WordPress 5.6 ‘Simone’ Retrospective

Having fully celebrated the release of 5.6, but before turning focus our to 5.7 it would be so helpful to this and future squads, if all those involved in contributing could take a moment to share their thoughts about the process of the release.

Taking the pulse in the form of a retrospective will help uncover things that the WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team find valuable to keep doing in future releases because they were a positive experience and moved the project forward in the way we need. It will also help identify areas that were not helpful in fulfilling our goals or were not positive for people participating. So we value all feedback to help us continue to iterate.

To participate in this retro, please take a few moments to fill in this form. It is not anonymous, but your email address will not be kept or used for any other purpose than to discourage trolling.

Thank you one and all for your contribution to this release, and thanks in advance for taking the time to help make future releases even better. Expect the consolidated results to be published early in 2021.

If you prefer, here’s a link to the form embedded below.

(Props to @audrasjb for copy edit suggestions).

#5-6, #retrospective

Dev Chat Summary: December 9 2020

Hello! Here’s what happened in the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. dev chat on Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 05:00 UTC and Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 20:00 UTC.

05:00 UTC core dev chat

@thewebprincess facilitated the meeting and took notes. Find the full Slack archive here.

20:00 UTC core dev chat

@francina & @johnbillion facilitated the meeting and @laurora took notes. The full Slack archive can be viewed here.

Announcements

WordPress 5.6 aka “Simone” was released yesterday (8 December 2020). The release squad was entirely made of people identifying as women and non-binary folx. You can read more about the release in this blog post. At the time of the meeting, @helen shared that it’s already exceeded 3 million downloads.

The annual State of the WordState of the Word This is the annual report given by Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress at WordCamp US. It looks at what we’ve done, what we’re doing, and the future of WordPress. https://wordpress.tv/tag/state-of-the-word/. will be taking place Thursday 17 December at 1600 UTC. If you’d like to submit a question, the deadline is Friday 11 December! This post has more information.

Updates from Component Maintainers/Focus Leads

Build/Test Tools:

@desrosj is continuing to work on the GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Action workflows and backporting the local Docker environment to the remaining older branches.

@desrosj has been working one repo at a time to convert the Travis configurations to workflows. If you maintain any repositories under the WordPress GitHub organization and want to help with the transition, feel free to DM him.

Open Floor

@afragen requested some extra eyes on #51976. If you’re able to help out, please add your comments to the ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker.. And also added that if you’re after a larger challenge to take a look at #51928, noting that patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. might need to be moved to #51857.

Next Dev Chat meetings

The next meetings will take place on Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 05:00 UTC and Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 20:00 UTC in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions.

#5-6, #5-7, #dev-chat, #summary

Dev Chat Summary – 2 December 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @peterwilsoncc and @thewebprincess while @mikeschroder and @johnbillion took notes. Full meeting transcript on Slack. Both groups followed this pre-prepared agenda.

Announcements

Highlighted Posts

  • A Week in Core – November 23, 2020
  • What’s next in Gutenberg? The monthly report is out
  • Discussion: Update the updater
  • Dev Notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. are continue to be updated ready for final release, here’s the latest dev-notes.
  • Release cycle discussion post – we need your feedback!
  • WP Notify project review

Component maintainers and focus leads

@peterwilsoncc reminded everyone that these components are in need of maintainers:

If you’re wondering what being a maintainer involves, @markparnell linked this guide from @francina.

Open Floor

@noisysocks requested review on #51612, which aims to make the  render_block_data, pre_render_block and render_block_context filters run on nested blocks. The PR with the latest approach can be found here.

The 2000 UTC group discussed #51913 and #51918 which led into a general discussion about the level of PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 support in 5.6 and how to communicate it. @marybaum asked for clarity to ensure all the marketing messaging is accurate.

The current consensus is that coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. is “betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process.-compatible”, which means 5.6 works on its own with PHP 8, but that any given site may not work due to the plugins and themes in use and that more defensive programming is needed in core.

Next Dev Chat Meeting

The next meetings will take place on December 9, 2020 at 0500UTC and December 9, 2020 at 2000UTC in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

Apologies

Apologies from @johnbillion for the late posting of this summary. The post sat in draft until today when I was reminded of it.

Onwards!

#5-6, #5-7, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

REST API Changes in WordPress 5.6

WordPress 5.6 introduces a number of changes to the REST APIREST API The REST API is an acronym for the RESTful Application Program Interface (API) that uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST and DELETE data. It is how the front end of an application (think “phone app” or “website”) can communicate with the data store (think “database” or “file system”) https://developer.wordpress.org/rest-api/., some of which have been covered in other dev notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase..

