Early opportunities to Test WordPress 6.6

Ahead of betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1, let’s get testing for 6.6! What follows below are items pulled from the 6.6 roadmap that are ready for feedback and to be explored. The steps below are meant to kick off exploring and testing rather than to be overly prescriptive so please test further. Expect a more comprehensive post to come when we reach the beta period and more features are ready. To learn more about each feature, please refer to the 6.6 roadmap as this post is dedicated to testing items rather than explaining them in full. 

Testing setup

For testing each of these items, you can either use this Playground link to get started quickly or  set up your own test site with the latest version of GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ and the noted experiments below enabled.

Data Views

Data Views is the new and improved experience of navigating and viewing information in the Site Editor as part of the groundwork for phase 3. This release focuses on bringing a new side by side layout, consolidating patterns and template part management, surfacing general management views sooner across the experience for easier access, and a wide range of refinements. 

Testing instructions

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select Pages.
  2. In this view, you’ll see the new layout called “list” that shows a side by side view. 
  3. Underneath “Add New Page” select the View Options icon. 
  4. Change the layout of the view by selecting “Layout” and explore changing other options, like sort by or what fields are displayed. 
  5. Click the back arrow to return to the overall Design section and select “Templates”.
  6. Underneath the “Add New Template” select the View Options icon. 
  7. Change the layout of the view by selecting “Layout” and explore changing other options, like sort by or what fields are displayed. 
  8. Click the chevron back arrow to return to the overall Design section and select “Patterns”.
  9. Explore creating new patterns and template parts before exploring how the two are presented in the same section. For example, view the “All template parts” and “All patterns”, try using different sorting options, and different layouts. 

You can continue testing as you see fit by creating different types of content (patterns, template parts, templates, and pages in various states) and changing how that content is then displayed in each management section (Patterns, Templates, Pages). 

Overrides in synced patterns

Building upon the power of synced patterns, overrides allow you to ensure a synced layout and style across patterns while enabling each instance of the pattern to have customized content. This provides consistency in design across different pieces of content. For instance, consider a user creating a ‘Recipe’ pattern. With the enhanced feature, the user can insert this pattern into multiple posts, ensuring that the layout and styling components, such as the overall design of the recipe card, remain consistent across instances. Meanwhile, the content, such as Ingredients and Steps, would be local to each post, allowing for individual customization. Additionally, folks would then be able to revisit and modify the design of the recipe pattern without affecting the content in existing instances.

Testing instructions

Create a synced pattern with overrides

  1. Create a new post.
  2. Insert a mixture of blocks that include paragraphs, headings, buttons, images, and optionally other blocks too.
  3. Select the blocks, and ‘Create a pattern’ from the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. options menu.
  4. Give the pattern a name and make it ‘synced’.
  5. Once the pattern has been created, note that the content is locked and uneditable.
  6. Click the ‘Edit original’ button on the toolbar, this will take you into an isolated view for editing the pattern.
  7. Select a paragraph block in the pattern, and in the block settings sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. expand the Advanced section. Check the ‘Enable overrides’ option and give the override a name.
  8. Set overrides for a few blocks within the pattern, ideally including a heading, paragraph, button, and image block.  
  9. Use the ‘Back’ button in the headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. area of the editor to go back to the post.

Editing the instances

  1. Select the pattern and duplicate it.
  2. Now click the paragraphs for which you checked ‘Enable overrides’ and notice you can edit them. The updates don’t sync across instances of the pattern; the changes are local to the pattern.
  3. View the post, the frontend should match the editor.

Add the pattern with overrides to another page

  1. Create a new page and add the newly created pattern with overrides to it.
  2. Make local changes to the pattern based on what blocks are able to be overridden. 
  3. Hit save when done.
  4. Click the ‘Edit original’ button on the toolbar, this will take you into an isolated view for editing the pattern.

Remove override option

  1. Select one of the blocks with overrides turned on and in the block settings sidebar expand the Advanced section.
  2. Select “Disable overrides” and confirm your choice in the warning modal (read the modal and give feedback!). 
  3. Select save and use the ‘Back’ button in the header area of the editor to go back to the page.
  4. Confirm you can no longer edit the previous override that was just disabled and that the content matches the original pattern once more.

Zoom out view

A few different initiatives are coming together to allow one to focus on building with patterns rather than granular block editing, including advancing contentOnly editing and zoomed out view. Taken together, this work aims to offer a first step towards a new way to interact with and build with patterns. What follows below are ways to test and invoke this new zoomed out view. 

Testing instructions

Explore zoomed out with Style variations

  1. Open Appearance > Editor to open the Site Editor.
  2. Select the canvas to begin editing the blog home template.
  3. Open Styles and select “Browse styles” to open up the various style variation options. This will cause the zoom out view to automatically appear. 
  4. Scroll through different style options and explore what it’s like to enter and leave the zoomed out view (turn on/off the Style book, style blocks and return to the variations, etc). 

Build with patterns

  1. Click the chevron back arrow to return to the overall Design section. 
  2. Select Pages and “Add new page” to create a new page.
  3. Give the page a title and select “Create draft”.
  4. Close out of the pattern selection modal.
  5. Open the Inserter and navigate to the Patterns tab. 
  6. Go through different categories of Patterns and notice that upon viewing a specific categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging., the canvas is zoomed out for a broader view.
  7. Add a few patterns to the page. Remember that you can drag and drop a pattern or click to add. 
  8. Click the chevron back arrow to return to the Manage pages section and edit a current page with content (you may need to create this). 
  9. Open the Inserter and navigate to the Patterns tab to explore adding a pattern to current content (are you able to place it where you want?). 

Unified and refreshed publish flowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context

The publish flows for both the post and site editor have been unified, bringing with it a new design and experience. Because publishing is such a critical part of the WordPress experience, it’s a key part to explore and find the edges of. 

Testing instructions

Create a page in the Site Editor

  1. Open Appearance > Editor to open the Site Editor. 
  2. Select Pages and “Add new page” to create a new page.
  3. Add some content and publish the page by changing the options in Block Settings under Page. 
  4. Please test further by adding a featured imageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts., changing the author, changing the date, etc. 

Create a post with the Post Editor

  1. Open the command palette with either Cmd+k on Mac or Ctrl+k on Windows and type “Add new post” before selecting the option that matches. 
  2. This will take you to a new post in the Post Editor.
  3. Repeat the process of adding some content and publishing.  
  4. Please test further by adding a featured image, changing the author, changing the date, adding categories, adding tags, setting an excerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox., etc. 

You can continue testing as you see fit by going through the publish flow in each experience again, testing against different plugins, editing the template used, and exploring different post/page states (draft, pending, private, etc). 

Mix and match typography and color palettes from all styles variations 

Style variations allow you to change the look and feel of your site, all while using the same theme. To build on the design possibilities of a block theme with style variations, 6.6 aims to add the ability to mix and match the color and typography styles of each individual style variation. 

Testing instructions

  1. Open Appearance > Editor to open the Site Editor. 
  2. Select Styles and, upon scrolling down, notice there are now Color and Typography sections split out separately from the overall style variations.
  3. Mix and match different style options. For example, pick a style variation and then below change the typography used or select your own color and typography combination.
  4. Select “Save” below to save changes.
  5. From there, click on the canvas to edit the template directly.
  6. Open the Style icon in the top right corner (if it’s not open). 
  7. Select “Blocks” and make a few changes to individual blocks globally, like Buttons or Image blocks.
  8. From there, use the chevron back arrow to return to the main styling view and select Typography. 
  9. Notice how there’s now a section called “Presets” where you can select between different typography options. Make a new selection.
  10. From there, use the chevron back arrow to return to the main styling view and select Colors. 
  11. Notice how there’s now a section called “Presets” where you can select between different color options. Make a new selection.

