Test scrub for WordPress 5.6 RC1 and office hours

As part of the 5.6 release, we’ll be hosting a Release Candidaterelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta). 1 focused test scrub on 11/20/2020 13:30 UTC in the #core channel on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

In particular, we will focus on user testing. Since there are no use-cases listed, we will take the opportunity also to start writing down common actions users perform, so we can build up testing scenarions.

Please join us and share your valuable feedback.

You can read more about Release Candidate 1 on its announcement post.

What you need

  • Test website
  • WordPress 5.6 RC 1:
    • Try the WordPress Beta Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party (choose the “Bleeding edgebleeding edge The latest revision of the software, generally in development and often unstable. Also known as trunk.” channel and BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RC Only” stream options)
    • Or download the release candidate here (zip).

Looking forward to testing with you!

#test, #testing

Auto-update test scrub for WordPress 5.6

As part of the 5.6 release, we’ll be hosting an auto-update focused test scrub this 11/13/2020 13:30 UTC in the #core channel on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

In particular, test different use-cases of the feature:

  • New installation for minor version
  • New installation for major version
  • Upgrade for major version

On single and multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site.

If you want to contribute to this feature by testing, please join us and share your valuable feedback.

You can read more about auto-updates status and progress on two recent blogblog (versus network, site) posts

What you need

  • Test website
  • WordPress 5.6 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 4 (coming out later today)

Looking forward to testing with you!

#test, #testing

Widget screen test scrub for WordPress 5.6

Posted on behalf of @monikarao since she is not a user yet on this blogblog (versus network, site)

As part of the 5.6 release, we’ll be hosting a widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. screen focused test scrub this Friday, October 16, 2020, 13:30 UTC in the #core channel on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 9.1 released a new blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.-based widget screen. This new functionality replaces the previous wp-adminadmin (and super admin) > Appearance > Widgets screen.

If you want to contribute to this feature by testing, please join us and share your valuable feedback.

We are particularly looking for design, functional, as well as UIUI User interface/UXUX User experience feedback.

You can read a blog post this feature: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2020/09/30/call-for-testing-the-widgets-screen-in-gutenberg-9-1/

Action Items:

  • Test the entire flow
  • Backward compatibility testing
  • Extendability testing
  • Disabling the new Widgets Screen
  • Other use cases you might think of!

Looking forward to testing with you!

#test, #testing

Call for testing: PHP 8.0

A long-standing goal of the WordPress project is to be compatible with new versions of PHP on their release day. The next major version of PHP (version 8.0) is currently scheduled for release on November 26, 2020. WordPress Core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org. are working to ensure PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 8.0 is supported in the next major version of WordPress (version 5.6), which is currently scheduled to be released on December 8, 2020.

PHP 8.0 has been in the making for some time and brings a lot of exciting features. But because PHP 8.0 is a major version release, it also includes some backward incompatible changes. Because of this, a great deal of both manual and automated testing is needed in order to ensure the WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. codebase is ready for PHP 8.0.

Even though WordPress 5.6 will add support for PHP 8.0, no changes will be made to the minimum required version of PHP at this time. Any changes made to provide support for PHP 8.0 will be done in a way that maintains backward compatibility for all versions of PHP supported by WordPress (currently to PHP 5.6.20).

Your help is needed to test WordPress on PHP 8.0! While contributors are working on addressing incompatibilities that can be identified by looking at the PHP release notes and upgrade guides, some issues will need to be found through manually testing.

Timeline for testing

Since changes for PHP 8.0 compatibility may be extensive, November 17, 2020 (the current planned date for 5.6 RC 1) should be seen as the cut off date for the change to be included in WordPress 5.6. To ensure that changes receive proper testing, patches and pull requests should be submitted as soon as possible.

How to test WordPress on PHP 8.0

There are a few ways that you can test WordPress on PHP 8.0. Some more experienced developers may prefer to install PHP 8.0 manually on their own. But below are instructions for what is likely the quickest and easiest way for most contributors to get set up with PHP 8.

Local WordPress Core Docker environment

The WordPress development repository includes the tools needed to easily spin up a local Docker environment for developing WordPress. Here’s how to get started using this method.

