Project Proposal: Content Localization

Overview

43% of the web is built on WordPress, and this number encompasses millions of people across the world making magic happen online for themselves, their clients, or their communities. With that in mind, it is integral that we have Learn WordPress content that enables and empowers people to get the most out of WordPress no matter what locale they are engaging with it in. This initiative will help us push WordPress beyond 43%.

The goal of the Content Localization project is to increase and expand availability of content on Learn WordPress to a variety of non-English locales by:

  • Creating new non-English locale content through Online Workshops, Courses, Lesson Plans, and Tutorials
  • Increasing non-English locale representation in the Online Workshop MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Group
  • Increasing non-English locale representation in the Training Team
  • Engaging with and bringing in more non-English locales into the Learn WordPress community

By the end of this project we should have the groundwork of a repeatable process that can be iterated upon further as the folks brought in start work to deliver on the goal of this project.

Project DRIsDRI Directly Responsible Individual - the people who are taking ownership or responsibility for a particular project or feature.

Project lead: @piyopiyofox

Project Members: @bsanevans, @courtneypk + volunteers

Project Timeline

Start: September 2022

End: December 2023

Project Objectives

In order to achieve the above mentioned goals and ensure the success of this project, we will need to focus our efforts on the following objectives:

  • Establish the Locale Ambassador role
  • Enlist at least five Locale Ambassadors (one in each target language)
  • Create a workflow of onboarding and how-to guides that take folks through the journey of joining the Training Team to publishing localized content
  • Bring in at least two new Training Team Members from the following locale communities: Spanish, Japanese, German, French, and Italian (These five languages are a starting point based on the most used languages in our stats page)
  • Have localized content show first on the Learn WordPress homepage when someone visits the page in their native locale

A Locale Ambassador is someone who bridges their local community and the Training Team through various initiatives such as, but not limited to: bringing contributors into their training team,  onboarding contributors to the Training Team’s processes and providing language support, creating localized content.

Tasks

The tasks listed here have been separated by categorical work buckets.

Planning

Tasks in this section center around prep work for the Training Team.

Deadline: October 3rd, 2022

  • Share Proposal with Training Team
  • Post project thread on Training Team Blog
  • Assign Faculty or Training Team Members for support

Documentation

Tasks in this section center around creation of onboarding and how-to handbook pages that need to be created to support this initiative.

Deadline: December 23, 2022

  • Being a Locale Ambassador
  • Translating a Tutorial, Course, or Lesson Plan
  • Advertising Learn Content to your local community
  • Engaging the Marketing Team for publication of new locale content on Twitter
  • Engaging the Polyglots TeamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/. for translation assistance
  • Engaging your local community regarding joining Learn WordPress
  • Bringing in Online Workshop Contributors from non-English locales
  • Recruiting Locale Ambassadors

Dev

Tasks in this section center around work that will require a developer to implement.

Deadline: November 30, 2022

  • Enable locale tagging for Courses, Tutorials, and Online Workshops

Please take a moment to comment on this post to share your feedback on this project proposal by Wednesday, September 28th

#WPTranslation Day Sept 30 – Contributor Day

WordPress Translation Day is back. We’re eager to take part in it again.

Last year the team participated by captioning videos on LearnWP.

This year, we’re focusing on translating the content on LearnWP. Thanks to the work @rastaban started at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US Contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/., we’re well on our way to having various locales available.

See: Project Proposal: Content Localization

This event is open to various contributor groups again this year. @majaloncar will be on hand starting at 7UTC to help onboard contributors and various team members will be on hand for 12 hours. We will help folks get added as authors, copy post content into a new post, and translate directly in lesson plans and collect the results of the day. The goal will be to completely translate an item, so contributors might want to work in teams.

When we have completed the translation, we will ask proficient language speakers for a review of the translation.

A Zoom link will be provided here and in the #training Slack channel just before the event begins if you would like to join us for onboarding and co-working.