You can continue testing as you see fit by making additional style changes, like changing the color palette of a color preset, or trying to roll back between different revisionsRevisions The WordPress revisions system stores a record of each saved draft or published update. The revision system allows you to see what changes were made in each revision by dragging a slider (or using the Next/Previous buttons). The display indicates what has changed in each revision.

Grid layout

If you are using your own testing setup, you will need to enable the Grid Interactivity experiment by going to Gutenberg > Experiments. 

Grid is a new layout variation for the Group block that allows you to display the blocks within the group as a grid, offering new flexibility. There are two options for the Grid layout:

  • “Auto” generates the grid rows and columns automatically using a minimum width for each item. 
  • “Manual” allows specifying the exact number of columns.

This unlocks new layout possibilities that are prime for testing. 

Testing instructions

  1. Open Appearance > Editor to open the Site Editor. 
  2. Select Pages and “Add new page” to create a new page.
  3. Add a grid block. 
  4. Explore adding 3-5 blocks within the grid. For example, a set of headers or images or some combination.
  5. Use the drag handles on an individual block to change the row and column span. Try this a few times! If you are using your own test site and don’t see this option, please make sure you have enabled the Grid Interactivity experiment by going to Gutenberg > Experiments. 
  6. Select the overall grid block and open block settings.
  7. Under “Layout”, explore changing the various options between manual and auto, along with minimum column width.
  8. Return the settings to auto and change the column span of a few of the items either by using the drag handles or through the block settings under Dimensions for each individual item. 
  9. Once done, use the preview option to preview the grid layout in different screen sizes to check whether the layout remains responsive. 
  10. Continue making changes: add new blocks, change the column and row span, transform into/out of grid, etc. 

Note: The only responsive styles in place for Grid are when there are multi-column spans in auto mode which is why there are intentional steps to test this in steps 8 & 9. 

New patterns experience for Classic themes

After adding easy access to patterns with a new Patterns tab under Appearance, Classic themes are slated to have access to the pattern experience baked into the Site Editor in this release. This will provide an upgraded, modern experience of managing and creating patterns, including all of the work that’s gone into data views.

Testing instructions

Create some patterns

  1. Open Appearance > Editor to open the Site Editor. 
  2. Select Patterns and create a few patterns. As a tip to move quickly, you can always create a pattern and add in a current pattern from Inserter with a few customizations to make it your own. 
  3. Return to the admin dashboard by clicking the back chevron twice. 

Switch to a Classic theme

  1. Open Appearance > Themes.
  2. Install and activate a Classic theme. For example, Twenty Twenty-One or Twenty Twenty. 
  3. After activating, open Appearance > Patterns. You should see a more confined Patterns experience matching what you’d find in the Site Editor.
  4. Create a new pattern in this new experience and publish it. Ensure it shows up correctly. 

Access new patterns page

  1. Return to the admin dashboard by clicking the back chevron twice and create a new post under Posts > Add New. 
  2. Within this post, open the command palette with either Cmd+k on Mac or Ctrl+k on Windows and search for “Patterns”. Ensure it takes you to this new patterns experience. 
  3. Return to the post, open options and select “Manage patterns”. Ensure it takes you to this new patterns experience.
  4. Return to the post, create or insert a synced pattern and, select the three dot menu in the block toolbar and choose “Manage patterns”. Ensure it takes you to this new patterns experience.

Negative margins

A long-requested feature has finally arrived: you can now set negative margin values. As a guardrail, this option can only be added manually to prevent people from accidentally adding negative values they didn’t intend using the slider control. 

Testing instructions

Margin support is included on the following commonly used blocks: Group, Paragraph, Columns, Code, Cover, Separator, Spacer, Gallery. For a full list, please refer to this chart

  1. Open Page > Add New. 
  2. Open the Inserter > Patterns and add a few patterns. 
  3. Select or add blocks with margin support within those patterns. 
  4. Open block settings > open the styling section > head to Dimension settings.
  5. In the margin controls, manually enter a negative number and try making a few changes. 
  6. Publish and view on the front end to ensure it matches the editor. 
  7. Repeat this process with more blocks!

Rollback autoupdates

Please follow the testing instructions outlined in this merge proposal post:

There are no known issues directly related to Rollback Auto-Update that don’t currently exist in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. I (@afragen) have been testing using the test plugin. The pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is on a test site, active, and set to auto-update. I have been running like this since the beginning of the year using the PR and on other sites for several years using the feature pluginFeature Plugin A plugin that was created with the intention of eventually being proposed for inclusion in WordPress Core. See Features as Plugins..

  1. Install the PR into WP 6.5.x or trunk.
  2. Install version 0.1 of the test plugin.
  3. Activate the test plugin and enable auto-updates.

The WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ update APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. will serve the version 0.2 version of the plugin, which will cause a PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. fatal error. To confirm a rollback is successful, data is written to the error.log at every point in the auto-update process, creating an audit trail the user can use to discern the flow and results of rolling back an auto-update. This logging is only intended for testing purposes.

What to notice:

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • What would have made this experience easier for site building and for writing new content?
  • Did you find that what you created matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?
  • Did it work while using just a mobile device?

Where to report feedback

As much as possible, please report issues directly in the Gutenberg GitHub repository for every feature except the rollback autoupdates which needs issues opened in Trac. In both cases, please check first to see if an issue is already open. If you are unsure of whether to report or are blocked for any reason, just leave a comment on this post and I’ll follow up to help ensure feedback gets to the right place. 

Leave feedback by June 4th, 2024

This lines up with the launch of beta 1, when a new testing post will be available with more features to explore.

#6-6, #gutenberg

Test with Playground

Are you excited about the next big release in the WordPress world? The current target for the WordPress 6.5 release is March 26, 2024, which is less than a month away! Your help in testing 6.5 ensures everything in this release is the best it can be.

In addition to betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. and RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. testing with a handy tool like the WordPress Beta Tester pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, which requires a hosted or local development environment, did you know that you can test WordPress’s newest features using only your browser? Let’s see how WordPress Playground makes this possible.

“Instant” Test Environment

It’s true! Launching a site with WordPress Playground makes getting set up for testing much easier. Here’s a shortcut to launch Playground running the latest WordPress pre-release, with Test Reports pre-installed to help with bug reports.

  • Use the menus in the top-right corner of a Playground instance to change the PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. version, load additional PHP extensions, and more.
  • After applying changes, the Playground will reload with your new configuration.

Let’s Test!

Now open up the Help Test WordPress 6.5 post and put 6.5 through its paces! You can easily test and experiment with the latest development version of WordPress.

In addition to testing the latest pre-release build, here are the things what to Test with Playground:

  • Check Site Health to see if there are already some issues that will be unrelated to the update.
  • Check for Errors, Warnings, and Notices.
  • Open the developer console in the browser.
  • Try to create a new post, add some content, and save it, especially try to copy and paste content from another source, add comments, add media files of different types, and do other usual actions in the admin. While doing it, pay attention to the information in the console to see if there are any issues.
  • Test in different languages.
  • Use just your keyboard to navigate, or use a screen reader.
  • Test with both blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. and classic themes.
  • If you want to create your own setup in Playground and save it for later use, export your configuration with the download/export button in the top-right corner of Playground. Use the upload/import link to restore a saved configuration in the future.

If you’d like to learn more about WordPress Playground, check out the official Playground start page, and to go even further, the Playground developer portal.

Share Your Experience

Have you tried Playground for testing yourself? Were there any WordPress features that you couldn’t test? Got any tips or tricks you learned on the way? Please share your feedback in the comments below.

A big thank you to @oglekler, @ankit-k-gupta, and @ironprogrammer for contributing to this post.

