DevChat Meeting Summary: January 7, 2021

@thewebprincess and @webcommsat led the weekly meetings of the WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. team, respectively at 05:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC.

Thanks to @nalininonstopnewsuk and @webcommsat for the notes.
Slack archive for the 20:00 UTC meeting.

Announcements

  1. WordPress 5.7 news

2. Workshop submissions and testing calls

  • Full Site editing update
  • Learn WordPress
    • Got a dev workshop, or thinking of designing one? Submit it to Learn WordPress. Here’s a great example on using tracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress., that is already there: https://learn.wordpress.org/workshops/.
    • Follow and share promotions for #LearnWP and Meetups on social media too @WordCamp, @WordPressEvents and LinkedIn.

3. Monthly and weekly updates/ bulletins

Updates from the Component Maintainers and Focus Leads

Component maintainers do really important work. More about components at https://make.wordpress.org/core/components/

  • Update from @sergey:
    • Build/Test Tools – These change the frequency of code coverage reporting. A change was made in [49931] to display a relatively accurate code coverage data at https://codecov.io/gh/WordPress/wordpress-develop on any given day of the week.
    • Some other changes include updating several NPM packages and simplifying Composer package caching
    • I18Ni18n Internationalization, or the act of writing and preparing code to be fully translatable into other languages. Also see localization. Often written with a lowercase i so it is not confused with a lowercase L or the numeral 1. Often an acquired skill., Date/Time, Permalinks: No major news this week.
  • Update from @sarahricker on accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility)
    • several Accessibility Team members volunteered to stay up to date with accessibility needs for each component/focus
    • if your component doesn’t connect with an Accessibility member soon, let the team know.

Open Floor

  • Update from @Sergey on GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party:
    • After almost a month since WordPress 5.6, for some reason the Gutenberg plugin still shows “Tested up to: 5.5.3” in the Plugin Directory and “Untested with your version of WordPress” when searching from a WordPress 5.6 adminadmin (and super admin), leading to search results that are not exactly great: https://cldup.com/nmU8Bq64U1.png
    • Note how every other plugin is listed as “compatible with your version of WordPress…”, but Gutenberg is “untested”.
    • Could we have an established process for updating the “Tested up to” version for Gutenberg? Boosting exact slug/name matches for plugin search was previously discussed in #meta3327 and some other MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets. Apparently it’s not something that can or should be done at this time, however making sure that the “Tested up to” version is accurate should give us better search results. Ticket #3327: Searching with exact plugin name has it on page 3 of results
  • Promoting guidance for updating plugins to related WordPress versions
    • @webcommsat: Marketing has heard from Meetups and contributor events on intro talks on plugins development or basic talks on installing plugins: uncertainty about how plugins show they update to the current version. Potential to further promote guidance and advice.
    • @audrasjb recommended the Plugin development FAQ

Goals for 2021

Tickets requesting feedback

#5-7#devchat

#5-7, #core, #devchat

Dev Chat Summary – 2 December 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @peterwilsoncc and @thewebprincess while @mikeschroder and @johnbillion took notes. Full meeting transcript on Slack. Both groups followed this pre-prepared agenda.

Announcements

Highlighted Posts

  • A Week in Core – November 23, 2020
  • What’s next in Gutenberg? The monthly report is out
  • Discussion: Update the updater
  • Dev Notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. are continue to be updated ready for final release, here’s the latest dev-notes.
  • Release cycle discussion post – we need your feedback!
  • WP Notify project review

Component maintainers and focus leads

@peterwilsoncc reminded everyone that these components are in need of maintainers:

If you’re wondering what being a maintainer involves, @markparnell linked this guide from @francina.

Open Floor

@noisysocks requested review on #51612, which aims to make the  render_block_data, pre_render_block and render_block_context filters run on nested blocks. The PR with the latest approach can be found here.

The 2000 UTC group discussed #51913 and #51918 which led into a general discussion about the level of PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 support in 5.6 and how to communicate it. @marybaum asked for clarity to ensure all the marketing messaging is accurate.

