PROPOSAL: An Audit Tool for Learn

As Learn grows, the need for maintaining content in step with WordPress releases also grows. We would like to implement a content audit tool. This will keep the tasks of auditing and then revising content much more manageable.

The Training Team has sought a content audit tool for a number of years. Many of the same requests are still wanted.

With the current workflow of Learn, we’ve revised the list of what would help keep content up to date.

The current workflow:

We are using Edit Flow, which may still be the solution with some enhancements or additional features. Our general content revision process has looked like this:

  • Many users with Editor user role permission to have login-access to content on Learn. 
  • When WordPress has an update, and when the team has the capacity, contributors will manually review each piece of content on the site.
  • Users check a series of Edit Flow Custom MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. Fields to indicate what needs to be updated and another unchecks the box when it is done 
  • Users cannot view all posts that have the same checkmark ticked (like the functionality of viewing all posts with the same tag). 
  • Custom meta is related to the entire post, not noting specific elements such as several screenshots
  • Users with Editor access for auditing have created their own content, not following the lesson plan templates, and published. The team process is to use a template for the content and undergo several reviews before publishing. 
  • Due to the complexity of this process, the team has not made much progress in staying current with feature changes.

Proposed workflow:

  • More specific uses of user permissions, per https://make.wordpress.org/training/2021/05/27/proposal-adding-custom-user-roles-to-learn-wordpress/.
  • Each screenshot, video, and article could have a taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. indicating 
    • The version of WordPress
    • Option of the user interface (show all posts that have the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. selector, or some part of the admin dashboard)
    • A way to note if the outdated content is preserved for historical purposes (not to be updated)
    • Taxonomy would be viewable like tags, allowing an editor to see a listing of all content types of that notation
    • Apply this taxonomy to lessons, workshops, and courses
  • A checklist before publishing that indicates various stages of review and can be modified by admins in an ongoing way without coding
    • Pending Review
    • Spelling/grammar review
    • Technical review
    • SEO review
    • Require that posts are approved by users in a specific role (editors can review updates, admins can review new content to be published)
    • The ability to assign a lesson plan to a “Content Owner” who is different than the author. It can help identify who is currently responsible for that lesson plan.
  • An expiration date. Any content that should be reviewed on a regular basis can have an expiration date that will provide automatic reminders that eyeballs are needed on that content piece. In the Content Audit pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party this can also include email reminders being sent to the Content Owner. It also displays messages on the front end for logged-in users with the proper permissions.
  • Columns are added to the All Posts screen that indicates the Content Owner, Content Status, Notes, and Expiration date. This makes for a very quick overview that contributors could use to identify the highest priority (or low-hanging fruit) from the list of things to be done. Use the review status in the Learn admin dashboard to show stats of lessons needing review, flagged for updates, at various stages of completion. https://make.wordpress.org/updates/2021/02/26/would-stats-dashboards-help-your-team/
  • Nice to have
    • Require featured imageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. (and how to set a featured image on lesson plans)
    • Require ALT Text descriptions
    • Check for any broken and external links (outside WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/)
    • An SEO plugin that will assist with the tone of voice and complexity of reading

Those who have done considerable content auditing, what tools or features have you used? What would make a tool like this easier to implement across several WordPress teams?

A big thank you to @juliekuehl (original audit request), @azhiyadev, and @evarlese for helping to write this proposal.

Leave your ideas below!

#content-audit

Learn WordPress: User Survey & Focus Groups

Learn WordPress has been live since December 2020 and, in that time, the platform has seen solid growth in content and collaborative learning. While there are many plans in place for where the platform is intended to grow, a more structured roadmap needs to be established so that things can move forward with a clear direction in mind.

In order to facilitate this, a thorough analysis and needs assessment of Learn WordPress is underway. This assessment has a few different facets to it, one of which is direct research into what learners and potential learners would like to see, both in terms of content and the learning experience as a whole. In order to gather reliable data with which to work, a survey has been compiled and focus groups will be run. These will help answer questions about what kind of things people want to learn about and how they want to learn.