#6-5#fse-outreach-program#full-site-editing

Help Test WordPress 6.5 Beta 3

This post is not covering all important features for testing in WordPress 6.5 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 3, more will come. The previous call with general instructions for testing can be found here.

If you want to help in testing but are not sure how to start, join the #core-test channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and ask for guidance. Seasoned testers will gladly point you in the right direction and share interesting stuff to play with. 


WordPress 6.5 RC1 is coming on 5 March 2024 which means String freeze – no new strings should be added or changed in the CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. to give Polyglots the ability to translate strings into different languages before the release. This is the time to pay careful attention to new strings. If you know English by heart, please test new features and check out the language.

Table of contents

Key features to test

I18n – Translations performance

WordPress Core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org. put great efforts into localization performance, and we can see significant improvement in translation loading.

TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. ticket: #59656

Detailed information about the project:

Not all the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party’s features went into the Core and the plugin is still useful with translations from PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php.-files that can benefit with OPcache.

Testing instructions

Special request to developers who maintain multilingual sites to test WordPress 6.5 with real data on staging versions of the real sites. Do it now and be confident when the time will come to update sites on production and benefit from this improvement.

General checks

  • Front end theme translations
  • Back end translations
  • Memory usage
  • Site speed
  • Compatibility with different plugins, including plugins for multilingual sites and plugins with huge amounts of strings
  • MultisiteMultisite Multisite is a WordPress feature which allows users to create a network of sites on a single WordPress installation. Available since WordPress version 3.0, Multisite is a continuation of WPMU or WordPress Multiuser project. WordPress MultiUser project was discontinued and its features were included into WordPress core.https://codex.wordpress.org/Create_A_Network. translations
  • Absence of errors with different PHP versions (more: supported versions, recommendations)

Notes:

  • WordPress 6.5 has new or changed strings that are not available for translation until RC1. WordPress, themes and plugins can also have untranslated strings in languages you choose to test with. If you want to translate WordPress, follow the guidance in the Translator Handbook.
  • If you find an issue file a new ticket on Trac under the I18N component.
  • If you find an issue with a plugin or theme, please, report it to its developer.
  • The Query Monitor plugin is an active observer and can make an impact on the result as well.
  • Some strings can lack translation, and, in this case, they will be absent in 6.4 as well as 6.5 (with some exceptions as ‘Activate’ after plugin installation that looks the same but actually is a different string).
  • At this stage, the solution is working fine at first glance, and you have to be creative, notice details and take bold actions to get into every possible corner and dig deep to be sure that there are no hidden holes.

Fresh installations

  • Install 6.4 and 6.5 latest Beta/RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. with English default language keeping everything else the same.
  • Install Query Monitor plugin on both sites to check memory usage and execution time.
  • Debug settings
  • Change the default site language to another language
    • Check that translations are working in the Admin
    • Check that translation work on the front end (you will have by default Twenty Twenty-Four theme and it has strings for the front end)
    • Check that in general each 6.5 admin page uses less memory than 6.4 pages
    • Check that JS translations work, for example by clicking on the Apply button on the plugin page without selecting any plugins, install plugin, install theme, use Quick/Bulk Edit and change post/page attributes
  • Change the user language to another one adding a third language. If you know the RTL language, please check it and mix with LTR.
  • Install a lot of languages to check that the system will still be quick with this number of languages.
  • Install plugins that have translations in chosen languages (one of the most popular will most likely be one of them) and check that translations are identical.
  • Install a classic theme and check its translations.

If we missed some aspects that should be checked, please leave a comment below this post.

Plugin dependencies

Logic of installing, activation, deactivation and removal of plugins was reworked. This is a significant enhancement in addition to already existing safeguards during plugins installation for compatibility and errors checks. 

To get detailed information and find previous test calls, please, read Merge announcement

Testing instructions

Environment

  • Install WordPress 6.5 latest Beta/RC version
  • Debug settings
    • Enable Debug and Debug log
    • Keep Console open to notice JS and ajax/REST request errors
  • Remove all plugins
  • Install Query Monitor plugin and keep it active (it will show PHP errors if they will accrue)
  • Pay attention to details during the process

General checks

Plugins without dependencies should be installed, activated, deactivated, uninstalled, enabled/disabled to auto-updates as before (single or bulk). 

  • Install several plugins
  • Activate plugin
  • Activate several plugins using Bulk action
  • Install old versions of plugins via file upload
  • Update one plugin
  • Update several plugins using Bulk action
  • Try to install plugin that will cause fatal error (invent nonexistent function, for example)
  • Deactivate one plugin
  • Deactivate several plugins using Bulk action
  • Delete a plugin
  • Delete several plugins using Bulk action
  • Did the same with Enable/Disable auto-updates

Test dependencies

  • Installation: Dependents can only be installed via Plugins > Add New if their dependencies are installed.
  • Activation: Dependents anywhere (Plugins > Installed plugins / Plugins > Add New / modals / WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ / after installing via ZIP) can only be activated if their dependencies are activated first.
  • Deactivation: Dependencies can only be deactivated on Plugins > Installed plugins (single or bulk), if their dependents are deactivated first.
  • Deletion: Dependencies can only be deleted on Plugins > Installed plugins (single or bulk), if their dependents are deleted first.

Steps to follow

Prepare several plugins and zip them into own archives to install via admin

  1. my-hello-dolly/my-hello-dolly.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: My Hello Dolly
* Requires Plugins: hello-dolly
*/
  1. my-car/my-car.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: My Car
*/
  1. my-car-trailer/my-car-trailer.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: My Car Trailer
* Requires Plugins: my-car
*/
  1. game-stone/game-stone.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: Game Stone
* Requires Plugins: game-scissors
*/
  1. game-paper/game-paper.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: Game Paper
* Requires Plugins: game-stone
*/
  1. game-scissors/game-scissors.php
<?php

/**
* Plugin Name: Game Scissors
* Requires Plugins: game-paper
*/
ActionExpected behaviour
1. Install ‘My Hello Dolly’ plugin via Plugins > Add New
– Activate plugin
Plugin is installed
Error message
Dependency is not installed automatically
2. Install ‘My Car Trailer’ plugin via Plugins > Add NewPlugin is installed
3. Activate ‘My Car Trailer’ pluginPlugin is not activated
Error message
4. Install and activate ‘My Car’ plugin
– Activate ‘My Car Trailer’ plugin
Plugins are activated
‘My Car’ plugin has no link to deactivate
5. Deactivate ‘My Car Trailer’ plugin
– Deactivate ‘My Car’ plugin
Plugins are deactivated
‘My Car’ plugin has no link to delete
6. Delete ‘My Car Trailer’ plugin
– Delete ‘My Car’ plugin
Plugins are deleted
7. Install and activate ‘My Car’ plugin
– Install and activate ‘My Car Trailer’ plugin
– Manually delete ‘My Car’ plugin in the wp-content folder
– Open Plugins page in admin
‘My Car’ plugin will be deactivated due to its absence
‘My Car Trailer’ will still be active
Notice message
8. Add plugins ‘Game Paper’, ‘Game Scissors’, ‘Game Stone’ into wp-content folderWarning on the plugin page about invalid requirements 

These are only expected behaviour.

Now it is time to be creative and think about other possible scenarios. Write them down before actually testing and check if your expectations are matching what is happening.

Remember to check the Test Dependencies section above so that your expectations meet the current status of the feature.

Other improvements

Focus styles updated for full WCAGWCAG WCAG is an acronym for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. These guidelines are helping make sure the internet is accessible to all people no matter how they would need to access the internet (screen-reader, keyboard only, etc) https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/. compliance

Trac ticket #51870

The focus style for form inputs, buttons, and links styled as buttons, which was first introduced in WordPress 5.3 (#34904), has been fully updated in WordPress 6.5. In WordPress versions prior to 6.5, the focus styles were inconsistent across different elements like inputs, buttons, and links.