The current consensus is that coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. is “betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process.-compatible”, which means 5.6 works on its own with PHP 8, but that any given site may not work due to the plugins and themes in use and that more defensive programming is needed in core.

Next Dev Chat Meeting

The next meetings will take place on December 9, 2020 at 0500UTC and December 9, 2020 at 2000UTC in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

Apologies

Apologies from @johnbillion for the late posting of this summary. The post sat in draft until today when I was reminded of it.

Onwards!

#5-6, #5-7, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

WordPress 5.6 RC 5

A fifth and final release candidaterelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta). for the WordPress 5.6 release has been packaged to mark the code freeze before release tomorrow, December 8. The following changes have been made since RC 4:

  • Twenty Twenty One: Fix nesting of main element ([49760] for #51944)
  • Application Passwords: Ensure detection accounts for multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site ([49765] for #51939)
  • Bundled Themes: Bump all versions for release ([49766] for #51919)

You can download the package here or use the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to update your sites. Happy testing, and see you all tomorrow in #core for the WordPress 5.6 release party!

#5-6

Media Meeting Recap – December 03, 2020

The following is a summary of the weekly Media component meeting that occurred on Thursday, November 3, 2020 at 15:00 UTC. Weekly media meetings are held every Thursday at 15:00 UTC. A full transcript can be found here in the #core-media room in the Make WordPress Slack.

Attendees: @antpb, @sergeybiryukov, @joedolson, @hellofromtonya, @joel-yoder, @mista-flo, @aristath, @alexdeborba

Media Focus for 5.7

The focus for 5.7 was discussed and it was mentioned that there were many outstanding accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) issues that should be considered. It was agreed these should be moved into the scope of the release.

#50105: Remove infinite scrolling behavior from the Media grid

#50273: Media modal uses incorrect ‘checkbox’ role for list items

#47120: Media modals: Upload errors and field information are not associated with their control

#39004: Alt attributes should be searchable in media library

There has been a bit of buzz in the Media SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel around a desire for more modern media formats to be considered as a focus. @azaozz recommended prior to the meeting that the following is considered when modern image formats are considered for 5.7.

A Media Focus Lead for 5.7 would be good if everybody here thinks we’ll manage to add support for (at least) .webp . Currently this is still at the “exploratory” stage. Main questions that needs solid answers:

How to resize WebP images?

How to detect browsers that don’t support WebP and serve fallback images?

Would WP expect the users to upload WebP images or would it convert JPEGs, PNGs and GIFs to WebP?

Seems that ideally WP will convert uploaded images to WebP and serve them when the site visitor’s browser supports them. The originally uploaded images would serve as fallback. Determining browser support would be best by “Server-side content negotiation via Accept headers”. Replacing <img> with <picture> on the fly would bring a lot of side effects/compat problems. Frankly not sure if that would be ready by the cut-off time of early to mid February, even if work starts right now  On the other hand, this needs to be done, 5.7 or not.

@azaozz

After a bit of discussion from attendees, it was generally agreed that for modern media formats there is still discovery work that needs to happen, a proposal to scope the work, and an outline of risks and blockers. The questions asked by @azaozz above are a good starting point in thinking this through.

@joedolson asked “Is there any reason modern image types can’t be staged across multiple releases? E.g., add support for uploading & inserting modern image types, and expand usage later? There’s nothing about adding WebP and SVG that requires them to be globally used; just made available. The bigger problems seem to be in what happens if you start auto-switching existing images between img/picture, etc.”

We’ll leave these these notes on 5.7 with an invitation to comment below about further considerations.

Time of Meeting

For frequent attendees it was determined that the current time of 15:00 UTC is currently working for most people’s schedules. If there are any thoughts on this time, feel free to comment below!

Props @antpb for proofreading and final review.

#core, #media, #summary

Update the updater

WordPress updates for CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., plugins, and themes are based on a number of Core classes:

Alongside these main classes are several other update-related classes and functions, including those for updating translations.

Which updates are we talking about?

The ability to manually update WordPress from the adminadmin (and super admin) area, and to install and update plugins and themes, has existed since 2.3 in 2007.