The survey is anonymous and open for anyone to complete – it will only take a few minutes to go through. You can find it here and fill it out right now: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LearnWordPress. The survey will be open until Friday, 13 August.

The focus groups will be video calls that last for about 1 hour and will include 5-6 people in each one. There will only be a small number of focus groups and people who join them will have no further obligations beyond attending and taking part in the call. You can complete this form to register your interest in being a part of one: https://forms.gle/jdk2qkkvGyszx1SG6. Focus groups will ideally take place during the week of 2-6 August but can be postponed to the following week depending on interest and availability.

These efforts will be the most successful if people with a broad range of skill sets and experience levels take part, so please share the links above (or just this post!) with as many people as possible. The results will be valuable no matter how well people know WordPress – whether they’re interested in using it for the first time, have just started using it, or have been using it for a long time already.


The results of the survey will be published on this blog, along with relevant anonymised data gleaned from the focus groups.

#learn-wordpress

June 2021 Training Team Sprint

The Training team is using the Sprint method to determine what we are working on and to determine our timeframe for delivery.

What is a Sprint?

[Sprints] are fixed length events of one month or less to create consistency. A new Sprint starts immediately after the conclusion of the previous Sprint.

https://www.scrum.org/resources/what-is-a-sprint-in-scrum

Sprint Content on Learn Goals (Lesson Plans)

Theme: How to contribute to the WordPress Project with screenshots and videos (guidelines for how content within screenshots and videos appear).

Think about these with as much consideration toward accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) as possible.

Ideally, these guidelines could be adopted by other teams as well, turned into a video series of workshops, and help onboard others into several parts of the project. Additionally, it lifts needing to maintain this from our team handbook into content on Learn.

Sprint Functionality of Learn Goals

Sprint Team Functionality Goals

Stakeholders Meeting

We missed our goal for February on planning a meeting to kick off stakeholders meetings. These would be cross-team collaboration in the organization of our goals. Ideas have included:

  • Learn Functionality
    • Automattic sponsored contributors to Learn
  • Content Planning
    • Release squad
    • Marketing
    • Docs

July 2021 Training Team Sprint

The Training team is using the Sprint method to determine what we are working on and to determine our timeframe for delivery.

What is a Sprint?

[Sprints] are fixed length events of one month or less to create consistency. A new Sprint starts immediately after the conclusion of the previous Sprint.

https://www.scrum.org/resources/what-is-a-sprint-in-scrum

Sprint Content on Learn Goals

Theme: How to contribute to the WordPress Project with screenshots and videos (guidelines for how content within screenshots and videos appear).

Think about these with as much consideration toward accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) as possible.

Ideally, these guidelines could be adopted by other teams as well, turned into a video series of workshops, and help onboard others into several parts of the project. Additionally, it lifts needing to maintain this from our team handbook into content on Learn.

Lesson Plans

Functionality of Learn Goals

Training Team Goals


You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.

Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

Team Links:

#learn-wordpress, #learnwp, #sprint, #training-team

Learn WordPress Workshop Review Ridealong

A few weeks ago, @courane01 and @webtechpooja shared an idea to host a session where contributors – or potential contributors – could shadow Community team and Learn WordPress contributors in reviewing and vetting workshop submissions. Let’s make that idea happen!

Currently, when someone submits a workshop idea to Learn WordPress, they fill out the workshop presenter application. That application is then reviewed according to the same guidelines that the Community team has developed for WordPress and meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. group applicants. So far, Community deputies vet most workshops – but others are welcome to learn and contribute as well.


On Tuesday, June 29, 2021 at 12:00UTC, we’ll host a Workshop Review Ridealong via Zoom in the #training channel to review a sample workshop submission together. If you’d like to attend, please add a comment to this post!