This update modifies the focus styles for all interactive elements to be consistent with the styles introduced in WordPress 5.3, in order to meet WCAG accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) standards for minimum colour contrast ratios.

Please help test consistency of focus styles for form inputs, buttons and links styled as buttons with this video to guide you.

Fixing inappropriate pointer cursor on disabled form controls in WordPress

Trac ticket #59733

WordPress 6.5 introduces a fix for an issue where disabled form controls in WordPress were still showing a pointer cursor instead of the default cursor.

Previously, WordPress set all form controls and their label elements to use cursor:pointer to highlight that they are interactive. However, when a control is disabled or has `aria-disabled=”true”`, using a pointer cursor is inappropriate and doesn’t follow web standards.

The issue affected disabled checkboxes, radio buttons, and other form controls throughout WordPress, including in the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ editor. While WordPress traditionally hides disabled controls rather than disabling them, there were still instances of improper cursor styling.

To address this, the change makes sure labels and disabled form controls, including those with aria-disabled, use the default platform-dependent cursor. This follows web accessibility standards and fixes the confusing pointer cursor on disabled controls. Interactive controls will still use a pointer for consistency with WordPress’ prior styling.

Testing instructions

  • Go to Settings > Reading
  • Make sure ‘Your homepage displays’ is set to ‘Your latest posts’.
  • Hover the mouse on the ‘Homepage:’ and ‘Posts page:’ disabled select elements.
  • Observe the mouse cursor is the default one.
  • Hover the mouse on the disabled select elements labels.
  • Observe the mouse cursor is the default one.
  • Install and activate the Link Manager plugin.
  • Add a new link.
  • In the form to create a new link, check the checkbox at another web address of mine.
  • Observe all the following checkboxes and radio buttons get disabled.
  • Hover the mouse on all radio boxes, checkboxes, and their labels.
  • Observe the mouse cursor is always the default one.

Media: AVIF support enabled

Trac ticket #51228

WordPress 6.5 introduces native support for uploading, editing, and saving images in the AVIF (AV1 Image File) format, provided the server has the required AVIF libraries installed.

The AVIF image format utilises the intra-frame encoding techniques of the AV1 video codec to offer drastically improved compression ratios compared to older image formats like JPEG, PNG, and even newer ones like WebP.

By incorporating AVIF encoding and decoding into the media functions, WordPress 6.5 allows users to upload AVIF files and take advantage of the file size savings, typically around 30-50% over JPEG/PNG for equivalent visual quality. Edited AVIF images can also be resaved while preserving alpha transparency and colour profiles.

Testing instructions

  • Verify your WordPress install supports AVIF — check Tools-> Site Health -> Info tab -> (expand) Media Handling section. Either GD or Imagick must have “AVIF” listed.
  • Upload an AVIF image to a post or the media library. Some test images are available in the libavif repository.
  • Test features like cropping and rotating in the media library and the editor
  • Test viewing post in all supported browsers (Browserstack would be great for that)
  • Test using the image_editor_output_format filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to output AVIF’s for uploaded JPEGs, noting JPEG/AVIF file sizes with/without the filter.

The order of loading the import map and script modules has been changed. Now, the import map is loaded first, followed by the script modules. This fixes an issue where incremental import maps would fail if loaded after the script modules.

In classic themes, the import map and script modules are now loaded in the footer rather than the head. This is because the proper order (import map first) can’t be guaranteed when printing in the head in classic themes.

Testing instructions

Create a plugin with a dependency between two script modules and an import map. You can either follow the instructions below to create a test plugin, or simply download this test plugin.

Create a new plugin with three files:

test-plugin/test.php

<?php
/*
* Plugin Name: Test Script Modules
* Version: 1.0.0
*/

wp_register_script_module( 'bar', plugins_url( '/bar.js', __FILE__ ) );
wp_enqueue_script_module( 'foo', plugins_url( '/foo.js', __FILE__ ), array( 'bar' ) );

test-plugin/foo.js

import bar from 'bar';
bar();

test-plugin/bar.js

export default function bar() {
 console.log( 'bar' );
}
  • Upload the plugin on your test website.
  • Activate the plugin.
  • Open your site (frontend).
  • Check that “bar” was printed in the console.

To check that this fixes the positioning of the scripts/link in the classic themes:

  • Load a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. theme (Twenty Twenty-Four or another)
  • Check that the scripts with type=”importmap” and type=”module”, and the link with rel=”modulepreload” are printed in the head.
  • Load a classic theme (Twenty Fourteen)
  • Check that the scripts with type=”importmap” and type=”module”, and the link with rel=”modulepreload” are printed in the footer.

Please share feedback as soon as you can before the final release on March 26, 2024.

What else you can do

  • Share this post to advise other WordPress developers, DevOps, QA specialists, and site owners to join efforts in testing.
  • Ask your local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers to make a meetup about testing, QA, and release cycles. 
  • Subscribe to the Test Team blog to get further information and updates. You may also subscribe to the Core Team blog to stay in the loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. with Core updates, including the latest “Week in Core” posts.
  • Join our regular Test Team meetings in the #core-test Slack channel, where you can get real-time updates, get help with testing, or discuss tricky cases. Participate in team meetings and test scrubs every week to engage in the testing community.
  • Do you have suggestions for how this post can be improved? Please leave a comment below.

A big thank you to @oglekler, @lumiblog, @vipuljnext@swissspidy@costdev@ankit-k-gupta and @webtechpooja  for contributing to this post.

#6-5, #test

Help Test WordPress 6.5 Beta 1

It’s time for the next big release in the WordPress world! WordPress 6.5 is planned for March 26, 2024, and we need your help to make it the best it can be. New features and improvements make this release a game-changer as always. 

This is the second Call for Testing post for the 6.5 release after the early call that highlighted new Editor features. 

Table of Contents:

Why should you test the upcoming WordPress version

Are you a professional QA specialist, developer, business owner or blogger? You can easily test WordPress Betas, Release Candidates and the development version at any given moment to be sure that your site, theme and plugins are fully compatible with the upcoming version and there are no complications with server settings, certain data in the database or other things that can be almost unique for your site. This way you can be sure that when a new version is launched, you can easily update your site, or your theme/pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party users will be happy when they update their sites. 

Do you find something that does not match up but you are not sure? Report it in the Forums (details below).

This is also a great way for you to contribute to WordPress and become a part of the worldwide open-source community improving the CMS you are using in your day-to-day business that benefits your business as well. 

Get ready

This is quite simple. You can test the latest development version, or a specific BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. with the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin on any site you want, but please only test on a development siteDevelopment Site You can keep a copy of your live site in a separate environment. Maintaining a development site is a good practice that can let you make any changes and test them without affecting the live/production environment. and not on a production/live site. You can use any local environment and run WordPress locally or launch another site on your hosting. Some hosting companies provide a simple way to launch a staging site alongside your main site, so check what options you have. And please consider the security of your staging site by avoiding the use of simple passwords or leaving the installation process halfway through.

Test Environment installation

If you are a developer or a QA specialist and are planning to test patches, you can follow these instructions to set up a WordPress development version locally; or if you want to test just what is already in the release, use a Playground or install WordPress in your local environment and use the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin

For more detailed steps about the Beta Tester Plugin, follow this link for complete instructions.

With Playground, you can also easily test individual Core tickets.

What to test

Each release introduces a lot of new features, improvements and bug fixes. Most of them do not require any additional actions from you, but in some cases, something might need to be changed. This is why testing is a good practice as well as following along with the release to see if something can require actions from your side or provide you new opportunities.

If you missed the previous call for testing, you can start with Early Opportunities to Test WordPress 6.5.