Auto-update features were added in WordPress 3.7 (for minor releases), extended in 5.5 (as opt-in for plugins and themes), and 5.6 (major releases). To make the user experience of auto-updates even better, and build trust with users and extenders, it’s important that this mechanism works well and provides all the failsafe checks needed.

The WordPress Core update has proven to be generally reliable, but it doesn’t actually have many tests nor is well documented. There are also some reliability concerns around adding new files and the overall number of changed files, which is the reason WordPress currently tries to keep the number of changed files in minor releases to a minimum.

Plugins and themes updaters are older: in general, all of them can be improved.

Why now?

With the introduction of auto-updates, these processes are run even more often. So relatively small issues get triggered more often, and with that become a bigger problem. They also now more often run unattended: an auto update that breaks could lead to quite problematic results.

As one of the most widely used plugins in the WordPress ecosystem, at Yoast we have already experienced some pains related to these processes. That, combined with the fact that these processes will now trigger more often, made us decide to actively work on these issues.
We believe that other pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and theme authors have gone through the same experiences and we hope they, and other interested people, will join us in this effort of updating the updater.

What are we working on

In January, team members at Yoast will start

  • combing through TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. to find all open tickets: start with Core, then move to Plugins and eventually Themes;
  • reviewing all the classes involved to make sure their code is efficient and if there is room for improvement.

What are the next steps

This is a big project, one that can help other thousands of companies, so I hope you will join us in the effort.

We have created a GitHub repository under Yoast’s company account. As soon as we will start working actively on the project, you will find in it a project board where we are documenting and managing all we are doing. Once the research part is over, and the steps to take to improve the updaters are clear, we will start weekly meetings in #core or a dedicated channel.

Timeline

  • January 2021 – February – Research and proposal phase
  • March – May – Coding and documenting

I hope you will join us!

Thanks @sergeybiryukov and @joostdevalk for the peer review.
30/11 – Updated for clarity, thanks @audrasjb and @claytoncollie for the questions and the suggestions

#updater

Dev Chat Summary – 25 November 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @thewebprincess while @thelmachido took notes. Full meeting transcript on slack. Both groups followed the pre-prepared agenda

Highlighted Posts

  1.  A week in Core. Take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between November 16 and November 23, 2020
  2. On November 24 the Field Guide was updated with new  Dev notes
  3. WP release cycle. If you work for a company whose product is influenced by WordPress releases, you are encouraged to join the discussion about aligning the WP release cycle with industry standards
  4. PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and themes developers releases depend on CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., so it’s important that extenders reply.
  5. With the 5.6 release scheduled for December 8th, let’s start planning for 5.7. What’s on your wish-list for version 5.7
  6. The marketing team are starting working on ‘the Month in WordPress in their weekly meeting, please reach out if you have any contributions to share.
  7. Last but not least, the PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8 dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. is now published. Folks are reminded to continue testing PHP 8

Component maintainers and focus leads

 PHP 8 Dev Notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. @sergeybiryukov advised that PHP 8.0 release is scheduled for November 26. The dev note does a great job summarizing the changes and challenges PHP 8.0 brings for WordPress core and plugin or theme authors, so give it a read. There are a few components without a maintainer, and some that could use more maintainer support, a challenge was raised to people to consider contributing in this way, it’s not as hard as you might be thinking! See the discussion here and pick a component to dive into.

Open Floor


The Marketing Team is working on a social media pack on version 5.6, if anyone would like to support this, please let @lmurillom or @abhanonstopnewsuk know. Follow the conversation on slack 

Questions and answers for version 5.6
Where uploaded yesterday on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. @abhanonstopnewsuk – “ l would like to thank everyone who has already helped with this from the release squad, core and marketing, and a big shout out to @vimes1984 and  @meher who have led these questions and answers work with me over the last month.”

There are a number of tickets coming in since 5.6 RC1. @hellofromtonya will be scheduling a pre-RC2 Scrub Scheduled: Nov 30th @ 1900 UTC and will drop tickets into #core channel over the next few days to escalate.