Below are some other noteworthy changes that deserve a call out.

Search

The wp/v2/search endpoint introduced in WordPress 5.0 provides a unified interface for searching across multiple content types. WordPress 5.6 adds a terms and post formats search handler. For example, to search across terms in all taxonomies, make the following request: https://example.org/wp-json/wp/v2/search?type=term&search=my-term. To search post-formats, use the post-format type: https://example.org/wp-json/wp/v2/search?type=post-format&search=aside.

Additionally, the REST API search infrastructure no longer requires that the id for each item is an integer. Strings are now an acceptable id type.

See #51458, #51459, #51131.

JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. Schema

multipleOf keyword

The multipleOf keyword allows for asserting that an integer or number type is a multiple of the given number. For example, this schema will only accept even integers.

{
  "type": "integer",
  "multipleOf": 2
}

multipleOf also supports decimals. For example, this schema could be used to accept a percentage with a maximum of 1 decimal point.

{
  "type": "number",
  "minimum": 0,
  "maximum": 100,
  "multipleOf": 0.1
}

See #51022.

minProperties and maxProperties

The minItems and maxItems keywords can be used for the array type. The minProperties and maxProperties introduces this same functionality for the object type. This is helpful when using additionalProperties to have a list of objects with unique keys.

This schema requires an object that specifies at least 1, and at most 3, colors.

{
  "type": "object",
  "additionalProperties": {
    "type": "string",
    "format": "hex-color"
  },
  "minProperties": 1,
  "maxProperties": 3
}
{
  "primary": "#52accc",
  "secondary": "#096484"
}

See #51023.

patternProperties

The patternProperties keyword is similar to the additionalProperties keyword, but allows for asserting that the property matches a regex pattern. The keyword is an object where each property is a regex pattern and its value is the JSON Schema used to validate properties that match that pattern.

For example, this schema requires that each value is a hex color and the property must only contain “word” characters.

{
  "type": "object",
  "patternProperties": {
    "^\\w+$": {
      "type": "string",
      "format": "hex-color"
    }
  },
  "additionalProperties": false
}

When the REST API validates the patternProperties schema, if a property doesn’t match any of the patterns, the property will be allowed and not have any validation applied to its contents. This behaves the same as the properties keyword. If this logic isn’t desired, add additionalProperties to the schema to disallow non-matching properties. See #51024.

oneOf and anyOf

These are advanced keywords that allow for the JSON Schema validator to choose one of many schemas to use when validating a value. The anyOf keyword allows for a value to match at least one of the given schemas. Whereas, the oneOf keyword requires the value match exactly one schema.

For example, this schema allows for submitting an array of “operations” to an endpoint. Each operation can either be a “crop” or a “rotation”.

{
  "type": "array",
  "items": {
    "oneOf": [
      {
        "title": "Crop",
        "type": "object",
        "properties": {
          "operation": {
            "type": "string",
            "enum": [
              "crop"
            ]
          },
          "x": {
            "type": "integer"
          },
          "y": {
            "type": "integer"
          }
        }
      },
      {
        "title": "Rotation",
        "type": "object",
        "properties": {
          "operation": {
            "type": "string",
            "enum": [
              "rotate"
            ]
          },
          "degrees": {
            "type": "integer",
            "minimum": 0,
            "maximum": 360
          }
        }
      }
    ]
  }
}

The REST API will loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. over each schema specified in the oneOf array and look for a match. If exactly one schema matches, then validation will succeed. If more than one schema matches, validation will fail. If no schemas match, then the validator will try to find the closest matching schema and return an appropriate error message.

operations[0] is not a valid Rotation. Reason: operations[0][degrees] must be between 0 (inclusive) and 360 (inclusive)

See #51025.

Expose all JSON Schema keywords in the index

When making an OPTIONS request to an endpoint, the REST API will return the args that the route accepts. Previously, only a limited subset of JSON Schema keywords were exposed. In WordPress 5.6, now the full list of JSON Schema keywords that the REST API supports will be exposed. See #51020.

More specific validation error codes

When the type of a value is incorrect, rest_validate_value_from_schema now returns rest_invalid_type instead of the generic rest_invalid_param. The validation error code is not currently exposed to REST API clients. This would only effect direct usages of the validation function.

Miscellaneous

The apiRequest library now supports using the PUT and DELETE HTTPHTTP HTTP is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web and this protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. methods with servers that didn’t support those methods. This is done by making the request a POST request and passing the original HTTP method in the X-HTTP-Method-Override headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes.. #43605.

