X-post: Call for Testing: WordPress for iOS 21.1

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/mobile: Call for Testing: WordPress for iOS 21.1

X-post: Test Team Update: 31 October 2022

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Test Team Update: 31 October 2022

Hallway Hangout: Discussion on wrapping Phase 2 (26 Oct)

This is a summary of a Hallway Hangout that was wrangled in the #fse-outreach-experiment channel as part of the FSE Outreach Program. Thank you to everyone who joined in!

Attendance: Rich Tabor, Damon Cook, Courtney Roberston, Paal Joachim Romdahl, Jeff Ong, Nick Diego, Vagelis, Sé Reed, Piermario Orecchioni. 

Video Recording:

Topics:

The main topic centered around the work underway to wrap phase 2 gathered in this overview issue. Expect regular updates to this issue and know that other work will continue but there’s a big emphasis to complete the tasks outlined there. 

As of last week, the following was in place:  

  • Work has been completed (1)
  • Dev work is underway (9)
  • We’re in the design stage still (3).
  • Dev is assigned but hasn’t started (3).
  • Means work is stuck but there’s follow up to try to get unstuck (1).
  • Means work is stuck, either due to a problem or a time lapse of 14+ days, and unclear how to unblock (11).

From there, we dug into the following individual issues to chat through at a high level what we were seeing. At a high level, it stuck out to folks how many different explorations there are, conflicting designs at times, etc. By doing this work concurrently, these differences can be resolved and the solutions refined together. 

Introduce “Browser” and surface main navigation UI

We talked about how this was a change in the entrance to the site editor just as much as it was for navigating between content. There was a desire to be able to click on the site title in the nav component to take you to the front end of the site. We discussed the important of accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) testing for this change and it’s top of mind to test for the FSE Outreach Program. 

Global styles: Offer a way to view a document containing all blocks and styles

  • Overall, this would be a great way to get a sense of how changes impact the entirety of the site and in creating a more unified approach. 
  • When looking at this issue, various folks commented on how it feels like there’s a number of different modes and it isn’t always clear how they relate and don’t relate. Part of this is due to designs being in progress at various stages and including some work but not others. 
  • We chatted about how the IA needs to improve around right/left sidebars. Is there a best practice for when to put things in left vs right sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. in the design library? Are we at a critical point in that convo right now? What about RTL when it comes to moving where things “live”? 

Make it possible to push local block styles to global block styles

  • This was noted as something that’s likely for more advanced folks but still very handy.
  • There are some tricky things to figure out since the styles pushed would have to be supported within GS.
  • It also requires a site to be built in a certain way to work since there’s some complexity around the specificity of global styles. 

Using the template editor for plugins

  • We talked about plugins using the template editor (example from Woo) and how the template editor doesn’t have access to global styles, leading to viewing Consider exposing the Styles UI for classic themes using theme.json.
  • We discussed what consolidation of the various editors might look like and how the current work seeks to make everything more unified, with the option to edit content in the site editor for example. 

Media library getting the “FSE treatment”

Feedback on the Quick Inserter prioritizing patterns in certain circumstances 

  • We discussed some pain points around when the quick inserter prioritizes patterns, especially the struggle to be able to add a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.!
  • Talked about having it be a user preference to start with blocks vs patterns. 
  • There are generally two different mindsets when working with blocks vs patterns. 
  • Could the slash inserter work with patterns? There’s already an open issue here

Other topics and questions

Folks shared that responsiveness is still a big topic along with navigation block. Multiple people echoed both. Damon shared in the chat: “The Navigation block has SO much complexity, but tackling the challenges will likely surface many great ideas that can be rolled out to other blocks that have complete UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing./interaction”. Finally, we chatted at the end about the history of the Query LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. block naming (why not loop?), where folks can report issues when 6.1 is out in the wild, and what’s next for the FSE Outreach Program.

#fse-hallway-hangout

X-post: Test Team Update: 24 October 2022

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Test Team Update: 24 October 2022

X-post: Call for Testing: WordPress for Android 21.0

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/mobile: Call for Testing: WordPress for Android 21.0

X-post: Call for Testing: WordPress for iOS 21.0

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/mobile: Call for Testing: WordPress for iOS 21.0

X-post: Test Team Update: 17 October 2022

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Test Team Update: 17 October 2022

FSE Program Guiding the Gutenberg Gallery Summary

This post is a summary of the seventeenth call for testing for the FSE outreach program. As always, I want to highlight those who helped to bring others along with them in this latest effort: 

Finally, thanks for the patience as this recap took a bit more time to get done, due to balancing other responsibilities with 6.1. 

High-level summary

In many ways, this post could be split equally between the zoomed out view and navigation blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. as that’s where much of the focus of feedback is centered. To make it easier to see the emphasis on zoomed out view and navigation block in the feedback from folks, each item of feedback has been clearly labeled. 