To make your testing experience as smooth as possible and save your time, follow the instructions: 

General testing

  1. Update your theme and plugins to the latest versions.
  2. Switch to the Beta/RC/Night build you want to test.
  3. Check Site Health to see if there are already some issues that will be unrelated to the update.
  4. Check for Errors, Warnings and Notices
    • Turn on the debug log by adding settings to your wp-config.php. (Note that SCRIPT_DEBUG can change the behaviour of scripts, so it is recommended to test this constant both on and off.)
    • Run a spider against your site to process all the available pages.
    • Open the developer console in the browser.
    • Try to create a new post, add some content and save it, especially try to copy and paste content from another source, add comments, add media files of different types and do other usual actions in the admin. While doing it, pay attention to the information in the console to see if there are any issues.
      Note: Sometimes some issues are not visibly affecting any of the site functionality and sometimes it can be tricky to decipher where they are coming from. 
    • Check special functionality, go through the most important logic of your site: if you have an e-commerce store, place an order; perform a search; etc.
    • Open your site in different browsers and try the same things.
  5. Check the debug log to see if something is reported there.
    Note: Things that occur in the theme or a plugin need to be addressed to its developer. Additional information about your environment and site setting is in the Site Health information. Check information for any sensitive data before publishing it in any forum or other public space.
  6. Check Site Health to see if some issues were not present before.
    Note: depending on the message, the steps you should take can be quite different. For example, if you have a low PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. version (this issue should be present before testing the upcoming version) this can and should be changed on the hosting. So, for most of these issues, your hosting provider or a site developer will be the first person to go to.
  7. If errors appear in the log, check the paths to where these issues occurred, and contact the theme/plugin developer, or ask in the Forums (or your local native language Forum). But firstly check if this is already reported by someone else. In our case, multiple reports are not making things more important but only creating additional work for contributors who are triaging tickets. And read the sticky post first to find out how to work and communicate in the Forums.

If this looks complicated, just do what you can and take it easy. If you didn’t find anything, most likely everything is working for you just like it should.

Check the WordPress 6.5 Release Schedule to see which pre-release build can be tested now.

Advanced testing

Ready to get started to dive deeply into testing? Be creative and think out of the box. 

Tips:

  • Test across different browsers.
  • Test in different languages.
  • Compare features on different screen sizes, including tablets and mobile.
  • Use just your keyboard to navigate, or use a screen reader.
  • Test with both blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. and classic themes.
  • Try to make everything the wrong way.

Key Features to Test

There are a lot of new features mentioned in the 6.5 Beta 1 release post. Each feature needs to be properly tested in all possible ways, noticing nuances and details. Start with the Font library, it will be a lot of fun to explore and will be useful for you shortly. If you are a plugin developer or a plugin user who has issues with plugin dependencies from time to time, try Plugin dependencies to see how it is working and if this meets your expectations. And there are even more new options and enhancements in the Editor. Forget about testing and spend some time admiring the great work… Not really, test them while having fun.

New translation system

WordPress 6.5 changes how translations are being loaded, replacing the existing localization system with a more lightweight and much faster mechanism. This is mostly an invisible change which has been extensively tested before via the Performant Translations plugin. If you are using WordPress in a language other than English (US), you should verify whether translations are still loaded everywhere as expected. Especially if you are using any kind of multilingual/translation plugin. Make sure that all your translations are up-to-date on Dashboard -> Updates as well. More information about this new translation system will be published in a dedicated developer note soon.

Where to report feedback

If you find any issues but are not sure that is actually a bug or where should be reported, share them on the WordPress.org alpha/beta forums. If you are certain that you found a bug in WordPress Alpha/Beta/RC and don’t have an issue with something else, report it on Core Trac. And the Test Reports plugin will help you in creating detailed reports. Please search for an existing report first. 

For helpful reporting guidelines, refer to the Test Reports section of the Test Handbook. Also, see the CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. Team guidelines for Reporting Bugs.

Please share feedback as soon as you can before the final release on March 26, 2024.

What else you can do

  • Share this post to advise other WordPress developers, DevOps, QA specialists and site owners to join efforts in testing.
  • Ask your local meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers to make a meetup about testing, QA and release cycles. 
  • Subscribe to the Test Team blog to get further information and updates. You may also subscribe to the Core Team blog to stay in the loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. with Core updates, including the latest “Week in Core” posts.
  • Join our regular Test Team meetings in the #core-test Slack channel, where you can get real-time updates, get help with testing or discuss tricky cases. Participate in team meetings and test scrubs every week to engage in the testing community.
  • Do you have suggestions for how this post can be improved? Please leave a comment below.

A big thank you to @vipuljnext, @lumiblog, @swissspidy, @ironprogrammer, @ankit-k-gupta, @webtechpooja and @annezazu for contributing to this post.

Changelog

2024-02-15

  • Initial Post

#6-5

Early Opportunities to Test WordPress 6.5

Ahead of betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1 for WordPress 6.5 on February 13th, this is an early opportunity to provide feedback as features are rapidly underway. Of note, this is intentionally just a selection of what’s ready to test and doesn’t include everything mentioned in the roadmap. Expect a broader testing post, like this for 6.4, for the release once beta 1 is out in the world. 

Note: this post currently mentions setting up a test site with Gutenberg 17.5 RC1. This post will be updated once GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 17.5 is released on Jan 17th, 2024. 

New data views in the Site Editor

About the feature

This work kicks off aspects of the WP Admin Redesign efforts in an iterative and contained way by bringing a new experience to the template, template part, and pattern lists in the Site Editor. Right now, the following features are slated for inclusion:

  • Ability to display a table with specific fields, pagination and quick actions.
  • UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. for toggling fields and for sorting and filtering data by field.
  • UI for selecting entries and performing bulk actions.
  • Support for different layouts, like classic table, grid view (including gallery), with the option to display a side-by-side preview.
  • Support for saving and toggling between “views”, which are specific configurations of layouts, field visibility, etc.

For this early testing opportunity, not everything is yet in place. 

Prerequisites

There are a few different environments that can be used for testing. Pick one to use:

The experiment for ‘new admin views’ will also need to be switched on from the Gutenberg pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party experiments page (wp-admin/admin.php?page=gutenberg-experiments).

Testing instructions

Here are some suggestions for functionality to test, but you are encouraged to experiment beyond these. 

Templates

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select Templates.
  2. From the list, select “Manage all templates”.
  3. In this view, you’ll see the new experience. 
  4. In the upper right corner under “Add New Template” select the View Options icon.
  5. Change the layout of the view by selecting “Layout” and try selecting different items.
  6. Change the “Sort By” option. 
  7. Change what fields are shown by selecting different options under “Fields”.
  8. Change how many items are displayed with the “Rows per page” option to 10 and try using the pagination.
  9. Add a filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. and reset it. Here’s a screenshot for guidance.
  10. Use the search box to search for “full width” (this is only available if you use InstaWP, otherwise create your own custom template), use the three dot menu to rename it before deleting it outright. 

Patterns

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select Patterns.
  2. In this view, you’ll see the new experience. 
  3. In the upper right corner select the View Options icon.
  4. Change the “Sort By” option. 
  5. Change what fields are shown by selecting different options under “Fields” and enabling sync status. 
  6. Change how many items are displayed with the “Rows per page” option to 10 and try using the pagination.
  7. Add a filter to sort by synced or not synced and reset it. Here’s a screenshot for guidance.
  8. Use the search box to search for a pattern and use the three dot menu to duplicate it. 