  • Make sure Docker is installed on your machine and running.
  • Checkout the development repo using GIT or SVN.
  • Edit the .env file in the clone to change LOCAL_PHP=latest to LOCAL_PHP=8.0-fpm (or run export LOCAL_PHP=8.0-fpm in the command line window you are using). If you like to test locally using the build directory, also change LOCAL_DIR to build (or run export LOCAL_DIR=build).
  • Install NPM dependencies by running npm install.
  • Build WordPress using npm run build:dev (or npm run build if you prefer to test locally using the build directory)
  • Start the Docker environment by running npm run env:start.
  • Install WordPress in the Docker container by running npm run env:install.

You will then be able to access the site at localhost:8889 in your browser. As new development versions of PHP 8 are released (rc2, rc3, etc.), the containers will be updated. To ensure you are running the latest version of the PHP 8 container, you can run npm run env:pull. It is recommended that you do this before starting the container anytime you are testing WordPress on PHP 8.

More information on the local Docker setup for developing WordPress can be found in the initial Make Core blog post.

Ways to test

  • Use WordPress to test default Core functionality.
  • Write new unit tests that confirm specific PHP 8.0 features or breaking changes work (or don’t) as expected.
  • Write new tests for areas of the codebase that does not have sufficient test coverage.
  • Test your favorite plugins and themes for issues.

Reporting issues

If you discover something that you believe to be a PHP 8 compatibility issue, please create a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. report on the WordPress Core instance of Trac. Because this is an ongoing effort, it’s possible an issue you have found is already being tracked, is currently being worked on, or has already been fixed. To avoid duplicate reports, please look through pre-existing tickets. The best way to do this is by looking at tickets with the php8 keyword.

Please be sure to provide as many details as you can when creating a ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. and provide steps that are as specific as possible so that other contributors can quickly and easily reproduce the problem.

More ways to help

  • Head over to the php8 keyword report on WordPress Trac and find a ticket that interests you.
  • Give feedback, write a patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing., or test a patch!
  • Inform others that help is needed to test WordPress on PHP 8.0.

To ensure changes receive the necessary testing, it’s best to fix PHP 8.0 compatibility issues as early as possible during the WordPress development schedule. The 5.6 RC1 date (November 17th, 2020) should be considered the final cut off for changes. If additional critical PHP 8.0 issues are found during the RC period, they should receive tickets and patches and will be evaluated on a case by case basis. But, they will not be guaranteed to make the 5.6 release (usually, only regressions are addressed during the RC period). 

Thanks in advance for your help preparing WordPress for PHP 8.0!

Props @sergeybiryukov, @daisyo, @desrosj, and @andreamiddleton for proofreading and peer review.

#php, #testing

An Experimental Outreach Project for Full Site Editing

Update: following some discussion about themes as they relate to full site editing, I’ve extended the deadline for expressing interest in this program for an additional week, closing on 22 May, 2020. – Josepha

As we approach the second release of 2020 with an eye toward WordPress 5.6, I’ve got full site editing (FSE) on my mind. During the WordPress 5.0 retrospective, one of the things that came up routinely was the need for better engagement with users*. It was generally agreed (from all levels and areas of contribution) that users* will be most impacted by GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/, but that users* are also the group we have the least channels of communication to.

To help get user feedback to WordPress developers a little more seamlessly, I am going to try an experimental outreach project. With FSE set to launch by the end of the year, this experiment aims to get feedback about pain points to the right people faster and help keep us on track for Phase 2.

If you are interested in testing early versions of upcoming releases that will make FSE work better for you, your customers, or anyone who is building or maintaining a WordPress site, please fill out this interest form between now and May 14th. By filling out the interest form below, you’ll get more information about the program when it launches: 

Sign me up for more information!

I’m still working on the finer points of this experiment, but the intention is to use Gutenberg in as close to a client setting as possible. Time to provide feedback is flexible but could be up to 3 hours a week on average. Thanks in advance if you’re able to help us shape this work!

The interest form will be open until May 14th, 2020!