In general, the zoomed out view proved to be seen as a high value add with folks immediately appreciating the value when switching between style variations and only a few bugs/enhancements found. It’s clear that, in time, having this view invoked contextually when doing things like changing style variations or adding patterns will be advantageous to the site editing experience when you need a way to see a broader view. 

In terms of the navigation block, feedback underscored that it remains clunky to use. With this test focused on theme switching it highlighted that, while 6.1 brings huge strides in terms of fallbacks, work remains to be done even for basic site switching experience. Due to the complexity of the navigation block, various issues surrounding using the block itself were also noted including overlap issues when managing sub-menu items, a desire to have a more dedicated way to quickly alter the structure of the menu items, and confusion around the “double click to edit” experience that prioritizes selecting a container block rather than inner blocks at first.

Beyond these two buckets of feedback, some high level items remained including a need to properly migrate widgets to block themes as that’s a key part of the experience currently lacking that causes content loss. Tied to this, various pain points in style switching, a big part of Twenty Twenty-Three, were noted including a lack of clarity around how changes to a style variation wipes out previous manual edits to styles and a delay in the changes to a style variations appearing on the front end of a site. More simply, this test also showed how opening up access to edit these parts of your site also requires a more streamlined way to make common changes, like changing basic colors (background) in a new template, without impacting the entire site. 

O that is very very nice! I like being zoomed out and viewing the page while clicking the various styles! It gives a really nice overview!

@paaljoachim in this comment.

I feel like novice users likely don’t know the implication of what will change with their theme. They might assume that the colors/styles may change, but not necessarily structural changes (like having to re-do the menu). I wonder if there is some way to give users (maybe just those that haven’t switched themes before) some more information about this.

@clubkert in this comment.

Adding a way to edit the menu via a drag and drop interface in a modal window or something would be nice, precise clicking and adding submenus was tricky for me, whereas the WordPress standard way of editing menus is quite easy to work with.

@chopinbach in this comment.

I noticed that when I switched from Twenty Twenty One to Twenty Twenty Two the navigation changed and lost the previous menu. That’s unexpected and not great.… When clicking on manage menus, I was actually hoping to find the old menu interface where I could easily drag and drop menu items, add classes, and enable different items still not shown in the menu (Product categories, languages, etc.). My dreamy dream wish would be to select a menu in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. and be shown the “classic” editing interface for that menu, right away…Menus were one of the ways I often used to wow friends and customers about how simple WordPress menus were, and even newbies would get it right away. Coming from Joomla! Everybody was pretty impressed in a positive way.The block menu system still often feels like a collection of somewhat unrelated blocks, that won’t even update links when page slugs are changed. The menu experience really feels needlessly clunky and not intuitive to me. I wonder how new users feel about it.  

@piermario in this comment (merged a few different lines).

For any folks who want to watch a group go through this experience, check out the following video:

Confirmed Bugs

The following bugs were found in the current experience, some of which have already been fixed: 

When selecting a pattern from the footer categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging., it gets added as Group. When it’s just a Group, the Replace functionality is not available. In order to use the Replace functionality, you have to first add a Footer block and then select one of the footer patterns from there. I guess this can be confusing for some people expecting to see the Replace menu item, when there is none.

@luminuu in this comment.

Feature Requests 

It’s important to note that most folks mentioned wanting to see a different icon for the zoomed out view. In the issue introducing this feature itself, the icon was a topic of conversation but, in the long term, this isn’t truly meant to be a “standalone” tool to toggle on/off. Rather, it’s meant to be a view that is embedded intuitively throughout the experience. To get a sense of what that might look like, here are two examples where this mode would be “invoked” while taking specific actions where the view is most helpful: when the patterns tab is open in the Inserter and when switching between style variations. For this reason, an issue was not open. 

Continuing to do work that improves the “out of the box” default options of the navigation block remains incredibly valuable, from better fallbacks to preventing accidental duplication of imports. 

Zooming worked well to see what was there. I was able to insert new sections or patterns. I could also rearrange sections. I was not able to replace or delete any sections. (Not sure if that’s an option yet.)

@antigone7 in this comment.

When I edit the template in zoomed out mode and have selected a Group block or HeaderHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes./Footer via the List View, the blue lines surrounding the selected group are very thin and almost not visible.

@luminuu in this comment.

When I switched, the home page title showed up (where it wasn’t there before), the menu changed, and my twitter feed was now gone (that I had added to the footer).

@clubkert in this comment.

