Call for participants: Diverse Speaker Workshops July & August

The Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) is holding workshops this summer to support diverse voices to share knowledge and stories at online WordPress meetups and WordCamps.

This is a reminder about the July workshops next week and an announcement about the workshops in August.

Workshop: Who am I to be speaking? & Finding a topic that people would love to hear

Tuesday, July 28 @ 5-6pm UTC
Tuesday, August 18 @ 5-6pm UTC

Do you identify as part of a marginalized or underrepresented group in WordPress? Are you intrigued at the thought of speaking at a WordPress event online but are thinking things like, “What would I talk about?” “I’m not an expert, who would want to hear from me?”

In this workshop, we will dispel some myths about being a speaker and answer your questions about speaking. Together we will work on overcoming the thought, “But I’m not an expert in anything”.

Via hands-on exercises and small group discussions, we will help you come up with topics and show you how to choose one. Everyone has something they can talk about – let’s find yours.

Workshop: Creating a great pitch

Wednesday, July 29 @ 5-6pm UTC
Wednesday, August 19 @ 5-6pm UTC

Do you identify as part of a marginalized or underrepresented group in WordPress? Do you want to submit a talk to a WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. or WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. but aren’t sure how? Or you know how and want to work on writing a pitch that has a better chance of being accepted?

Together we will write a meetup description or WordCamp pitch for your talk. This also doubles as helping you start to write your talk!

Prerequisite: Please come with an idea for a talk. If you don’t have one, then please make sure you attend the workshop on Tuesday!

Workshop: What if someone asks me a difficult question? (new!)

Thursday, July 30 @ 5-6pm UTC

This addition to our series is by request!

Do you identify as part of a marginalized or underrepresented group in WordPress? Do you feel nervous about being asked tricky questions at your WordPress talk?

With events moving online, there has been a wider audience. As a result, some of the questions during the Question and Answer (Q&A) period at online meetups and WordCamps have been harder for presenters to answer or even off-topic.

We will discuss strategies for answering and give you scripts you can use for these and other tricky questions. We may also practise, if there is time.

Workshop: Online Stage Presence

Thursday, August 20 @ 5-6pm UTC

Do you identify as part of a marginalized or underrepresented group in WordPress? We would like to help you with public speaking online.

Speaking online is not the same as speaking on stage! Some important items cross over, and there are also differences. We will give you tips for public speaking and being on camera. We will be making the improvements together in the call.

Open Practise Sessions

Tuesday, August 25 @ 5-6pm UTC
Thursday, August 26 @ 5-6pm UTC

This is open practise time for you! There will be no prepared lessons.

Examples of what you can use this time for:

  • Practise parts of your presentation in a supportive space
  • Get feedback on your topic, pitch, or any other part of your presentation
  • Ask your questions about public speaking, applying to speak, etc.

Attending previous workshops are recommended but not required to attend these practise sessions.

You are encouraged to attend all 3 workshops in a week and one practise session, but you are also welcome to attend only the events you wish.

Tickets for July: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wordpress-diverse-speaker-workshops-july-2020-tickets-111846987350

Tickets for August: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wordpress-diverse-speaker-workshops-august-2020-tickets-114603750904

P.S. Others who like to attend these sessions because you want to learn how to be a good ally, please note that this is a closed workshop for members of marginalized or underrepresented groups only. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion material is not covered in these workshops. If there is enough interest, we could hold a different workshop for you in the future.

We do have a few resources available for you: Building A Diverse Speaker Roster, Inclusive and Welcoming Events, and (new!) Encouraging Diversity in Meetups and WordCamps.

#wpdiversity, #wpdiversityworkshops

Building community beyond events

The recent discussion around reimagining online events has raised some challenges in bringing WordCamps online and has suggested some really interesting alternatives for WordPress community organisers to try out. This kind of discussion is not unique to the WordPress community — groups all over the world have been struggling to adapt their in-person events to an online platform.

The WordPress community must keep iterating on effective ways to share valuable content that will help people learn to use and contribute to WordPress.

Moving beyond synchronous events

Since the day this team was formed, events have been our primary tool to grow the WordPress community, helping people learn to use and contribute to WordPress. Events can be an effective way to work toward that goal, because learning in a shared space, with like-minded people, can foster a feeling of belonging which helps people stick with WordPress even when things get rough. 

However, building community through events brings limitations. If someone can’t attend our events, due to geography, schedules, or other barriers, then they are left out. We approach this challenge by trying to foster community in as many places and events in as many times and locations as possible (Whew!). Thousands of people contribute to this amazing effort.