This ridealong will be an opportunity for Training and Community team members to observe the review process, express interest in helping to review workshops themselves, and also look for opportunities to help improve our documentation to make sure the expectations and standards are clear for anyone who wants to contribute! We’ll also go over next steps and requirements for folks who would like to help vet Learn WordPress workshop submissions after joining.

+make.wordpress.org/community/

#learnwg

Proposal: Adding custom user roles to Learn WordPress

There are many ways to contribute to Learn WordPress. Folks can join via contributing lesson plans to the Training team, organizing workshop-based discussion groups through local meetups, or submitting their own video workshop or course idea.

Some of these efforts happen outside the Learn WordPress website itself – like organizing a discussion group or using a lesson plan with a local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area.. For the most part, Learn WordPress contributors share a common home in learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/

A flowchat of some common ways to contribute to Learn WordPress, including creating workshops, writing and reviewing lesson plans, and leading or attending discussion groups.

Adding a big asterisk that this is by far from a definitive list of ways to contribute, but just some common pathways!

The current set-up

Currently, when someone contributes to Learn WordPress, they’re added to the Learn WordPress site using one of the standard user roles:

  • Administrator
  • Editor
  • Author

Author is primarily used for workshop contributors (i.e., folks who’ve recorded a workshop) and new Training team contributors helping with a specific lesson plan. Administrators are reserved for Training team representatives and Community deputies who need to add new users to the site. Folks organizing contributors days have also been given temporary Administrator access to help with onboarding new contributors.

For everyone else – and for most folks with access to Learn WordPress – Editor permissions are the most common. This is particularly important for Training team contributors, where folks need access to multiple lesson plans to draft, review, and copy edit content

The Learn WordPress Dashboard is robust. There are many options available on the backend for setting up lesson plans, workshops, quizzes, courses, and so on. Many similarly-named things (Lessons and Lesson Plans being one!) can make starting more challenging. Likewise, the Editor role provides a lot of control over the site from the get-go, which can be problematic from a security perspective in the long term.

Proposed new user roles

With all that in mind, I would like to propose two new custom user roles to better fit Learn’s functionality and structure.

Workshop Reviewers: When reviewing Meetup and WordCamp applications, Community Deputies have a custom metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. box to share vetting notes. Sometimes this information is confidential, especially when a proposed application/applicant may not meet the program guidelines. The current workflow for evaluating workshop submissions is very similar to this process, and the Learn siteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. would benefit from a role for workshop reviewers to have access to a confidential meta box for communicating review notes with one another.

Lesson Plan Editors: By default, lesson plans are developed with a series of checks and reviews to help ensure instructional design quality. This means that Training team contributors, including new contributors, need to access and edit multiple lesson plans. This includes folks like Subject Matter Experts, Copy Editors, and Testers. For folks volunteering to draft or review lesson plans, access to the other post types on Learn WordPress is not relevant or needed, but edit access to all lesson plans is.

Feedback needed

In the end, the proposed user roles would look like:

User rolePermissions
AuthorEdit access to specific Workshops
Edit access to specific Lesson Plans
Lesson Plan EditorsEdit access to all Lesson Plans
EditorsEdit access to all Lesson Plans
Edit access to all Workshops
Edit access to course functionality
Workshop ReviewersEdit access to all content types, plus
Deputy-level access to meta field for application vetting
Ability to add new users to the site
AdministratorsFull site access and permissions

It would be really helpful to get feedback on the following specifically: 

  • How does this make contributing easier?
  • How does it make contributing more difficult?
  • Is there a simpler way to achieve the same goals?
  • Do we need to consider where learners/people using the Learn site might fit into these roles?

Big thank you to @courane01 and @azhiyadev for helping to write this proposal, and @hlashbrooke for reviewing.