#testing #FSE

*Users can be defined in many ways, but in this case, I’m referring to those who build with WordPress (not those who build WordPress) and those who maintain WordPress sites (not those who visit sites).

WordPress 5.3 RC 5

The fifth release candidaterelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta). for WordPress 5.3 is now available for testing.

WordPress 5.3 is currently scheduled to be released on November 12 2019.

There are two ways to test WordPress 5.3 release candidate 5:

  • Try the WordPress Beta Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party (choose the “bleeding edgebleeding edge The latest revision of the software, generally in development and often unstable. Also known as trunk. nightlies” option)
  • Or download the release candidate here (zip).

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.3, please see the first,  secondthird and fourth release candidate posts.

Release Candidate 5 contains some bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes for the new default theme, Twenty Twenty – for reference, see #48557 – and addresses the following tickets:

  • #47708 – 5.3 about page
  • #48312 – Fix a typo in an inline comment
  • #48542 – In wp_default_packages_inline_scripts(), make sure the root URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org middleware is registered before using the media middleware
  • #48543 – Comments: check if comment form element exists before adding a key handler to detect the cmd/ctrl-enter key press.
  • #48517 – Bundled themes: several changes to ensure consistency and accuracy for default theme headers
  • #48518 – Upload: When an image was scaled because it is larger than the big image threshold, use the originally uploaded image’s dimensions in wp_get_missing_image_subsizes(). Fixes an edge case/inconsistent behaviour when a registered image sub-size is also larger than the big image threshold.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.3 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.3. If you find compatibility problems, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure those out before the final release.

The WordPress 5.3 Field Guide has also been published, which details the major changes.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

#5-3, #testing

Report: WP 5.3 Admin CSS changes tested against top 20 plugins

In September 2019, the WordPress AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) team tested WP 5.3 Adminadmin (and super admin) CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. changes against the Top 20 plugins on WordPress.org, to evaluate possible breakage on plugins admin screens and to iterate on the related changes.

This week, those tests were reproduced against 5.3-beta3-46471. This post is a report illustrated with screenshots of relevant admin screens for each pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party.

The idea was to test Admin CSS changes against various use cases to see what could happen and to fix as many found bugs as possible. Of course, not every use cases are covered in 20 plugins, but the Accessibility team assumes it will provide a general view on the robustness of the changes coming in WP 5.3.

A dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. will quickly follow this post, to communicate on all the CSS changes coming in WP 5.3 admin screens to plugin authors and WordPress developers.

To sum up, some plugins which use custom CSS that override WordPress Admin default CSS rules on form controls may have few minor visual glitches. Most notably: the input fields can be taller than before WP 5.3. There’s no breakage as the input fields are fully operable, but plugin authors and WordPress developers are encouraged to:

  • remove any fixed heights: flexible heights are the WordPress recommended standard (and one of the main goals of the Admin CSS changes)
  • remove any custom top and bottom padding values
  • remove any custom line-height values

For each plugin, screenshot are provided. You can click them to see the full media file.

Contact Form 7

This plugin uses default coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. admin styles. No breakage found.

Yoast

This plugin uses both custom styles and default core admin styles. No breakage found. One input and one button are too close to each other in the search appearance page. Looks to be due to incorrect use of margins.

Akismet

This plugin uses both custom styles and default core admin styles. No breakage found.

Classic Editor

This plugin uses default core admin styles. No breakage found.

Jetpack

This plugin uses custom styles. No change found on the screens audited. Further exploration could be needed on specific admin screens. Edit: Jetpack team is already working on some small CSS changes in a dedicated pull request. Worth a read to see how plugins could handle Admin CSS changes.

WooCommerce

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. Two misaligned labels were found in the installation screen. Some inputs have large vertical paddings/heights. No breakage found.

Note: WooCommerce team already worked on Admin CSS changes in a dedicated pull request. An interesting read to see how plugins could handle Admin CSS changes.

WordPress Importer

This plugin uses default admin styles. No breakage found.

Really Simple SSLSSL Secure Sockets Layer. Provides a secure means of sending data over the internet. Used for authenticated and private actions.