The theme/theme directory teams have two requests for feedback on the make blogblog (versus network, site)https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/11/18/theme-previews-in-the-time-of-blocks/ and https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/11/19/feedback-requested-resolution-process-for-issues-found-in-live-themes/  please review and add your thoughts.

Mike asked for more testing assistance with https://github.com/WordPress/phpunit-test-runner/issues/121 in the hopes we can get this across the line. Finally, Paal posted a note that he’s going to be focusing on improving the structure of the handbooks, watch this space to see how that develops

Next Dev Chat Meeting

The next meetings will take place on Wednesday, December 2, 2020, 07:00 AM GMT+2 and Wednesday, December 2, 2020, 10:00 PM GMT+2 in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

#5-6, #5-7, #dev-chat, #summary

Media Meeting Recap – November 12, 2020

The following is a summary of the weekly media component meeting that occurred on Thursday, November 5, 2020 at 15:00 UTC. Weekly media meetings are held every Thursday at 15:00 UTC. A full transcript can be found here in the #core-media room in the Make WordPress Slack.

Attendees: @antpb, @sageshilling, @johnbillion, @paaljoachim, @hellofromtonya, @mista-flo, @hongnizzle

5.6 Remaining Tickets

@mista-flo mentioned two tickets that were not included in the 5.6 milestone but should have. These have been committed as of today.

#39968Media Library: deleting all items on the last page loses the pagination/navigation buttons and shows message – The ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. is related to existing changes in 5.6 and wasn’t added to the milestone. This has been reviewed and committed.

#51396[Media upload.php] Switch back from grid to list mode reopen the modal – Consensus from those present in the media meeting was that this was a safe change to include in the 5.6 milestone. It has since been committed.

Because there wasn’t time to complete the agenda item to review new tickets that require attention, @antpb is proposing a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrub away from the regular meeting times. The list has grown quite a bit, so any assistance is appreciated! Please leave a comment below with a time that works for you.

Props @antpb for proofreading and final review.

#core, #media, #summary

Media Meeting Recap – November 5, 2020

The following is a summary of the weekly media component meeting that occurred on Thursday, November 5, 2020 at 15:00 UTC. Weekly media meetings are held every Thursday at 15:00 UTC. A full transcript can be found here in the #core-media room in the Make WordPress Slack.

Attendees: @antpb, @johnbillion, @sergeybiryukov, @desrosj, @hongnizzle

5.6 Remaining Tickets

#41648Alignment issue on media-new.php when browse uploader screen is active – Currently owned by @antpb. The ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. will be reviewed and committed by end of day November 6, 2020.

#22363Accents in attachment filenames should be sanitized@antpb will be reviewing ticket to confirm pending issues have been addressed before closing.

#51665wp_get_image_editor() ->save stopped creating the directory in 5.6-beta2-49360@mikeschroder has responded to ticket and there are still tasks to be completed.

#42663Imagick support for stream wrappersDev notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. are pending for this ticket. Otherwise, if no notes are available, then the commit message describes the changes very well.

#51685: Media Element CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. Issue : Some layout display crop – Per @antpb, this ticket has recently moved to 5.6 as a fix to some UIUI User interface bits. Very recently refreshed. Will be completed by @antpb.

With these pending tickets addressed, the milestone will be cleared! Thank you everyone!

Props @antpb for proofreading and final review.

#core, #media, #summary

Dev Chat Summary – 28 October 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @thewebprincess while @thelmachido took notes. Full meeting transcript on slack

Both groups followed the pre-prepared agenda and started the chat by celebrating the release of WordPress 5.6 Beta 2, please test and review the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. version and share any bugs/issues.

Announcements

WP Version 5.5.2 is scheduled for release on October 29th

Highlighted Posts

@helen is running code review/commit office hours for 5.6, you can get more information about it here.

@chanthaboune outlined the rationale behind dropping the Widgets screen from 5.6 catch up on that and the plan going forward here.

Dark Mode for Twenty Twenty-One
Discussions are ongoing and the team has outlined some options that your input could help narrow down.