The comments controller now uses the rest_get_route_for_post function introduced in WordPress 5.5 to generate the up response link. This function is filterable to allow for custom controllers to properly define their REST API route. #44152.

The REST API now supports a broader range of JSON media types. Previously, only application/json was supported which prevented using subtypes like application/activity+json. The REST API will now json_decode the body of requests using a JSON subtype Content-Type. Additionally, wp_die() now properly sends the error as JSON when a JSON subtype is specified in the Accept header. #49404.

Props @m_butcher for reviewing.

#5-6, #dev-notes, #rest-api

WordPress 5.6 RC 5

A fifth and final release candidaterelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta). for the WordPress 5.6 release has been packaged to mark the code freeze before release tomorrow, December 8. The following changes have been made since RC 4:

  • Twenty Twenty One: Fix nesting of main element ([49760] for #51944)
  • Application Passwords: Ensure detection accounts for multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site ([49765] for #51939)
  • Bundled Themes: Bump all versions for release ([49766] for #51919)

You can download the package here or use the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to update your sites. Happy testing, and see you all tomorrow in #core for the WordPress 5.6 release party!

#5-6

WordPress 5.6 RC 4

Hot on the heels of RC 3, again in preparation for the final release of WordPress 5.6 on December 8, an RC 4 has been packaged and released to fix two late-discovered blocking issues:

  • A PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 fatal error when cropping images ([49753] for #51937)
  • A conflictconflict A conflict occurs when a patch changes code that was modified after the patch was created. These patches are considered stale, and will require a refresh of the changes before it can be applied, or the conflicts will need to be resolved. between Application Passwords and HTTPHTTP HTTP is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web and this protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. Basic Auth ([49754] for #51939)

A special thanks to the reporters of both issues for being able to test patches and confirm the fixes.

You can download the package here or use the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to update your sites. Happy testing, and here’s to a smooth final release!

#5-6

WordPress 5.6 RC 3

In preparation for the final release of WordPress 5.6 on December 8, an RC 3 has been packaged and released to update the editor packages and sodium_compat, along with fixes for application passwords, auto-updates, and PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 compatibility in multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site. See all commits on Trac

You can download the package here or use the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to update your sites. Happy testing, and here’s to a smooth final release!

#5-6

WordPress 5.6: Core Editor Overview

With WordPress 5.6 around the corner, this post is your “one-stop shop” for all of the new coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. editor related features and changes coming to your sites. While this release won’t bring changes to the widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. or navigation interfaces, plenty of exciting features and improvements are coming to the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editing experience!

To make it easy to skim through to your favorite parts, we have grouped features into a few relevant sections.

Content creation

Creating the perfect content gets easier as editor tools continue to improve.

Setting a sharp gradient background.
Colors in the list block, and setting a sharp gradient.
  • Create richer backgrounds with the new cover block video position controls. #22531
  • Background images in the cover block can now be repeated to form patterns. #26001
  • Add some color to your lists. #21387
  • Create a sharp gradient #24967
  • Define your content image sizes with the new media and text blocks. #24795
  • Columns block has a new one-column option, opening up more potential for layouts. #24055
  • Select several blocks and transform them into a Columns block with one click! #16504
  • Video subtitles functionality was added, enabling creators to upload subtitles and allowing more people to access video content. #7673
  • Get ahead of time zone snafus when scheduling a post with the timezone hints. #23400
Timezone in post publish settings.

Adapting the experience

One size doesn’t fit all! Check out these new options, continuing improvements, and adaptations to the content creating experience.

  • Display buttons as text-only instead of icon-only: this gives options for how you experience the toolbar; an important improvement for accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility). #10524
  • Find a reorganized and user-friendly Options modal, now named “Preferences.”   #25837, #26198
  • Get full search results with post author and parent page selectors autocomplete component. (Post author selector: #23237 and parent page selector: #25267)
  • Need a focused writing experience? Check out these writing enhancements: #22494
  • The drag handle is back in the block toolbar! Along with a bunch of enhancements for a smoother drag and drop experience. #24852
  • Search blocks and patterns easily across all inserters. #25105
  • Display site icon (if one is set) in full-screen mode: bringing your site branding to the editing experience. #22952
  • Need to reach that word minimum? Character count now shows in the info panel. #24832
New settings in the preferences modal.

