when joining this courageous team of leaders! But there are things that no one gets, or that only come with time or experience — and it’s important to call those out too.

What WordPress community organizers don’t get (right away, and sometimes ever)

  1. Complete autonomy. Local organizers make a lot of powerful choices when creating events and building community. However, organizers aren’t free to pick and choose which meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. or WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. program expectations they follow through on. If you accept the WordPress community organizer role despite disagreeing with some parts of the program, you’re still expected to do the things that everyone is asked to do — they’re part of the job.
  2. Commit-level access. WordPress community organizers are full of bright ideas, which is a lot of what makes this project so great. Not every bright idea meshes well with WordPress community values or works on a global scale, though. The WordPress community programs — just like the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project as a whole — are open source, but they’re not “open commit.” Even if you are certain that your idea is a good one, it still might not work at a WordPress chapter meetup or WordCamp. By the way, there is a way to earn “commit-level access” on the community team — and it starts with becoming a community deputy.
  3. And other things.  There are other things, too, but those all come up in orientations and in our handbook (they’re outlined in the 5 Good Faith Rules for meetups, and Should You Be An Organizer? and Representing WordPress docs in the WordCamp organizer handbook). To summarize, it’s best not to try to establish a leadership position in WordPress for self-serving purposes, such as trying to make a profit off the local group or to promote your business or friends’ companies over other local businesses. Likewise, if your leadership approach includes hateful or very controlling behavior, this organization probably won’t be a good fit for you.

Share your thoughts

What do you think about this list of “get”s and “don’t get”s — does this help clarify the kind of personal return that contributors can reasonably expect for the time and attention they invest in our programs? What did you expect you’d get out of participating as a WordPress community organizer, and what did you actually get?

#community-expectations

Who wants to test the new WordCamp blocks?

The WordCamp.org GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ blocks that were discussed and designed some time back are now ready for betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. testing!

Please note that currently Speaker, Session, Organizer and Sponsor blocks are available for testing. Development work on the schedule blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. is in progress, and will hopefully be available for testing in a month or so.

Beta testers, please report issues and bugs on Meta Trac or in the #meta-wordcamp channel on WordPress Slack.

Leave a comment on this post if you’re interested in testing these new tools on your WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. site. Thanks in advance for helping to improve our tools via testing and bug reports!

#blocks, #wordcamp-org

Improving Speaker Section of Handbook – Slight Addition Suggestion

It would be amazing to have a line on this page of the handbook or the slides deck page that stated there can be no barriers to additional supplemental content. A lot of speakers post a link to their slides (handouts, etc) and this is amazing. However, having a speaker require a newsletter signup seems against most guidelines (just not explicitly written). It is hard to stop that speaker at a meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. when they are the only one. Any thoughts?

Please comment on thoughts and concerns. I don’t mind helping to write this either. Just wanted to put it out there since I experienced it recently and it was rather uncomfortable.

Improving Deputy Training – Volunteers Needed!

Action required: If you’re an existing deputy and would like to help out with improving the deputy training materials, please read on and comment at the end.

One of the goals that has been set for the Deputy Program for this year is to improve our training materials:

Our current training process takes the form of an online course – this works well for disseminating information and making sure that new deputies have all the information they need. The issue is that it takes a long time to go through the answers submitted by each new deputy to make sure they understood everything correctly. It feels like the best way to improve the deputy training course is to edit all the quizzes to be multiple choice questions (so that they can be graded automatically and a 100% pass is required to move on to the next one), but then have a single quiz at the end that includes a number of long-form questions that require longer answers. This means that grading the course would only require manually doing it for a single quiz for each deputy – this would drastically cut down the time it would take to check these answers.

With that goal in mind, I have done an audit of the questions we ask in the deputy training course, the results of which you can see here. As a high-level summary, I noted the following info:

  • The training course consists of 21 lessons/quizzes.
  • There are 70 questions in total across all of the quizzes.
  • Only 20 of those questions can be auto-graded (i.e. they are mlutiple choice questions).
  • The other 50 questions are all open-ended and need to be manually checked in order to be graded.

With that in mind, the next step here is to update the quizzes to create new questions in each one that can be auto-graded. The original content was written predominantly by @andreamiddleton and it is still incredibly valuable, so we don’t want to edit that anywhere at this stage (unless you find areas where things need to be updated as our practices have changed).

As a general goal, it would be great to have 3-6 multiple choice questions for each lesson and then a set of 5-10 long-form questions for the final quiz that help to show how well folks understand the content. We should be able to use some of the existing long-form questions for that and only write a few more if required.

If you are an existing deputy and would like to help with this, please comment on this post to let me know that you’re keen and we can start working on it.

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Recap of the Kids Event Working Group Checkin Chat | Thursday 23 May 2019

Attending: @sunsand187 @michelebutcherjones @ericka_barboza @camikaos

Start: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C037W5S7X/p1558641612059600

We Covered

  1. Updates from volunteers.
  2. Discuss June and July Goals
  3. Discuss next steps.

Updates from Volunteers

Michele: Still working on the Illinois papers, getting CPR/1A recertification, and compiling all my info to Sandy.

Sandy: Just finished the Missouri research for WCUS and any other Missouri camp and will get that documented this week

Ericka:

I was working for KidsCamp in the next WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. San Jose Costa Rica, we will have three Workshops.
Robotics workshop, STEAM workshop and Create my first blog on WordPress.comWordPress.com An online implementation of WordPress code that lets you immediately access a new WordPress environment to publish your content. WordPress.com is a private company owned by Automattic that hosts the largest multisite in the world. This is arguably the best place to start blogging if you have never touched WordPress before. https://wordpress.com/

June Goal: Research Sprint

We should work as team to discover the laws that different states/countries have surrounding hosting one day kids events. As well as, the laws surrounding waivers for kids events as well.

This will help expedite camp planning for all camps around the world (eventually).

An example would be that in Florida a very specific liability waiver is needed with specific language. Thank you to @RianKinney, Esq. for digging that up for us.

While that specific waiver is needed for Florida, the need for a waiver could be looked at as an overarching need for ALL camps with kids programs. It would be good for us all to take a region near us so that we can dive into what those laws look like and formulate a general plan that would cover the bulk of those laws. This could include the need for background checks, waivers, first aid certifications, etc.

Here is a spreadsheet for all of our findings:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1xky1PbUQD99IZj9wpgmPdfkCqXBrpDveArc9nFpBZpY/edit?usp=sharing

If you want to help here please sign up on the second tab to take a region.

Project Management Information

So I know a lot of people expressed interest but not everyone made it to todays meeting. I am sure more people will be getting involved over time. I did create a TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. Board so that we have some jumping off points for anyone to just dive in and start on micro pieces.

https://trello.com/invite/b/GryYJ7P9/0a44a78f320c0eb04013fa193b0663ce/wordpress-kids-events-planning

End: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C037W5S7X/p1557432914349500

Next Actions

  1. @sunsand187 Will Document process for a new camp to vet state laws and requirements. And create the handbook structure. As well as, create spreadsheet.
  2. Team, Look over Trello and this post to stay up to date and provide feedback. https://trello.com/invite/b/GryYJ7P9/0a44a78f320c0eb04013fa193b0663ce/wordpress-kids-events-planning
  3. @michelebutcher-jones is working on state laws for Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and MIssouri
  4. Ericka is working on creating a Manual for the creation of the Blog on wordpress.com, with images, to give to the kids-parents of KidsCamp.

Next Meeting is Thursday, 13 June 2019, 2000 UTC/ 4pm EST. This chat will occur in the Make WordPress Community-Team SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel.

#kids-events