Online events greatly reduce how geography limits the reach of our events (yay!), but the limitation of synchronous events remains. If someone can’t attend the hangout or Zoom at 6pm, then they’re mostly out of luck.  Also, our organising work is less efficient than it could be, with multiple speakers/organisers sharing content about the same subjects in different locations all over the globe. 

Currently, if someone wants to learn more about WordPress from WordPress, they have a few options:

  1. Read some documentation.
  2. Find a local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. or WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more., and hope the topic that they want to learn shows up in the schedule.
  3. Watch WordPress.tv or YouTube and hope that they understand the presentation on the topic (if there is one). 

What if there was another way?

Proposal: Recorded workshops + synchronous discussion groups

The most efficient way to reach the largest number of people and help them learn how to use and contribute to WordPress, is with recorded workshops that can be viewed whenever someone has the time and interest. Recorded talks or workshops make learning available to everyone in the world, no matter what timezone they’re in, what schedule they follow, or when they discover an interest. 

But as we all know, synchronous discussions are incredibly powerful. They facilitate connection, mutual learning, exchange of ideas, and personal development. 

What if we blended those two elements into a program that provides the flexibility of online content, with the value and sense of community that comes with learning together?

We could publish workshops in a central location (on wordpress.org, for better visibility and reach) and then invite learners to join live discussion groups that cater to different timezones. This “flipped classroom” model allows people to learn at their convenience, and then come together for additional development. 

The workshops could be put together by people who would otherwise be speaking at WordCamps, and we could even use existing content from WordPress.TV or talks that are being given at online meetups. There is also potential for longer courses, composed of multiple workshops, and a group that meets repeatedly over time. 

Once the discussion group or workshop is complete, the discussion group leader could recommend that the learners check out their local community groups for more WordPress learning and camaraderie. 

This approach has the potential to grow WordPress as a platform, and support our mission of helping people learn to use and contribute to WordPress, in an exciting new way. 

Feedback

If you agree that this idea is exciting, or if you have a question or suggestion, please leave a comment on this post! Here are some specific questions to get you started:

  1. Have you seen a workshop in the past year that you’d recommend to be included in a first iteration of this program?
  2. What topics would be important to include in an initial offering of workshops?
  3. Are you interested in helping to develop content for a program like this, or reviewing proposed content for accuracy? 
  4. Would you be interested in leading a discussion group for a workshop, or training discussion group leaders?

Moving forward with online events

Thanks to everyone who participated in the discussion about reimagining online events last week! It’s inspiring to see so many people willing to embrace the opportunity that this global crisis brings, and diving in to find better ways for the Community Team to succeed at our mission. 

Discussion summary

Some of the ideas shared included: WordPress video watch/discussion parties, panels, workshops, trainings, language-specific events, topic or vertical based events, television program or news formats, events for underrepresented groups, online contributor days or contributor team events, social events, and Q&As.

There was general consensus on the question of length, with a suggested limit of 2-3 hours per day, as well as support for not using the term “WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more.” to describe our online events any longer. We think these are both smart moves, though of course we’ll need to figure out what to do about naming the events currently being organized. But that’s probably another post. 

Our foundational mission and nonessential expenses

It’s important to respond to uncertainty or change from a point of stability, so we want to highlight that the mission of the Community Team is to help people learn to use and contribute to WordPress. We further this mission by connecting WordPress enthusiasts and inspiring people to do more with WordPress.

As WordPress community organizers, all of our work should support this mission. When we’re considering whether to spend money on something, we make wiser decisions when we consider whether that expense is necessary to achieve the mission. 

As we move away from all-day online events, there is less need to pay professional vendors to help produce our content. Considering the program’s financial situation, it seems wise to end programmatic support for online AV vendor expenses. 

WordCamps with a date on the schedule or under budget review, that planned their events with the understanding that they’d be working with a professional vendor should be able to go forward as planned. Those that have not yet reached the budget stage, and have no signed contracts with vendors, should pause and reconsider whether they really, really need a professional AV vendor to effectively share content with an online audience. 

If it’s necessary to hire a professional vendor for an online event component that furthers the mission, then opening a call for sponsor(s) is the best way to cover that cost. 

Likewise, we have paused plans to spend money on sending swag, T-shirts, or other typical WordCamp collateral.  It’s important to change our frame of reference for what’s necessary to make online events, away from the WordCamp model. Just because we did things a certain way for WordCamps, doesn’t mean it’s a high priority for online events.

Sponsorship

We are in an experimental event space for the first time in many years.