Under the hood

  • Block supports is a new APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. that allows block authors to add customization options (such as font size, text color, or gradient) by simply declaring support for them in the block attributes. Find out all the details in this post.
  • Column and Group blocks now allow template lock to be set as an attribute. This allows template authors to define whether or not to lock their columns and groups. #26128
  • Block API version 2 advances the cause of bringing the editor DOM tree closer to the saved content, by allowing blocks to render their own wrapper element. Block authors can find more info on how to use it in this post.

Themes

This release introduced the default theme Twenty Twenty One. This led to a few iterations in the editor, improving theming for everyone and even allowing block patterns to be styled more easily.

  • Separator block now has more alignment options opening up more ability to go with the content you are creating. #25080
  • Add wide and full width support to headings: allowing headers to adapt with your content. #25655 
  • Dark mode now extends to your placeholders  #26483
  • Columns now support fixed widths for more layout options. #24711

Bugs

Over 100 bugs were fixed, across multiple areas of the editing experience.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release!

This post was written and edited in collaboration with @karmatosed, @annezazu, @kellychoffman, @matveb, @cbringmann and @andreamiddleton.

#5-6, #core-editor

Dev Chat Agenda: December 2nd 2020

Here is the #agenda for this week’s meetings happening at:
Wednesday, 2 December 2020, 0500UTC and Wednesday, 2 December 2020, 2000UTC .

  • Announcements –
  • Highlighted blogblog (versus network, site) posts –
    • A Week in Core – November 23, 2020 – Get all the news here.
    • What’s next in Gutenberg? The monthly report is out
    • Discussion: Update the updater
    • Dev Notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. are continue to be updated ready for final release, here’s the latest dev-notes
  • Updates from component maintainers and/or focus leads
  • Open Floor
    If you have something else you want to include to the agenda, please mention it in the comments below.

The #dev-chat meetings will be held on Wednesday, 2 December 2020, 05:00UTC and Wednesday, 2 December 2020, 2000UTC. These meetings are held in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack .

#5-6, #agenda

Dev Chat Summary – 25 November 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @thewebprincess while @thelmachido took notes. Full meeting transcript on slack. Both groups followed the pre-prepared agenda

Highlighted Posts

  1.  A week in Core. Take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between November 16 and November 23, 2020
  2. On November 24 the Field Guide was updated with new  Dev notes
  3. WP release cycle. If you work for a company whose product is influenced by WordPress releases, you are encouraged to join the discussion about aligning the WP release cycle with industry standards
  4. PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and themes developers releases depend on CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., so it’s important that extenders reply.
  5. With the 5.6 release scheduled for December 8th, let’s start planning for 5.7. What’s on your wish-list for version 5.7
  6. The marketing team are starting working on ‘the Month in WordPress in their weekly meeting, please reach out if you have any contributions to share.
  7. Last but not least, the PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. is now published. Folks are reminded to continue testing PHP 8

Component maintainers and focus leads

 PHP 8 Dev Notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. @sergeybiryukov advised that PHP 8.0 release is scheduled for November 26. The dev note does a great job summarizing the changes and challenges PHP 8.0 brings for WordPress core and plugin or theme authors, so give it a read. There are a few components without a maintainer, and some that could use more maintainer support, a challenge was raised to people to consider contributing in this way, it’s not as hard as you might be thinking! See the discussion here and pick a component to dive into.

Open Floor


The Marketing Team is working on a social media pack on version 5.6, if anyone would like to support this, please let @lmurillom or @abhanonstopnewsuk know. Follow the conversation on slack 

Questions and answers for version 5.6
Where uploaded yesterday on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. @abhanonstopnewsuk – “ l would like to thank everyone who has already helped with this from the release squad, core and marketing, and a big shout out to @vimes1984 and  @meher who have led these questions and answers work with me over the last month.”

There are a number of tickets coming in since 5.6 RC1. @hellofromtonya will be scheduling a pre-RC2 Scrub Scheduled: Nov 30th @ 1900 UTC and will drop tickets into #core channel over the next few days to escalate.

The theme/theme directory teams have two requests for feedback on the make blogblog (versus network, site)https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/11/18/theme-previews-in-the-time-of-blocks/ and https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/11/19/feedback-requested-resolution-process-for-issues-found-in-live-themes/  please review and add your thoughts.

Mike asked for more testing assistance with https://github.com/WordPress/phpunit-test-runner/issues/121 in the hopes we can get this across the line. Finally, Paal posted a note that he’s going to be focusing on improving the structure of the handbooks, watch this space to see how that develops

Next Dev Chat Meeting

The next meetings will take place on Wednesday, December 2, 2020, 07:00 AM GMT+2 and Wednesday, December 2, 2020, 10:00 PM GMT+2 in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

#5-6, #5-7, #dev-chat, #summary