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

Elementor Page Builder

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. Small misalignment in one (screenshot 6) of the dozen pages of settings, due to fixed margins. Pretty minor though. No breakage found.

Wordfence Security

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

Duplicate Post

This plugin uses default admin styles. No breakage found.

TinyMCE Advanced

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

All in One SEO Pack

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

WP Forms

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

Google XML Sitemaps

This plugin uses default admin styles. No breakage found.

Google Analytics Dashboard Plugin for WordPress

This plugin uses custom admin styles. No breakage found but the test couldn’t handle each screen of the plugin due to the some issues with plugin’s configuration on local installs.

All-in-One WP MigrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies.

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

UpdraftPlus Backup

This plugin uses both custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.

WP Super Cache

This plugin uses default admin styles. No breakage found.

Google Analytics Dashboard for WP

This plugin mixes custom and default admin styles. No breakage found.


Please note this report is only including Top 20 plugins from WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/, but the changes were also tested on various others plugins, such as WP-Rocket, Advanced Custom Fields, Polylang… and dozens of plugins with less active installations.

#5-3, #accessibility, #testing

Introducing the WordPress e2e tests

The purpose of e2e (end to end) testing is to simulate the real user scenario and validate the different flows. In concrete, running an e2e test involves setting up a production-like environment, opening a browser and interacting with the application as it was a real user manipulating the interface. This is one of the best testing methodologies to avoid regressions.

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ has been successfully using this kind of tests for some time now. Reusable packages to setup and run e2e tests have been built in the repository. Starting today, this setup was brought into WordPress and included in our CI pipeline.

Local Environment

The e2e tests require a production-like environment to run. The current setup relies on Docker to provide a built-in environment.

You can run the environment locally on your own WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. clone.

First, make sure you have Docker installed (instructions on this link).

Then, you should be able to run the environment by running these commands on your own WordPress repository clone.

npm install
npm run env:start

This command will make sure you have the right node/npm versions installed, triggers docker containers for your web and mysqlMySQL MySQL is a relational database management system. A database is a structured collection of data where content, configuration and other options are stored. https://www.mysql.com/. servers and installs WordPress using the build folder.

You can also reset the environment with a testing website using:

npm run env:reset-site

You should be able to access your environment on http://localhost:8889. The default username is admin and the password is password.

Running the e2e tests

Once your environment ready, you can launch the e2e tests suite by running:

npm run test:e2e

This will run the test suite using a headless browser. For debugging purpose, you might want to follow the test visually. You can do so by running the tests in an interactive mode.

npm run test:e2e -- --puppeteer-interactive

you can also run a given test file separately

npm run test:e2e tests/e2e/specs/hello.test.js

Writing e2e tests

The e2e tests live in the tests/e2e/specs folder and should be follow the following naming format my-file.test.js.

The e2e tests use Jest as a testing/asserting framework, and rely on Puppeteer to communicate with the browser.

A typical e2e test looks like that:

// Load utilities from the e2e-test-utils package.
import { visitAdminPage } from '@wordpress/e2e-test-utils';

// Name of the test suite.
describe( 'Hello World', () => {

	// Flow being tested.
	// Ideally each flow is independent and can be run separately.
	it( 'Should load properly', async () => {
		// Navigate the admin and performs tasks
		// Use Puppeteer APIs to interacte with mouse, keyboard...
		await visitAdminPage( '/' );

		// Assertions
		const nodes = await page.$x(
			'//h2[contains(text(), "Welcome to WordPress!")]'
		);
		expect( nodes.length ).not.toEqual( 0 );
	} );
} );

e2e test utilities

When writing e2e test, you’ll notice that some actions are repeated across tests. Things like:

  • Login into the dashboard
  • Go to a page
  • Activate/Deactivate a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party
  • Create a new post
  • Create a dummy page

A number of these utilities is already available in the @wordpress/e2e-test-utils package, in the Gutenberg repository. You’re encouraged to use and share reusable utilities across tests.

In addition to these utilities, you can checkout the Puppeteer API Docs to manipulate the browser.

We need you

Please give it a try, the more we add tests, the more stable our releases will be. If you need support, ask in the #core-js SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel.