Our sponsors have been with us every step of the way in this challenging year, and it’s important not to ask their financial support for nonessential expenses. The value proposition of online sponsor booths is shaky, and we’ve always prided ourselves in partnering with our sponsors. Looking ahead, we must examine how much funding we need to create events that meet the goals of the team, and let that determine how to best coordinate with our community sponsors to deliver value and further our mission.

It’s also impossible to provide the kind of stability that underpins Global Community Sponsorship right now.  The 2020 program will be suspended for now, and later this year there will be a call for a working group to re-examine its potential for 2021. We’ll work with global sponsors to manage the transition gracefully. 

Experiments and measuring success

Experiments are exciting and important, because they help us go beyond what we thought was possible. But if we’re going to try new things, it’s equally important to identify whether or not the experiment was a success. We’ve used a standard attendee survey for a while now in WordCamps, which is probably too long for shorter online events and doesn’t do much to help us identify whether or not participants learned what they hoped to learn, in a session or workshop. 

Since learning is part of our coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. mission, it seems wise to create a different survey for online event organizers to use in assessing an event’s success. The pre- and post-workshop surveys used by the Diverse Speakers Workshop could be a very successful template.  If you’re interested in helping with the effort to create a survey template that any WordPress community organizer can use, please leave a comment on this post! 

It’s also great when organizers share their observations about what’s compelling and what didn’t work as expected, so we can all learn from each other. If you have a story of a success or failure you’d like to highlight for the broader community, please join our bi-weekly team chat or, for longer-form shares, request an author’s role on this blog from a community deputy.

Feedback

It’s exciting to see WordPress community organizers rising to the challenge of adapting to new circumstances, even with circumstances as unpleasant as these. If you have any questions or feedback on this post, please share them in a comment below!

Please also comment if you are interested in working on a new attendee survey that online events can share, to compare the success of different event types.

Thank you to those who gave feedback on this post: @angelasjin, @courtneypk, @kcristiano, @hlashbrooke

Tuesday Trainings: Open-source and the GPL in Community Events

It’s #trainingtuesday!

As a local event organizer, you are expected to learn and share the correct knowledge of the WordPress license. While we (or at least most of us) are not lawyers, it’s important to understand the basic rules and philosophy behind the license, because they are closely tied to how we vet anyone for anyone representing WordPress, like speakers, sponsors, and volunteers.

In this document, we’ll explore the ways you and your local MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area./WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. participants can deepen your understanding of the WordPress license to build a stronger community together.

What is the GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples.?

The GPL is an acronym of General Public License. The source code of the software licensed under the GPL is free for anyone to run, study, share/copy, and modify.

Why does WordPress use the GPL?

The short answer is: the license of its predecessor software b2 was also GPL. It’s a “copyleft license” – that means all contributions must also be open sourced.

The WordPress community has fully embraced the GPL not only because it had to, but also because it has benefited from the freedoms the license provides to all users.

Just like how community events are organized by volunteers, WordPress software itself is written and maintained by a team of volunteers. Plugins and themes in the WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ directory are also 100% GPL, allowing authors the freedom to learn from each other’s code and collaborate. This is similar to the way we share how we organize community events and build upon each other’s experience.

WordPress Community’s 100% GPL Rule

One of the requirements for WordCamp organizers is to embrace the WordPress license. Products they distribute or promote need to be 100% GPL or compatible when WordPress-derivative works are involved. This goes the same for the speakers, sponsors, and volunteers at WordCamp.

Meetup organizers are also asked to uphold the principles of the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project, including the GPL. They should keep it in mind when considering co-organizers, sponsors, and hosted venues.

Helping Others Understand the GPL

If anyone asks you for a quick explanation of the GPL, you can always point them to the Bill of Rights section of wordpress.org/about page and explain these “four freedoms”.

Four Freedoms

If they want to learn more, the GPL Primer page in our WordCamp Organizer Handbook is a great resource. The links within the page are also very helpful.

Community Deputy Handbook also has a great resource called “Frequently asked questions about the GPL”.

Some people can get a better grasp of an idea when the information is delivered in a medium other than writing. You can assist them by explaining things using slides and story-telling (e.g. some meetup communities use a short presentation to open every meetup, which includes the four freedoms and how they affect the WordPress ecosystem). Or you can share this video: Matt Mullenweg: WordPress and the GPL.