Calls for maintainers and focus leads

PHP 8 call for testing
@sergeybiryukov highlighted again that there is need for more testing on PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher 8, we have to expand test coverage and creat tickets for any issues found. A thorough report has been written by @omarreiss, @jrff, and @herregroen about the current state of PHP 8 and its compatibility with WP.

Build/Test Tools
Docker environment was updated to allow for using multiple PHP Unit versions, get more details on that here. (Note: this is currently temporarily reverted to investigate test failures) Also, some changes were made to account for the recently released Composer 2.0.

Upgrade/Install Component Update
@audrasjb is drafting on a dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. for #50907. It should be ready for review by the Docs lead/cohort/mentor.

Open Floor

Take part in the 2020 WP English Survey, if you are interested to see 2019 survey results, or get links to the 2020 survey in French, German, Japanese, Russian, or Spanish, you can find all that here!

Block Pattern Directory Ideas and Discussion
@daisyo surfaced the post for feedback.

@audrasjb is working on a technical proposal for dropping support/security backports for very old versions of WordPress. He is going to publish a Make CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. post and open a ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. with a patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. proposal very soon. The topic should be ready for discussion during the next dev chat. Comments are welcome here. Follow the conversation on slack

Join the team for the next bug scrub on Friday

WP 5.6 Beta 3 is Scheduled for next Monday.

Next Dev Chat meetings

The next meetings will take place on Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 07:00 AM GMT+2 and Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 10:00 PM GMT+2 in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

#5-5, #5-5-1, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

What’s next in Gutenberg? (October)

This is a monthly update containing the high-level items that GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ contributors are focusing on for October. Please join us in our efforts and let us know in the comments if anything is blocking you from doing so. 

How to follow along with Gutenberg: 

Here’s an overview of different ways to keep up with Gutenberg and the Full Site Editing project. There is also an index page of Gutenberg development related posts and a new Site Editing Milestone overview issue that breaks down the upcoming work into more concrete next steps. 

5.6 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1 Preparation 

With October 20th marking the cut off for WordPress 5.6 Beta 1, there’s going to be a shift in approach this month to focus on what can or cannot be ready for 5.6 since, after the Beta 1, there’s not a way to merge additional features. As part of this preparation, a decision was made by the people working on the Navigation and the editor tech lead for 5.6 to exclude the Navigation Screen from 5.6. Outside of this decision, this focus mainly impacts projects like the Widgets Screen and various editor focused APIs as they will each need to reach a certain threshold in order to be included. Expect there to be lots of effort here to fine tune and make decisions in preparation for an exciting 5.6 release! 

Delaying 9.2 Release:

As mentioned in the latest core editor meeting, since Beta 1 for WordPress 5.6 is due on October 20, it’s likely that the next Gutenberg release will be delayed by one week in order to match the dates and include as many features as possible. This means that Oct 19th will likely be the RC for 9.2 and the stable release will be done on Oct 21 since the packages can be incorporated into CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. before Beta 1.

Follow along:

Outside of following individual features and their progress, you can follow where things stand on this WordPress 5.6 Must Haves project board.

Global Styles & Editor focused APIs

Global Styles refers to the system that defines and manages global aesthetics allowing overall site styles, theme styles, and blocks to work well together. While great progress was made in September, the editor focused APIs are still in experimental status and a decision will need to be made about what can be included in 5.6. It’s anticipated that the theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. APIs might not be ready for 5.6 but the block.json one might be instead. Outside of decisions around 5.6, some of this work in the month ahead will include the following:

  • Adding support for themes to control the editor in a global context, and in a per blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. context.
  • Expand the global styles sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. with new options and improve its UIUI User interface.
  • Expand the typography controls and allow users to pick a custom font family and font-weight, and allow themes to configure which font families are available.
  • Add functionality that allows users to use the global styles sidebar to control the editor’s behavior like which color palette is active.

Follow along:

You can follow the progress for this overall system in this overview issue. For more recent and immediate next steps, you can follow this issue describing the current state of work. 

WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. Screen

With the new Widget screen moved out of experimental status last month in Gutenberg 8.9, lots of work has gone towards addressing the feedback that’s come in as people have begun exploring this new screen. Right now, inclusion in 5.6 depends on the state of the Widget Screen before Beta 1 on October 20th. In an effort to successfully have this feature included in 5.6, efforts that were previously put towards the Navigation Screen are now being redirected here. As a result, expect that this area of work will be a big focus and decision point for the month ahead.

Along with handling any additional feedback that comes in, the following are specific items that will be worked on:

  • Deciding a path forward for how best to handle customizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings. & the widget screen interaction.
  • Creating updated designs for an improved user experience.
  • Exploring how third party widgets can be integrated.
  • Ensuring only superadmins can store HTML using the new APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. endpoint.
  • Addressing a11yAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) feedback around improving the navigation tool.

Join the Widgets Screen weekly meeting:

In light of the decision mentioned above, the previous meeting on the Navigation Screen project will now focus on Widgets. As a reminder, the meeting happens in #core every Wednesday at 7AM UTC. These meetings will be focused on triaging issues in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ with the [Feature] Widget Screen label and discussing any big structural issues. 

Help with testing:

As part of the vision for the Widgets Screen to ease adoption for everyone, modernize the experience outside of just site editing, and upgrade what’s possible by enabling third party extensibility, feedback is still needed to help this become a reality. If you haven’t had a chance to yet, please follow this call for testing and share any bugs or enhancements on GitHub. Thank you to everyone who has given feedback already and helped move this work forward! 

Follow along:

You can follow the progress of this work on this project board and by joining the weekly chat in #core every Wednesday at 7AM UTC.

Full Site Editing

As with the prior months, work on this major focus for phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to continue iterating over the coming months. Currently, 5 out of the 6 milestones for site editing are marked as In Progress with overview tracking issues created for each milestone to better plan next steps. With that said, work this month will continue to focus on finishing up Milestone 1 – Site Editing Infrastructure and UI and Milestone 2 – Site Editor Navigation. As in prior months, it’s expected that this work will continue into the months ahead:

We’re watching the Theme Experiments repo as well to see how themers are attempting to build block-based themes. Please continue to share there and know we appreciate it!

Follow along:

You can follow the progress of this project on this project board. To help break down this work more, a new overview issue with key milestones for site editing was also created. For each major milestone, there are related issues for each milestone that are recommended to follow if you want a more granular look at each next step (example from Site Editor Navigation).

As a reminder, if you’re interested in being a part of testing Full Site Editing, check out the experimental outreach program to learn more

Areas to be aware of:

Block & PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Developers:

There’s a new experimental light box wrapper API that allows for a new way to define blocks in order for the markup in the editor to match the front end. While documentation is planned, it hasn’t been written yet. In the meantime though, you can check out the current PRs as this is now ready to be used by plugins: creating edit/save symmetry and stabilizing the API

Theme Developers:

@joen did a wonderful show & tell session including in progress work on a Full Site Editing theme.

Additionally, any theme authors experimenting with Full Site Editing should check out the post from @aristath on a New JSON structure for FSE theme.json files.

Ways to Get Involved:

While the above items are our focuses, don’t forget that you can always help with triage, needs testing issues, good first issues and reviewing PRs. In particular for this month, focusing efforts around testing the Widgets Screen would be very helpful and high impact. 

If there’s anything we can do to make contributing easier, let us know in the comments or in #core-editor chats. While we can’t promise to fix everything, we’d appreciate being aware of any blockers.

Meetings to join:

While you can view all meetings here, here are specific meetings to join depending on your interest. Remember that you need a WordPress.org slack account to participate: 

  • Core Editor weekly @ 14:00 UTC in #core-editor focused on all things Gutenberg. 
  • Widget Sync weekly @ 07:00 UTC in #core focused on triaging and discussing Widget Screen work. 
  • Block Based Themes meeting twice monthly at Wednesday @ 16:00 UTC in #themereview focused on preparing for Full Site Editing. 

#core-editor #gutenberg-next