General Usability

Much of the usability feedback came in around the zoomed out view and navigation block. For the zoomed out view, there was a desire for more functionality, from a way to control how much zoom occurred to being able to take action on each section (delete/swap/etc). Rather than opening individual issues for these items, this recap is going to rely on the current designs that include these items for consideration with comments left on the main issue. For the navigation block, the feedback heavily indicated that the current experience of controlling and rearranging menu items is still too difficult, especially when a “convert to links” step has to happen. There are numerous efforts in progress to ease this from a way to edit the navigation in isolation to an editable “list view” style mode in the block settings.

Click once to zoom a specific amount of percentage and click again to zoom out even further. So that one can choose between two zoom modes of how far out one views the page from.

@paaljoachim in this comment.

Repeatedly one click on the Navigation did not do anything. I had to double click it.

@paaljoachim in this comment.

If I change the styles manually (colors, etc.) then switch to a different style variation, there is no way to get back to my previous version. There is also no warning that I will be losing all of my hard work.

@clubkert in this comment.

It would be nice if the Navigation Menus in the top right of the toolbar allowed you to edit the items or if you could open a modal window to quickly edit the structure of the menu that would be easier.

@chopinbach in this comment.

Yay! Header and Footer patterns is one of the things I’ve been trying to discover, but I could never really find where this task could be done. So yay for the world of design options this feature opens, but unfortunately not so yay for the discoverability of this feature, which I find very interesting and fun.

@piermario in this comment.

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-summary

Week in Test: 15 October 2022

Hello and welcome to Week in Test, the place where contributors of any skill level can find opportunities to contribute to WordPress through testing. You can find the Test Team in #core-test.

Jump to: Calls for Testing | Weekly Testing Roundup | Profile Badge Awards | Read/Watch | Upcoming Meetings

Calls for Testing 📣

Calls for Testing can originate from any team, from themes to mobile apps to feature plugins. The following posts highlight features and releases that need special attention:

Help Test WordPress 6.1 🌟

6.1 RC1 was released on Tuesday, and is available for testing. See the 6.1 Call for Testing post for a rundown of major new features and tips for testing. Prereleases of 6.1 will be available until its official release the first week of November, so please test and provide feedback before 1 November 2022.

Call for Testing: Plugin Dependencies

Have you ever gotten stuck installing a fancy new pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, and then spent two days in support forums just to find out that you needed to install another required plugin to get it working? Or are you a plugin author who would like to bundle plugins for a smoother setup experience for your users? Plugin Dependencies is here to help! See the Plugin Dependencies call for testing, and provide feedback before 1 December 2022. #feature-project

Weekly Testing Roundup 🤠

Here’s a roundup of active tickets that are ready for testing contributions.

Did you know that contributions with the Test Team are also a fantastic way to level up your WordPress knowledge and skill? Dive in to contribute, and gain coveted props 😎 for a coming release.

Reproduction Testing 🔁

Who? Any contributor.
Why? It is helpful to show an issue exists for other users in order to move a ticket forward for patching.

The following new tickets are awaiting review, and need testers to attempt to reproduce the reported issue (aka “repro”), and then provide a reproduction test report with the results:

  • #56768: Base64-encoded images render in editor, but not frontend.
  • #56789: Toolbar: .screen-reader-shortcut does not have background color until focused.

Patch Testing 🩹

Who? All contributors (not just developers) who can set up a local testing environment.
Why? It is necessary to apply proposed patches and test per the testing instructions in order to validate that a patch fixes the issue.

The following tickets have been reviewed and a patch provided, and need testers to apply the patch and manually test, then provide feedback through a patch test report:

  • #55990: Twenty Twenty: Pullquote BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.: Add Citation Text Color Issue.
  • #48244: script-loader.php: Use _n() when multiple results found.
  • #56388: Remove unnecessary comments from compiled block styles.
  • #56802: Query: Post IDs cached for search and other ‘LIKE’ queries are unreachable.

PHPUnit Tests 🛟

Who? Any QA or PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. developer contributors who can (or are interested in learning how to) build automated PHPUnit tests.
Why? Automated tests improve the software development feedback loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. for quality and backward compatibility.

The following 6.2 tickets need PHPUnit tests built to accompany their respective patches:

  • #47164: map_deep in formatting.php does not handle null-byte.
  • #55290: Not all image edits are applied to all subsizes.
  • #56340: Resolve PHP 8.1 E_DEPRECATED in PasswordHash::gensalt_blowfish.

Profile Badge Awards 🎉

Thank you to the following contributors who have earned the Test Contributor profile badge. These users have participated in WordPress 6.1 betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. release parties, as well as performed general testing over the past few weeks:

Read/Watch 📖

Upcoming Meetings 🗓

Interested in hosting a <test-scrub>? Test Team needs you! Check out Leading Bug Scrubs for details, or inquire in #core-test for more info.

#build-test-tools, #core-test, #feature-plugin, #feature-project

X-post: Call for Testing: Plugin Dependencies

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/core: Call for Testing: Plugin Dependencies