Pages

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select Pages.
  2. In this view, you’ll see the new experience. 
  3. Underneath “Add New Page” select the View Options icon. 
  4. Change the layout of the view by selecting “Layout”.
  5. Change the “Sort By” option. Note that there are pages in different stages of publication (draft, private, published) and two users on the site if you are using the InstaWP instance.
  6. Change what fields are shown by selecting different options under “Fields”.
  7. Change how many items are displayed with the “Rows per page” option to 10 and try using the pagination.
  8. Add a filter to sort by author and status. Here’s a screenshot for guidance. Note that there are pages in different stages of publication (draft, private, published) and two users on the site if you are using the InstaWP instance.
  9. Use the search box to search for the “About Me” page and use the three dot menu to view it. 
  10. On the left hand side under “Custom Views”, select the “+ New view” option to add a custom view.
  11. Name the view and select “Create”. From there, customize it to your liking.
  12. Select “Review 1 change” and save to ensure this view saves.
  13. Leave the Site Editor and return to ensure the view remains.

Pattern Overrides

About the feature

Building upon the power of synced patterns, pattern overrides allows you to ensure a synced layout and style across patterns while enabling each instance of the pattern to have customized content. This provides consistency in design across different pieces of content. For instance, consider a user creating a ‘Recipe’ pattern. With the enhanced feature, the user can insert this pattern into multiple posts, ensuring that the layout and styling components, such as the overall design of the recipe card, remain consistent across instances. Meanwhile, the content, such as Ingredients and Steps, would be local to each post, allowing for individual customization. Additionally, folks would then be able to revisit and modify the design of the recipe pattern without affecting the content in existing instances.

Prerequisites

There are a few different environments that can be used for testing. Pick one to use:

The experiment for ‘pattern overrides’ will also need to be switched on from the Gutenberg plugin experiments page (wp-admin/admin.php?page=gutenberg-experiments).

Testing instructions

Create a synced pattern with overrides

  1. Create a new post
  2. Insert a mixture of blocks that include paragraphs and optionally other blocks too
  3. Select the blocks, and ‘Create a pattern’ from the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. options menu
  4. Give the pattern a name and make it ‘synced’
  5. Once the pattern has been created, note that the content is locked and uneditable
  6. Click the ‘Edit original’ button on the toolbar, this will take you into an isolated view for editing the pattern
  7. Select a paragraph block in the pattern, and in the block settings sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. expand the advanced section. Check the ‘Allow instance overrides’ option
  8. Use the ‘Back’ button in the headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. area of the editor to go back to the post

Editing the instances

  1. Select the pattern and duplicate it
  2. Now click the paragraphs that you checked ‘Allow instance overrides’ for and notice you can edit them, and the updates don’t sync across instances of the pattern, the changes are local to the pattern
  3. View the post, the frontend should match the editor

Robust RevisionsRevisions The WordPress revisions system stores a record of each saved draft or published update. The revision system allows you to see what changes were made in each revision by dragging a slider (or using the Next/Previous buttons). The display indicates what has changed in each revision. 

About the feature

Templates and template parts will now show revisions, alongside broader upgrades to style revisions with more detailed descriptions, pagination, and the ability to view revisions with the Style Book enabled. 

Prerequisites

There are a few different environments that can be used for testing. Pick one to use:

Testing instructions

To better test this feature, two different prebuilt options are offered, with one containing a large number of revisions already and one completely fresh. See Prerequisites above for more information and please consider testing both scenarios!

For styles:

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select Styles.
  2. Make a few changes to Styles and save your changes in between each change. For example, add some custom colors, change block specific styling, and switch to a new style variation. 
  3. After a few changes have been saved, open up the Styles panel and select the revisions icon. 
  4. Select a prior version and notice the description of the revision. 
  5. While selecting the prior version, toggle on the Style Book and explore that view. 
  6. Roll back to a prior version. 
  7. Make more changes to Styles, saving each time, and repeat the process until you see pagination in the style revisions if you’re using the fresh install.
  8. Try going to different pages of revisions and ensure you can roll back. 

For templates and template parts:

  1. Open Appearance > Editor and select a template. 
  2. Make a few changes to the template and save changes in between each change. For example, remove blocks, change block alignments, add blocks, change the order, etc. 
  3. Open block settings and 

Font Library

About the feature

The Font Library makes it easy for anyone to install, remove, and activate fonts across your site. It’s available globally, independent of the theme activated, similar to the Media Library. Any installed font, whether installed by a user or a theme, can then be selected across the editing experience.

Prerequisites

There are a few different environments that can be used for testing. Pick one to use:

Testing actions

Pulling from this prior dedicated post on this same feature, here are some suggestions for functionality to test, but you are encouraged to experiment beyond these:

  • Upload fonts using the upload dialog and drag-and-drop.
  • Install fonts from Google Fonts using the Install Fonts tab.
  • Verify that uploaded/installed font assets are stored in your site’s /wp-content/fonts/ directory.
  • Activate/deactivate individual font variants.
  • Compare active fonts with the list on the Styles > Typography sidebar.
  • Assign custom fonts to elements (like text or headings) on the Styles > Typography sidebar.
  • Assign custom fonts to specific block types (like buttons) in Styles > Blocks.
  • Check how the fonts appear on your site’s frontend.
  • Delete an uploaded font family, and verify that the font assets are removed from /wp-content/fonts/.

Additional technical feedback opportunities

Reporting bugs and enhancements 

Please report all bugs and enhancements in the Gutenberg GitHub repository. Thanks so much for helping test what’s to come in 6.5 early and often. Please note that both bugs and enhancements to improve current functionality are greatly appreciated and welcomed. 

If anything is amiss with this post or you’re having trouble contributing, please comment below or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” me, @annezazu, in WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

#6-5, #gutenberg, #site-editor

Help Test WordPress 6.4

Get ready for the next big release in the WordPress world! WordPress 6.4 is set to launch on November 7, 2023, and we need your help to make sure it’s the best it can be. With exciting new features and improvements, this release promises to be a game-changer for WordPress users everywhere.

Stay up to date with the latest pre-release builds by checking the WordPress 6.4 Release Schedule for availability. For real-time updates and discussions, join the #core-test Slack channel. Engage in the testing community by participating in weekly scheduled team meetings and test scrubs.

Table of Contents:

Testing Environment 💻

Please only test on a development siteDevelopment Site You can keep a copy of your live site in a separate environment. Maintaining a development site is a good practice that can let you make any changes and test them without affecting the live/production environment. and not on a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site.

Once your development site is set up, please install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin. After activation:

  • Navigate to Tools > BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. Testing.
  • Set the update channel to “Bleeding Edge” and click Save Changes.
  • Set the stream option to “Beta/RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. only” and click Save Changes again.
  • Navigate to Dashboard > Updates and click the Update to latest… button.

For more detailed steps, click this link for complete instructions.

Testing Tips 💡

At a high level, here are a few tips to keep in mind to get the most out of helping to test:

  • Test across different browsers.
  • Test in different languages.
  • Compare features on different screen sizes, including tablets and mobile.
  • Use just your keyboard to navigate, or use a screen reader.
  • Test with both blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. and classic themes.

Key Features to Test 🔑

Style

Global Styles RevisionsRevisions The WordPress revisions system stores a record of each saved draft or published update. The revision system allows you to see what changes were made in each revision by dragging a slider (or using the Next/Previous buttons). The display indicates what has changed in each revision.

This release introduced a handy feature that allows you to reset global styles back to their default settings with ease (52965). With this enhancement, you can effortlessly reset any changes made to global styles back to their original state. To try out this feature, simply make a few revisions to the global style and then open the revision panel. You’ll see a list of all the revisions, and at the bottom, there’s an option called “Reset to Default.” Click on it to return to the original settings.  Now, you only need to go through one revision check instead of two (53281). Previously, the revision panel was only available after two styles of revisions were saved in the database.

Please help test global style revisions with this video to guide you:

Twenty Twenty-Four Default Block Theme

Twenty Twenty-Four default theme is set to launch in 6.4. The theme for the year 2024 will use new design tools to make websites look better and be easier to edit. It will have special designs for three groups of people: entrepreneurs and small businesses, photographers and artists, and writers and bloggers. Here, you can find Related Gutenberg Issues and PRs.