Priority content to translate:

Lesson Plans:

  1. Pick a topic:
  2. Comment on this post indicating what topic you are working on
  3. Get author access to Learn and begin the translation (work with others to complete a single topic if possible)
  4. Please complete all taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. on the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme., such as versions of WP, and corresponding audiences, and leave a note in Edit Flow at the bottom of the content with the corresponding English topic.
  5. Note your progress on this post at the end of your time with us, and if you intend to do more to get it ready to publish.

Courses

Tutorials

Online Workshop

#wptranslationday

Proposal: Faster Course Development with Video-Based Courses

In order to speed up the development process for new courses, I propose that the Training Team also explores video-based courses with full transcripts, to go alongside the fully text-based courses that have been produced so far. There are a few elements to this that would all need to be implemented simultaneously, so here are some thoughts about how this could look:

Use published tutorials for course content

The coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. of this idea is that courses will effectively become a logical group of tutorial videos strung together in order. This means that, as content is developed, we need to become intentional about creating tutorials with this in mind. The immediate benefit is that course content will be coming out all the time as stand-alone tutorials, and then packaging them into courses will be a faster process that will involve adding content to Sensei and creating assessments. If we could find a way to combine these with lesson plans then that will be a win all round as it would create much tighter cohesion between all content types.

This doesn’t mean all tutorials need to be part of a course – we can and should continue to publish stand-alone tutorials, so that avenue for contribution and content creation will continue to remain wide open. 

Expand tutorials with fully formatted text

One distinct advantage of our current courses is that they don’t lock people into one way of learning – we have multimedia courses that use videos, text, and images. In order to ensure that we don’t only have one way of learning, all tutorials will also include a text version alongside the video. We already have the full transcript published – while we won’t be changing that, it would give us a good starting point for creating the text tutorial and adding screenshots where appropriate. It’s definitely some additional work but well worth it, and it’s an area where it will be easy for new contributors to get involved. It will also greatly enhance all tutorials regardless of the benefits for courses.

Continue maintaining existing courses

The existing courses (plus the ones currently in development) cover the primary areas of WordPress usage and development:

  • Getting started with setup and publishing
  • Building a site with the Site Editor
  • Building blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. themes
  • Developing blocks

I propose that we continue to maintain these courses as they will always be extremely valuable, so we can work that maintenance into our schedule around the time of each major WordPress release – something that is already happening, thanks largely to @courane01. This process must be documented and easily repeatable each time a major releaseMajor Release A set of releases or versions having the same major version number may be collectively referred to as “X.Y” -- for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, and all other versions in the 5.2. (five dot two dot) branch of that software. Major Releases often are the introduction of new major features and functionality. is on the horizon.

Conclusion & Feedback

In practice, this means the tutorials published on Learn WordPress will be available as both video and text, and courses will take significantly less time to produce, as their content will be published while it is being developed. Not only does this make it all available sooner, but it will also more readily allow for more public feedback on the content, and it will make it much easier for new contributors to get involved in the course creation process.

Does this proposal sound reasonable? We can experiment with this approach and continue to iterate on the process.

Proposal for GitHub Process Updates

Overview

Based on the discussions during the August 24th / 30th Supplemental SME Meeting and recent Monthly Faculty Meeting, folks have requested changes to the GitHub Content Development Board’s issue triaging and management. This proposal offers improvement suggestions to the current GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ processes in order to clarify workflows for Faculty and Training Team Members.

General Workflow suggestions

Outlined below is a workflow that folks would like to try going forward:

  1. Subject Matter Experts vet topic ideas for accuracy, relevance, and priority
  2. Vetted topic ideas are then added to the board’s Ready to Create column
  3. The Training Team selects 5-10 Ready to Create items during the sprint planning meeting and adds the sprint milestone to the selected issues 
  4. A Content Creator (Faculty or Training Team member) picks up a task from the Ready to Create column, moves it to the Drafts in Progress column, and creates the content
  5. The Subject Matter Expert who vetted the topic or is an expert in the topic provides guidance / mentorship to the Content Creator as the content is being created
  6. Once the content is in the Reviews in Progress column, an Editor (Faculty or Training Team member) reviews the content
  7. Content is published!