Misinterpretation happens

It is common to see individuals and businesses make mistakes in understanding the principles of the WordPress community’s 100% GPL rule, such as:

  • Stating their derivative product is under the GPL but add extra clause(s) that limit the four freedoms
  • Choosing a split license and think that complies with the 100% GPL rule
  • Not explicitly indicating any license

It’s wise to have a conversation with them and try to sort out their misunderstandings, instead of seeing them as an enemy or calling it out in public. This may sound surprising, but more often than not, they’ll appreciate your help in correcting their wrong interpretations.

If you are not sure how to confront with others about the license violation, reach out to your mentor or Community Team deputies for assistance.

Translating Resources

If you are involved in a community where many of the members don’t speak English, consider translating the existing resources to communicate the idea.

#gpl, #tuesdaytrainings

Youth Event Working Group Chat Agenda | Friday 24 July

Our next Youth Events Working Group chat is happening Friday, 24 July 2020 at 1400 UTC/ 10am EST. This chat will occur in the Make WordPress Community-Team Slackchannel.

Agenda

  1. Updates from the year
  2. Goals for this year
  3. Needs of the Group
  4. Open Floor Discussion

Come and discuss how you can be involved. We need people to:

  • Research – laws surrounding minors at events globally
  • Writing – arts and crafts documentation, WordPress basics documentation, Parental Resources Documents
  • Video Creation – how to videos for WordPress, how to videos for Parents to get involved with their kids, Encouraging Videos
  • Editing – grammar, spell check, and general flow proof readers/editors

Everyone is welcome. Please attend even if you are not sure how to participate.

If for any reason you can not attend the meeting live but still want to be involved please comment on the post to introduce yourself. Share a bit about your WP background and what area you want to help with.

Please leave a comment of anything else that should be added to the agenda for discussion.

Weekly Updates

Hello to all our Deputies, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. wranglers, and WordPress Community builders! You were probably hard at work this weekend. Tell us what you got accomplished in our #weekly-update!

Have you run into a roadblock with the stuff you’re working on? Head over to #community-events or #community-team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for help!

Reimagining Online Event Sponsorships

As we start reimagining what online events look like, so might we also have to reconsider our sponsorship packages and the perks we offer to our sponsors.

Online events do not incur such a high cost as in person events do, so the requirement to gather large sponsorship funds to make a successful WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. no longer exists. This might mean that WordCamp organizers don’t feel the need to reach out to existing sponsors, and get them involved.

On the other hand, with online events, companies could possibly sponsor many more events worldwide, instead of focusing their sponsorships to local only events. So the possible reach of a sponsor could be wider.

It is important to remember that the option to sponsor a WordCamp has traditionally been with the agreement that sponsors don’t receive any “pay to play” type benefits. So typically sponsor perks have included things like advertising at key locations around the event, and sponsor booths/tables to interact with attendees and hand out swag.

In an online event, this is not possible, so WordCamps have had to adapt. One such example is the option of a Virtual Sponsor booth, where attendees can log in to a virtual room to chat with sponsors. This is something that is already being made available at existing WordCamps.

This is equivalent to offering a sponsor a physical booth/table in the general sponsors area at a WordCamp, typically in a space where attendees are very likely to walk past and therefore interact with sponsors.

The problem with such an option is that, if attendees have to log off the regular WordCamp platform, then go find some other link to the Virtual Booth, the experience becomes arduous and full of friction for the attendee making, it highly unlikely they’ll attend.

This ends up meaning that the Virtual Booth has no real benefit to sponsors, and as such, may opt out of choosing a higher tier sponsor package, that would include such a perk.

This post serves to open a discussion around the concept of sponsorships for virtual WordCamps, how they might need to change to fit into the new world of the all online event, and how we can better marry the needs of sponsors to the needs of attendees, to make an online event successful.

Please leave suggestions/ideas as comments on this post, which I will leave open for one week until Thursday 23 July 2020 at 3:00pm UTC. After that I will filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. the comments in a follow up post, where we can discuss them in detail, with an aim to turn them into an actionable plan for sponsorships of our online events.

Thanks to @hlashbrooke for reviewing this post and making sure I don’t sound foolish 🙂

#events-2, #wordcamps

Supporting Black Voices in WordPress

The Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) has received a lot of questions lately about how to feature more Black voices on WordPress stages right now. 

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. Don’t pressure people to step up. It’s an incredibly challenging time right now, and people may not be available or have the emotional and/or physical capacity to do anything extra right now. 
  2. Recognize those who are feeling especially motivated to start sharing their voice more right now. Now and always, yes, you should be featuring people who want to.
  3. Welcome people who are interested in learning or participating, but who aren’t quite ready for getting on stage just yet. It’s great to think about the future!