Agenda for June 1, 2021

Please join us Tuesday, 1 June 2021, 17:00 GMT+1 OR Office Hour  Friday, 4 June 2021, 11:00 GMT+1 in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. WCEU team presentation
    2. Upcoming info
      1. Proposed user roles on Learn
      2. Proposing an audit tool
    3. High Priorities
      1. Handbook
      2. Slides
      3. Wording for non-CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. mentions on Learn
  3. Current work in process
    1. Lessons in the process: (These need to incorporate the lesson plan template, and bump the content into the lesson plan walkthrough)
      1. Setting up a local WordPress Development Environment for Core
      2. Testing a Trac ticket or a Github PR
      3. Trial run on a lesson plan and workshop about overcoming Imposter Syndrom by @lepittenger as part of Web Dev Studios 5FTF to be included in the speaker series.
    2. Lessons ready to be drafted
      1. Use browser dev tools to anonymized info
      2. What other teams have found
      3. How to create a blog post in WordPress 5.x
      4. Using a browser inspector
      5. What to do when you forget your password
  4. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.

Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team creates downloadable lesson plans and related materials for facilitators to use in live environments.

Getting Invovled

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

Team Links:

#agenda, #content-audit, #slides

Proposal to expand the mission of the Training team

When the Training team got started in 2013, it was invited to help WordPress education grow at scale, by creating and distributing world-class lesson plans that anyone could use to teach WordPress and WordPress-related skills. 

Since that beginning, lots of great work has been done. The result is an impressive repository of lesson plans and the site learn.wordpress.org itself. Those lesson plans provide an empowering framework for educating others in live settings — and even help new contributors develop their voice and expertise through workshops, MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. events, and other opportunities for speaking. The team has a lot to be proud of, and a bright future ahead. 

When the team started, the mission was defined this way:

The WordPress training team creates downloadable lesson plans and related materials for instructors to use in live environments.

Learn WordPress has grown considerably since launch, and is well-positioned to accelerate the growth of WordPress by helping people learn to use, extend, and contribute to our open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. CMS. In that same time, the Training team has also grown and adapted.

To expand and improve the instructional content for all users of WordPress, learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ needs contributors with experience in (or passion for) instructional design, discussion group facilitation, learning assessment, and many other aspects of learning or training. 

I propose expanding the mission of the Training Team to include more of that work, focused on the effort to make learn.wordpress.org a high quality, up-to-date WordPress learning platform — much of which the team has already been doing. 

The new mission statement could be something like:

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Feedback?

I’d love to know your thoughts or concerns about this proposed expansion in scope; please share in the comments below!

Deep thanks to @courane01, @evarlese, and @hlashbrooke for their feedback on, and edits to, this proposal.

Recap for Training Team meeting May 18, 2021

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account.)

The agenda for the meeting can be found here.

Attendance: 

@chaion07@ashiquzzaman@courane01@manzwebdesigns, @azhiyadev, @webtechpooja, @oneal, @meher, @gtarafdarr,

Training team wants to better acknowledge the contributions made to the team.  If you have not yet filled out our contact form, please do: https://make.wordpress.org/training/getting-started/contact/

New Member:

Let’s welcome @satsilem @Manobala Selvaraj @Raman verma who have joined training slack channel the last week. The team have a few ways for you to get involved: https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/getting-started/

News:

WCEU presentation: Hauwa and @courane01 submitted a proposal to WCEU on behalf of the Training team.  @Hugh Lashbrooke has expressed interested in helping as well. The gist of it will be to speak about High Level Roadmap high-level-roadmap-to-learning-wordpress-development. If a PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. or JS dev is present, they can advise on all the lessons or series of workshops within. If the presentation and workshop are accepted, your presence during the  WCEU Training Contribution Workshop would be most helpful.

If someone knows one topic deeply, helping sequence that into a series of content may not come naturally to them. That’s where the training team can help outline the ideas.

Current work in process:

@erica and @courane01 will publish the proposed user roles and audit tool.