Please help test the default Twenty Twenty-Four theme, this is the demo video:

Interface

Write with Ease

In this release, ongoing efforts are being made to ensure a smooth and enjoyable writing experience in WordPress(#53305). These enhancements include the addition of new keyboard shortcuts and improvements in copying and pasting text from other sources. The Link preview feature (53566) now includes a convenient “Open in new tab” control, making it simpler to enable or disable this option. Additionally, toolbars for List, Quote, and Navigation blocks have been enhanced to make your writing and editing process more efficient.(#53699, #53697). Please help test using keyboard shortcuts and copying and testing text from other sources.

Please help test the improved writing experience for list items with this video to guide you:

Please help test the capture toolbar in the quote block with this video to guide you:

Please help test the ‘Open in New Tab’ feature with this video to guide you:

Improvements to List View

The List View in WordPress has undergone some great enhancements. Now, managing your content is even more straightforward and user-friendly. You can easily rename Group blocks using a handy options menu that pops up. When dealing with gallery and image blocks, you can now see previews of your media to make sure everything looks just right. Additionally, resizing and duplicating blocks have become much more efficient, with keyboard shortcuts available for quick actions. The List View now allows the escape key to deselect blocks if blocks are selected(48708). These improvements in the List View make organizing and editing your content in WordPress a breeze.

This video is showcasing the use Escape to deselect blocks feature:

Please help test by renaming group blocks in the list view with this video guide:

This image showcases a media preview for the gallery and image blocks:

An image showcasing media preview for gallery and image blocks


Please help test by using keyboard shortcuts for duplicating blocks with this video to guide you:

 Improvements to the Command Palette 

The Command Palette has undergone several changes and improvements since its first introduction in WordPress 6.3. For example, you can now do more with blocks using new commands, including block transforms and the options to duplicate, copy, remove, and insert after/before. The Command Palette also looks different with a fresh design. Plus, it now supports adding commands without icons. If you’re using WordPress on a small screen, like a mobile phone, the Command Palette will work better for you. It also uses more consistent language and actions, making it easier to use. Lastly, there are improvements in snackbar motion, making your experience smoother. These changes make managing your WordPress site even easier and more user-friendly.

Please help test adding blocks by commands and registering commands without icons with this video to guide you:

This image shows you registering commands without icons.

This video is showing some improvement for the command palette on smaller screens:

Test with tweak and add more consistent commands:

This video displays snackbar motion, and you can test this feature by similarly giving commands.

Please check out more improvements to the recent updates made to the Command Palette.

Blocks

Block HooksHooks In WordPress theme and development, hooks are functions that can be applied to an action or a Filter in WordPress. Actions are functions performed when a certain event occurs in WordPress. Filters allow you to modify certain functions. Arguments used to hook both filters and actions look the same. (Previously Auto-inserting Blocks)

Introducing the Block Hooks feature, a reimagined approach to the earlier concept of Auto-inserting Blocks. Basically, Block Hooks is an APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. that developers can use to make websites more flexible. It allows one block to attach itself to another block and show its content before or after that block. You can also attach a block to a parent block and make it appear at the beginning or end of the list of child blocks inside it. (53987

Even though Block Hooks is mainly for developers, it also gives a nice experience to the end users by automatically inserting a block into a specific location. It lets developers place blocks where they want them to be and gives room for customization. The goal is to make block themes more adaptable with the help of plugins.

One thing to keep in mind is that the block using this API will only be auto-inserted if the original template or part hasn’t been changed by the user. This is done to respect the user’s choice. This API can only be applied with block patterns, template parts, and templates that come from the block theme files. It doesn’t alter anything the user has already created or changed on a website. 

Note: This feature is a more technical item to test. Check out this for a more detailed guide.

Query LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. Block Pagination Enhancements 

Now, you no longer need a full page reload when you navigate between pages in a Query Loop block. There’s a new setting that prevents full page reloads. This improved way of moving between pages is made possible by a special version of the Interactivity API, and it makes browsing smoother. Plus, you can also decide how many pages you want to show using the Query Page Numbers block for even more control. Query block: Client-side pagination (53812), make mid-size parameter settable for Query Pagination block. (#51216).

Please help test adding pagination in your query block. This video guides you through the pagination in the query block.

Client Side Pagination

List Block Enhancement 

In the List Block, a new feature has been introduced that allows you to merge consecutive lists instead of keeping them as individual blocks. This enhancement streamlines your editing experience by combining lists that appear one after another, making it easier to manage and format your content seamlessly. (52995)

Group Block Enhancements

Now, you can easily rename Group blocks to organize your content better (53735). This feature makes it simpler to identify and manage different sections of your page, streamlining your editing experience. Additionally, the introduction of background images for Group blocks brings more creativity and customization to your layouts. These enhancements empower you to create more organized and visually appealing content in WordPress. (53934)

Background image support to the Group block

Please help test by renaming the group blocks using this video guide.

Add Aspect Ratio to the Image Block’s placeholder

Aspect ratio controls to the Featured ImageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. block were introduced in the 6.3 version, and now, these helpful controls have been extended to the placeholder of the Image block. This enhancement offers greater flexibility, particularly when designing wireframe-style patterns that establish a layout for users to fill in with their content.

You can select the default coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress./navigation-link variant within the core/navigation block, offering more flexibility and customization options for your navigation menus (50982)

Please test by adding navigation block and start customizing it with this video to guide you.

Add Lightbox Functionality for your Images

WordPress 6.4 introduces an improvement to the image experience with the new Image Lightbox feature. Recognizing the need for clarity in the user interface (UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing.), a dedicated Settings panel has been instituted for the image block. Within this panel, users can easily locate the Lightbox toggle, available both in Global Styles and Block settings.Display your pictures in an engaging way using the brand-new lightbox functionality. This cool feature will work with image blocks, so you can click on an image and see it in a bigger size right on top of your existing content. (51132)

General Block Improvements

  • Preformatted: Add margin and padding support. (45196)
  • Social Links: Add Threads Icon. (52685)
  • Verse: Enable line breaks. (52928)
  • Details: Add block gap support. (53282)
  • File: Add margin and padding support. (45107)
  • Column: Add stretch alignment (53325).
  • Image: Keep image size upon replacing an image (49982).
  • Buttons: Allow using a button element for button blocks (54206).
  • Post Content: Add block gap support (54282).
  • Post Content: Add color control support (51326).
  • Footnotes: Add link, background, and text color support (52897).
  • Footnotes: Add typography, dimensions, and border block supports (53044).

Patterns

Create your own Pattern Categories

Now, you can neatly group your patterns by categories when you create them. These categories are handy because you can use them to organize and find your patterns easily. You can also edit these categories in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. when you’re editing a pattern.

To ensure this feature functions smoothly, here are the steps to follow: Begin by adding various user patterns, both synced and unsynced, assigning categories to each (remember to hit ‘enter’ or add a ‘,’ after each categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging.). Then, navigate to the site editor patterns page and verify that the categories appear in the left navigation panel. Confirm that selecting a category displays the corresponding patterns accurately and that theme patterns continue to appear as expected. Check that all patterns are accessible under ‘All Patterns’ and that the search function operates seamlessly. Lastly, duplicate a theme pattern and ensure that the new pattern inherits the same category. Additionally, when adding a user pattern with the ‘Footer’ category, make sure it displays alongside the theme Footer patterns, taking into account the category slug distinction (theme patterns use ‘footer’ while the user category name should match this).
To make things even simpler, all patterns, whether they’re synced or not, are listed together in one place. There’s no need to look in different tabs for synced patterns; they’re all in the same section. (53837)

Please help test creating categories, adding synced and unsynced patterns, and assign them categories with this video to guide you:

Import/Export Patterns as JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. files.