In order to make the above workflow successful, the following additional updates to the GitHub workflow should be considered:

  • Creation of a new project board or utilization of the Discussions GitHub feature to receive new Topic Ideas and vet them ahead of creating GitHub issues for the Content Development project board
  • Creation of new labels:
    • Needs SME review
    • Content CategoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging. (Ex. PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php., GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/, BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Theme)
  • Adopt sprint milestones
  • Have Faculty Administrators check in on issues in progress
  • Create a Topic Idea template

Handbook pages requiring updates

The following handbook pages should be updated with the above proposed changes:

What’s next?

Please comment to share your thoughts on the proposed changes above by Friday September 16th. Once the team is in agreement, we can move to create action items by Monday, September 19th.

Team Profile Badges

Since the team profile badge handbook page is outdated, we are aiming to update it as soon as we can. Below are a few recommendations which we should consider before moving it to the handbook.

If you would like a badge on your WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile that acknowledges your contributions to the Training Team, the following criteria must be met:

  • Team On-boarding (Required) 
  • Training Contributor:
    • Writing – You have developed an approved lesson plan, tutorial and course from scratch or completely rewritten one that was out of date. Your efforts have moved the content from the “Drafts in Progress” stage to the “Review in Progress” stage on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/.
    • Copyediting/Reviewing – You have successfully moved a lesson plan, tutorial and course from the “Review in Progress” stage to the “Published or closed” stage in Github.
    • Testing – You have completed a testing feedback form after using a lesson plan in an event and have updated the GitHub card with any suggested changes.
    • Auditing – You have audited 3 lesson plans or 3 tutorials or one course. Or you have surveyed the teams Learn WordPress GitHub Reposrepos The Training Team uses GitHub for working copies of lesson plans. You can find them at https://github.com/wptrainingteam. and created  5 GitHub issues for any needed functionality changes.
    • Connecting – You have made three tutorial recommendations or course recommendations by combining existing lesson plans and submitting your ideas through the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site.
    • Online Workshops – You have facilitated 3 Online workshops. 
    • Recap Notes – You have written 3 Recap Notes.
    • A significant code contribution to Learn such as adding or modifying features of the theme.
    • Other – the team may choose to award the badge for other contributions at the team’s discretion.
  • Training Team: You have admin rights on GitHub, HelpScout, the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site, and the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site. You assist with final reviews of lesson plans. You regularly contribute to meetings or the maintenance and management of the team. You have been involved for the past twelve months.

Awarding of profile badges: There will be a monthly review of contributions, and badges will be awarded at that time. A list of the new profile badges awarded will then be posted on the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. If you feel that you have earned the badge but were not listed, please leave a comment on that month’s retrospective blog post and include your WordPress.org username.

Post compiled by @courane01@azhiyadev

Looking for feedback: Handbook page about content localization

The Training Team has wanted to make contributing localized content for Learn WordPress easier. As of today, you can now find a page in our handbook that will walk you through both translating existing content, and creating new content in locales other than English!

New handbook page: Content Localization

The workflows listed are a combination of processes currently used by Training Team members, and some new ideas to better track contributions and maintain consistency across translated content. The team is looking for contributors to try these new workflows and help us identify how we can make them even better.

Please share your experience creating localized content for Learn WordPress with these new workflows in the comments of this post. If you have any suggested improvements to the newly created handbook pages, please share those below, too! We will continue to update the processes as we receive feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/polyglots/

#learn-wordpress, #localization

[Discussion] Reimagining the Training Team contributor roles

In this post, I have taken suggestions raised in recent team meetings regarding team onboarding, and present a new idea regarding the Training Team’s contributor roles. The model I propose reimagines the current “roles” of the team as “tasks”, and positions the Faculty members as mentors in 4 areas of expertise (administrator, subject matter expert, content creator, editor) within the team. 

Let’s discuss and see if this model can address the friction our new contributors are experiencing during onboarding.