Scope of Training Team can be found here@andreamiddleton (she/her) will carry this feedback along soon to project leadership for the scope change considered.

These need to incorporate the lesson plan template, and bump the content into the lesson plan walkthrough –

  1. Setting up a local WordPress Development Environment for Core
  2. Testing a Trac ticket or a Github PR
  3. Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

Lessons ready to be drafted:

  1. Use browser dev tools to anonymized info
  2. What other teams have found
  3. How to create a blog post in WordPress 5.x
  4. Using a browser inspector
  5. What to do when you forget your password

Open Discussion:

The training team shared what they work with and how they would like to contribute to the training team.

#meeting-recap

High-Level Roadmap to Learning WordPress Development

Things I’ve heard recently:

  • How do you learn WordPress? In what order should I learn things?
  • Learning WordPress is easy, there are so many resources.
  • Why can’t these senior ReactReact React is a JavaScript library that makes it easy to reason about, construct, and maintain stateless and stateful user interfaces. https://reactjs.org/. front-end devs understand WordPress?

WordPress is versatile and open, as in open-source, and also as in jump in where you want and go as far as you’d like.

When we say “learn WordPress”, that can mean many things:

  • Learn to write a post/page?
  • Learn to manage a site?
  • Learn to create a child themeChild theme A Child Theme is a customized theme based upon a Parent Theme. It’s considered best practice to create a child theme if you want to modify the CSS of your theme. https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/advanced-topics/child-themes/.?
  • Learn to customize with pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party overrides or using plugins to achieve customization?
  • Learn to make a theme from scratch?
  • Learn to make a plugin?
  • Learn to make a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.?
  • Learn to use APIs for a decoupled approach?

When we think about building a website, there are skillsets around

  • Content
  • Design/UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it./UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing.
  • Development (with code)
  • Quality Assurance
  • Front end
  • Back end
  • Full stack
  • DevOps
  • Translation
  • AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility)

At 41% of the internet and growing, there really is a lot to learn. Where you start, and what your own outcomes are can vary. We progress from being a website visitor to using the software and some of us even go on to write code that makes the software. There are so many skills to acquire in that journey.

My favorite myth to dispel is that teaching or learning is easy. Like a final release, things should be free of bugs and intuitively work well. Behind the scenes, a great deal of work happens to provide the user or student with a cohesive learning experience. Likewise, without a roadmap or guidance on what to learn next, you can get lost in a sea of resources.

I’ve had the honor of teaching WordPress in a development bootcamp environment this past year with a focus on front-end development. While getting a good look around at the bootcamp and non-WordPress (or even non-CMS) web developer ecosystem, I frequently encountered roadmaps to learning. Think of the map as a syllabus handed to students, sharing where we are starting and what our goals will include. Yet there are few maps that incorporate WordPress or PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. into the web developer’s learning.

Let’s help folks get started at any point on their journey, and discover any gaps in learning, and provide suggestions on what could be learned next.

This map will hopefully help shape the content on https://Learn.WordPress.org and could be implemented in a more visually organized way of navigating lesson plans, courses, and workshops.

Roughly, here is what I have found. The image may be a bit small, so check https://whimsical.com/embed/EG8T9S7zddbSVhnm85MmDf.

High Level Roadmap to learning WordPress development

I am attempting to get these details and sequences out of my head and into something presentable for others. I welcome feedback, collaboration, and input on these.

Certainly far more can be included into this roadmap that encompasses more details. However, I wanted to pause here to avoid overwhelming folks with too many specifics.

I have incorporated @chanthaboune WordPress Contributor Team Structure and @mapk’s Care and influence: a theory about the WordPress community into the overview.

What’s Missing?

Leave your feedback below

  • Employers, what do you look for in new-hires?
  • Experienced developers, what do you wish you had more guidance around? What is new or emerging that should be included?
  • Aspiring developers, what have you discovered so far?