#core-editor, #core-js, #testing

Help Test and Capture the Network Admin UI

One of the wider objectives of WordPress 4.3 is to improve on the Networknetwork (versus site, blog) Adminadmin (and super admin) UIUI User interface. This includes refining the experience on different device sizes. We first need to capture a baseline of existing screen flows and identify tickets from that.

We need help capturing this data. 🙂

Having access to a local, multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site WordPress installation is the preferred method, as you’ll have an easier time making changes, applying patches, and generally having control over the data. Here are some guidelines for testing locally:

Realizing that installing and configuring multisite locally can be a barrier, a test server is available for anyone to access. This test server has two network installations, one for subdirectory and another for subdomain. Data will be reset on a regular basis. This allows anyone to go through the various network admin tasks.

Both networks are running trunktrunk A directory in Subversion containing the latest development code in preparation for the next major release cycle. If you are running "trunk", then you are on the latest revision. as of about 20 minutes ago. I’ll be making an effort to automate the maintenance of that setup.

If you’d like a super admin account to these networks, leave a comment below or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” @jeremyfelt anywhere. #core-multisite is preferred. I’ll create a matching username to your wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile name and set you loose to capture and break things at will. 🙂

Once you have a test network available, here are the things we need captured:

  • Add a new user to a site when the user does not currently exist as a network user.
  • Add a new user to a site when the user does exist as a network user.
  • Install, enable, and then activate a theme for a single site on the network.
  • Install a theme and enable it for use on a network.
  • Install and then activate a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party for use on a single site on the network.
  • Install and then network activate a plugin.
  • Create a new site on the network.
  • Update a plugin.
  • Update a theme.
  • Edit the domain/path for an existing site on the network.

Once captured, it’s great to share all of the data on the Make/Flow site, with a description of the screens tested and the device/browser configuration. If you need access to Make/Flow to post your results, leave a comment here or in #coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.-flow.

Specific details on each of these screens should also be added to this spreadsheet that the overall Admin UI team is using to coordinate efforts. Feel free to capture one workflow or many.

If you notice a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. in the screens you have captured, or in the screens captured by somebody else, it should be reported. Ask in #core-multisite or #core-flow on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. if you need any help.

#flow, #multisite, #testing

We must be our own beta audience.

Using the beta tester plugin, I follow trunktrunk A directory in Subversion containing the latest development code in preparation for the next major release cycle. If you are running "trunk", then you are on the latest revision. through every phase of development via five devices (iPhone 5, iPhone 6+, Nexus 5, iPad Air, Macbook). With the plugin installed, select “Bleeding edgebleeding edge The latest revision of the software, generally in development and often unstable. Also known as trunk. nightlies”. Every day, your site will auto update to the latest nightly build. We committed long ago to ensuring that trunk is continuously dogfoodable and quickly fixed in the rare event that something nasty happens, like a fatal error. I have never once experienced loss of content while following trunk.  If you follow this blogblog (versus network, site), consider putting the betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party on a real site that you use regularly. We must take this small extra risk with our own sites so that we truly see what we’re making before releasing it.

We desperately need mobile beta testers. WordPress will be a champion of the open mobile web. We will work around the iOSiOS The operating system used on iPhones and iPads. Safari bugs that hamper us. We will make the mobile web a better place. With the beta tester plugin installed on a public site, testing betas from any touch device is as straightforward as testing from the desktop. Despite this ease, 4.2 in its current state is a regressionregression A software bug that breaks or degrades something that previously worked. Regressions are often treated as critical bugs or blockers. Recent regressions may be given higher priorities. A "3.6 regression" would be a bug in 3.6 that worked as intended in 3.5. from 4.1 on mobile, particularly on iOS. We’ll work through these problems before release, but we really need mobile beta testers as well as mobile patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. testers. Mobile patch testing (and patch testing in general) is not so easy to set up. We need better tools and documentation here.

Check out the Beta Testing section of the Core Development Handbook for help setting up the Beta Tester plugin. I’m always hanging out in the #core-flow Slack channel as @boren if you have questions. Let’s build a mobile beta audience.

#beta, #beta-testing-flow, #testing