The Goal

In recent sprint retrospectives (June & July Sprint, August Sprint), the Training Team identified a couple of needs related to our team roles. Here are some points of improvement raised in these retrospectives:

  • Better team role implementation, so new contributors will also have a clear picture of their assigned task(s).
  • Easing the onboarding process for newcomers and beginners.
  • Having a few folks who can focus on sorting GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issues consistently would be beneficial.
  • Increasing membership in the copy editor, reviewer, and auditor roles.
  • Assign a point of contact for new contributors to reach out to in each role.
  • It would be excellent to have onboarding videos/lesson plans for each role.
  • Continue building the handbook so contributors have more precise guidance.
  • Clear guidelines for new joiners, especially for basic and Intermediate-level contributors.

From these points, and other conversations the team has been having, I can see a few common goals we are aiming for:

  1. Improved clarity regarding team tasks
  2. Improved onboarding processes for team roles
  3. A point of contact for each role
  4. Better distribution of contributors throughout roles

An Idea

My idea is to view the 4 areas of Faculty responsibility as areas of expertise in the Training Team. This idea reframes what we’re calling “team roles” right now as “tasks” folks can do within each of those areas.

Four circles with the words administrator, content creator, subject matter expert, and editor in them. Each circle also lists some tasks that would fall into those areas of expertise. The words "Team Reps" connect them all in the middle.
Reimagining the Training Team roles as four areas of expertise

Onboarding pathways (for example courses and/or tutorials) would guide new contributors into each of these areas of expertise. How-to guides in the handbook would be the go-to resource for anyone wanting to complete a task. Contributors wouldn’t have to carry a role specifically. But there would be clear guidance for them to accomplish tasks and contribute to the team’s mission.

Faculty members would be contributors with experience in a specific area of expertise. They’d function as the point of contact for anyone needing help in that area of expertise. They’d also be mentors to other contributors wanting to grow in that area of expertise.

Your Feedback

  • What are your thoughts about this new team role model?
  • Do you see it responding to the areas of improvement raised in the team’s recent retrospective?
  • Are there any points of concern that should be addressed?

Please share your thoughts below. Based on the conversations we have in the comments, I’ll draft some next-steps for the team to consider at the end of the month.

#faculty-program, #roles, #training-team

Meeting Agenda for September 14, 2022

Please join us for our Team Meeting Tuesdays at 07:00 UTC (APAC friendly) OR Tuesdays at 16:00 UTC (AMER/EMEA friendly) OR Coffee Hour Friday at 13:00 UTC in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. Meeting Note Takers
    2. Faculty Members Update
    3. WCUS 2022 Update
    4. August Sprint Retrospective
    5. Proposal for GitHub Process Updates
    6. Course Creation – Making the process public
    7. Training team badges
    8. Looking for feedback: Handbook page about content localization
    9. Other Handbook updates
  3. Monthly Sprint
    1. Progress
      1. Drafts
      2. Reviews
      3. Published
    2. Help Needed
      1. Content
        1. Ready to Create – You Can Help
          1. High Priority
          2. Medium Priority
          3. Quick Fix
        2. Topic Ideas
      2. Website Development
        1. High Priority Issues
        2. Medium Priority Issues
        3. Good First Issues
      3. Training Team Administration
  4. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.


Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

  1. Learn.WordPress.org
    1. Lesson Plans
    2. Tutorials
    3. Courses
    4. Online Workshops
    5. Pathways to Learn WordPress
  2. Getting Involved
    1. GitHub Website Development
    2. GitHub Content Development
    3. What We Are Currently Working On This Month
  3. About The Team
  4. Our Team Blog

#learn-wordpress, #training-team

Meeting Agenda for September 6, 2022

Please join us for our Team Meeting Tuesdays at 07:00 UTC (APAC friendly) OR Tuesdays at 16:00 UTC (AMER/EMEA friendly) OR Coffee Hour Friday at 13:00 UTC in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. Meeting Note Takers
    2. Faculty Members
    3. Individual Learner Survey
    4. WCUS 2022
    5. Summary Update: Courses Currently in Development (1 September 2022)
    6. Launching workshops in additional Locales
    7. Team Structure
    8. August 24th / 30th Supplemental SME Meeting Recap
    9. Monthly Faculty Meeting Recap – August 30/31 2022
  3. Monthly Sprint
    1. Sprint Retrospective (APAC)
      1. What Went Well?
      2. What We Could Improve?
      3. What Will We Do Differently?
    2. Progress
      1. Drafts
      2. Reviews
      3. Published
    3. Help Needed
      1. Content
        1. Ready to Create – You Can Help
          1. Upcoming 6.1 changes
          2. Revisions
          3. High Priority
          4. Medium Priority
          5. Quick Fix
        2. Topic Ideas
      2. Website Development
        1. High Priority Issues
        2. Medium Priority Issues
        3. Good First Issues
      3. Training Team Administration
  4. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.


Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

  1. Learn.WordPress.org
    1. Lesson Plans
    2. Tutorials
    3. Courses
    4. Online Workshops
    5. Pathways to Learn WordPress
  2. Getting Involved
    1. GitHub Website Development
    2. GitHub Content Development
    3. What We Are Currently Working On This Month
  3. About The Team
  4. Our Team Blog

#agenda, #training-team

Documenting the Successful Launch of Japanese Online Workshops

On August 17th and 24th, @piyopiyofox and I co-hosted the Training Team’s first Japanese Online Workshops. These were also the team’s first non-English Online Workshops! The workshops received positive feedback, and we’re already seeing people sign up to the third and fourth workshops happening in September!

This post documents the process we took to plan, publicize, and execute the first non-English Online Workshops. We hope this will give others some ideas as to how they can host Online Workshops in their locales, too!


Preparation

Destiny and I had both previously been vetted as Online Workshop facilitators. Anyone interested in hosting Online Workshops can submit an application here: Applying to facilitate (handbook page). We had also conducted Online Workshops in English, so we were familiar with the general processes behind Planning an Online Workshop.

The process of scheduling the workshop was mostly the same as scheduling English workshops (Scheduling an Online Workshop). A few things we did differently were:

  • Created the meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. event in Japanese: ブロックエディターでホームページを作ろう!(English: Let’s make a homepage with the BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor.)
  • Included information in English that the event would be hosted in Japanese.
    • We added this information to the event thumbnail on Meetup.com, and in the event description itself.
  • We published the event a few weeks in advance so that we had enough time to publicize the event to the Japanese community.

Publicity

People can find out about upcoming Online Workshops in a few different ways:

None of these would get the word to the Japanese community about the workshops, though. So, we took some time to spread the word through other means.

We were particularly excited to see the organic publicity the tweets generated!

Results

We were interested in finding out when the best time to host workshops would be for the Japanese community, so we hosted the workshop twice spaced out over two weeks; both on a Wednesday, but one at 2 PM and another at 5 PM JST. We had a total of 14 people attend the two sessions, with a slightly higher number at the session hosted in the evening over that hosted early afternoon.

The feedback submitted in the Zoom chat was greatly positive with many mentioning they learned something new from the session! We also noticed some attendees tweeted that they had a positive experience in the session.

At the end of the second session, we took time to announce the next Japanese Online Workshops we’ve scheduled for September. This seems to be a success, as one participant mentioned in the session that they would be back, and we see a couple have already signed up to attend! These next sessions are being planned and tracked on the Training Team’s GitHub repository.

Post-session Processes

In English sessions, we generally turn Live Captions on in Zoom, and use these to generate subtitles for the video recording we submit to WordPress.tv. Unfortunately, Zoom does not yet have live caption capabilities in Japanese. While we weren’t able to turn live captions on during the session, we were able to generate good quality subtitles through Sonix.ai after the session concluded. You can now find a recording of the workshop on WordPress.tv: ブロックエディターでホームページを作ろう!

Conclusion

As a team, we are excited about growing the non-English resources we provide on Learn. The experience documented above shows it is possible to host Online Workshops in other languages, too! 

The biggest hurdle we had to cross was publicizing the event to the Japanese community. If you have any ideas as to how we could do this better, we’d love to know!

The Training Team Faculty members are ready to help launch Online Workshops in other locales also. If you are interested in hosting an Online Workshop, come apply to become a facilitator! Faculty members are ready to help you facilitate in your locale, too.

#localization, #online-workshops, #social-learning