What can you do?

  1. When inviting a potential speaker, be sure to highlight their specific contributions to the community, or ask if they have great stories to tell about something they learned. (See https://make.wordpress.org/community/handbook/wordcamp-organizer/planning-details/speakers/building-a-diverse-speaker-roster/#speakers-think-they-have-nothing-to-talk-about.) Don’t just invite them on the basis of being Black, as that is tokenizing.
  2. Make sure that whenever the person is ready to start speaking, now or later, everyone who helps them in their speaker journey will be welcoming and encouraging, particularly your meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. speaker wranglers.
  3. Make sure that Black speakers receive all of the same perks as your speakers of well-represented groups. This mistake is accidental, but it happens.
  4. Start including Black people in your leadership, particularly in your speaker selection committee. (Keep in mind point #1 about asking based on contributions or potential and not on being Black!) This will help ensure everyone gets a fair shake and people don’t feel tokenized when invited to apply.
  5. It’s ok to add to your invitation something like, “We are aware that our speakers/leadership do not yet reflect the diversity we aspire to, but we are learning that prioritizing diversity is important to make a supportive and welcoming space for all.” 
  6. Be mindful of microaggressions which may deter participation or make people of color feel unwelcome. Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/stephaniesarkis/2020/06/15/lets-talk-about-racial-microaggressions-in-the-workplace/

Was this list helpful? Do you have anything to add?

Community Team Chat Agenda | July 16 2020

Hello Team!

Our bi-monthly Community Team chat is happening this Thursday, 16 July 2020. Meeting times are detailed below. We use the same agenda for both meetings in order to include all time zones.

Asia-Pacific / EMEA friendly: Thursday, July 16, 2020, 11:00 UTC

Americas friendly: Thursday, July 16, 2020, 20:00 UTC

Deputy/Mentor check-in

What have you been doing and how is it going?

P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. posts needing review/feedback

  • WPDiversity Workshops in July: Different this month! – Jillbinder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/02/wpdiversity-workshops-in-july-different-this-month/
  • Proposal: Recognition for event volunteers and attendees in WordPress.org profile – Timi Wahalahti – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/03/proposal-recognition-for-event-volunteers-and-attendees-in-wordpress-org-profile/
  • External Linking Policy – “Commercial blogs” posted by Milana Cap – https://make.wordpress.org/docs/2020/07/06/external-linking-policy-commercial-blogs/
  • Tuesday Trainings: Thoughts on WordCamp Mentorship – Kevin Cristiano – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/07/training-tuesdays-thoughts-on-wordcamp-mentorship/
  • Youth Event Working Group: Call for More Volunteers and New Meeting Time – Sandy Edwards – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/08/youth-event-working-group-call-for-more-volunteers-and-new-meeting-time/
  • Recap of the Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) on June 24, 2020 – Jillbinder – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/08/recap-of-the-diverse-speaker-training-group-wpdiversity-on-june-24-2020/
  • Tuesday Trainings: Signup for the Mentor Roundtable discussion – Cami Kaos – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/09/tuesday-trainings-signup-for-the-mentor-roundtable-discussion/
  • Meetup Organizer Newsletter: July 2020 – Hari Shanker R – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/14/meetup-organizer-newsletter-july-2020/
  • https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/14/tuesday-trainings-mentor-roundtable/ – posted by Cami Kaos

Highlighted P2 posts

  • Reimagining Online Events – Angela Jin – https://make.wordpress.org/community/2020/07/13/reimagining-online-events/

Please add any additional items to this agenda by commenting on this post as needed.

#deputy-chat, #meeting-agenda, #team-chat

Tuesday Trainings: Mentor Roundtable

For this Tuesday Trainings session I was joined by @kcristiano @brandondove @kdrewien @courtneypk and @vizkr for a roundtable conversation on mentoring WordCamps. Whether you’re an active WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. mentor or interested in becoming one there are some words of wisdom here for you. Join us for an hour and find out more.

For more information please check out these links:

Looking for more great training content? 

Check these out!

The WordPress Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) has several workshops coming up to help you in your journey to public speaking at online WordPress events, or for WordPress event organizers to support more diverse speakers at the events you are holding:

Saturday, July 18, 5-7pm UTC: WordPress Meetups: Hold Your Own Diverse Speaker Workshop
Tuesday, July 28: Who am I to be speaking? & Finding a topic that people would love to hear
Wednesday, July 29: Creating a great pitch
Thursday, July 30: (new!) What if someone asks me a difficult question?

#mentors, #mentorship, #tuesdaytrainings