To maintain compatibility with Reusable blocks, you can now import and export patterns as JSON files, providing a straightforward way to transfer custom patterns between websites. (54337

Please help test import and export patterns with this video to guide you:

Where to Report Feedback 🗣

If you find any issues, it’s best to share them on the WordPress.org alpha/beta forums, or, if you are more technically savvy and comfortable, on Core Trac. For helpful reporting guidelines, refer to the Test Reports section of the Test Handbook.

Please share feedback as soon as you can before the release on November 7, 2023.

A big thank you to @annezazu,@annebovelett @coachbirgit, @ironprogrammer, and @rashiguptaa for reviewing and contributing to this post.

Changelog 🪵

2023-11-01

  • Changed Query loop enhanced pagination name to Force Page Load.

2023-10-06

  • Removed Font Library feature as it is punted(moved) to the WP 6.5 release.

2023-10-03

  • Update on Font library and link added to individual Help Test font library post.

2023-09-26

  • Initial post.

#6-4, #call-for-testing, #fse-outreach-program, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing Call #26: Final touches

This post is the twenty-sixth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program and likely the final one with a title to match. For more information about this experimental program, please review this FAQ for helpful details and check out how it’s going to evolve. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Overview

With WordPress 6.4 on the horizon, this call for testing takes you through many of the major pieces set to land with this release:

Framing

You’re set to launch your new photography portfolio. You plan to add more content in the coming months so you want to ensure it’s well organized and well equipped for future tweaks/additions with new fonts and new patterns. When you originally started the site, you didn’t yet had a vision for how to finish it until now!

Testing Instructions 

For this test, please use the following pre-built site as we’ll be rapidly switching between GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ versions:

  1. Open this link only once: https://app.instawp.io/launch?t=fse-testing-call-26&d=v2 
  2. Please do not repeatedly open this link as it creates a new site each time and there’s a limit of 50 sites that can be created. 
  3. This will launch a site for you to use for up to 24 hours. Select “Magic Login” to log in to the wp-admin dashboard. 
  4. Save the link to your site so you can access it again during the test. 

Manage fonts

  1. Head to Appearance > Editor > Styles > and select the pencil icon to open up the Styles panel.
  2. Select Typography to view a list of active fonts and click the “Aa” icon to open up font management.
  3. Upload a new font file using the drag and drop option. You can download a font from https://fonts.google.com/
  4. From the font manager, select “Inclusive Sans”, a previously uploaded font, and choose “Delete” to uninstall this option. 
  5. From there, close out of the font manager, and change the Headings and Text font option to the new font you uploaded.
  6. Save changes.

Get your site organized 

  1. Use Command + K or evoke the Command Palette by clicking on the Top Toolbar field and use it to open the List View (purposefully leaving out the exact command).
  2. Select the Columns block containing the “Want to work with me?” text and, again using the Command Palette, group this block.
  3. From there, you’ll see two different Group blocks on the page. Select each and, using the three dot menu in List View, find the “rename” option and give each a different name.

Create a pattern 

  1. Select the “Want to work with me?” Group block with its new name and open the block settings.
  2. Under the Styles tab, add a black and white background image from the Media Library. Adjust the colors of the text as needed afterwards. 
  3. Using the three dot menu, create a new synced pattern for “Want to work with me?” content and add a categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging. of your choosing.

Finish your Portfolio page

  1. Using the Command Palette, open the draft page titled “Portfolio”. On this page, you’re going to create three sections of photos “With People”, “Without people”, and “Black and White” to show off your work alongside a section of all of your photos already listed. 
  2. Add the unsynced pattern titled “Portfolio section” using whatever method of your choosing (Inserter with the + button in the top left or the Quick Inserter with the / option). 
  3. Using this pattern and the default content it provides, fill out the respective details including a proper heading, description, image with a set aspect ratio that epitomizes the rest of the images, and remaining gallery items. Here’s an example of what this should look like.
  4. Create all three sections following these steps: “With People”, “Without people”, and “Black and White”.
  5. Change the font for each of these headings to be different than the global option set originally in Styles (and ensure all options appear).
  6. Open List View and rearrange each section in a different order by dragging and dropping with help from the image and gallery previews. 
  7. As a finishing touch, select the first standalone image in each section, open the Block Settings sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme., and toggle on the option to “Expand on click”. 

Swap templates

  1. Once done, open Block Settings and, under the Page tab, select “Pages” next to Template. 
  2. From there, you’ll see options “Edit Template” or “Swap Template”. Select “Swap Template” and choose the “Portfolio” option. 
  3. Before saving, change the Page status to “Published”.
  4. Save changes.
  5. Use the Command Palette to view your site. Notice this new Portfolio page is automatically included in your menu and that when you hover over the first standalone image in each section there’s an option to expand it and view in isolation. 

Announce your new portfolio and remove the Like button

  1. Return to the Site Editor and, using the Command Palette, start the process to add a new post. 
  2. Title the post “Announcing my portfolio” and write a brief paragraph, including a List block that mentions each portfolio section (“With People”, “Without people”, and “Black and White”). Notice that the block toolbar always stays with the overall list rather than each individual item. 
  3. Publish the post and view it. Leave a comment on your own post and notice that there’s a Like button available. 
  4. Go back into the Post Editor and, using the Command Palette, open the Single Post template. 
  5. Using List View, select the Comment Template and open Block Settings. Notice there’s a Plugin section with a Like Button option turned on. Turn this option off and save changes. 

Go further

From there, view your site, click around, and make any additional changes you’d like! Create new posts, create new patterns, or adjust your site’s styles. While this walks through an initial set of items, feel free to explore further based around the new features coming in 6.4.

What to notice:

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • What would have made this experience easier for site building and for writing new content?
  • Did you find that what you created matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?
  • Did it work while using just a mobile device? Shout out to @nomadskateboarding for this addition!

Leave Feedback by October 9th, 2023

#fse-testing-call

FSE Program Testing Call #25: Let’s start from the beginning

This post is the twenty-fifth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program. For more information about this experimental program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Overview

WordPress 6.3 just launched this week, bringing with it the ability to build out all parts of your site without leaving the Site Editor. While we’ve tested everything leading up to the release, it’s time now to see how all of the pieces are landing with a fresh take, especially with all of the fixes found during the betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. and RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. periods, and to look ahead to where 6.4 aims to iterate

To do this, this call for testing will go through a “starting from scratch” experience, from changing styles, using and creating patterns, creating a few pages, and setting up a menu. As part of this, you’ll explore new tools, like the Command Palette, and well loved tools, like List View. This test is intentionally more open ended to encourage exploration and to gather user experience feedback. It’s ultimately not about testing individual, new features and is more centered on testing how the features continue to come together. 

Since the 6.4 cycle is a bit shorter than others, this call for testing will only be open for two weeks rather than three so additional testing can occur as more features and refinements are released. 

Testing Instructions 

To use a prebuilt test site: 

  1. Open this link only once: https://app.instawp.io/launch?t=fse-testing-call-25&d=v2 
  2. Please do not repeatedly open this link as it creates a new site each time and there’s a limit of 50 sites that can be created. 
  3. This will launch a site for you to use for up to 24 hours. Select “Magic Login” to log in to the wp-admin dashboard. 
  4. Save the link to your site so you can access it again during the test. 

To set up your own test site: 

  1. Have a test site using the latest version of WordPress. It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install and activate the Twenty Twenty Three by going to Appearances > Themes.
  3. Install and activate Gutenberg 16.4 or the latest version of GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ after 16.4.

If you have any issues with manual setup, just comment on the post or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” me (@annezazu) in WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

What follows are open ended tasks to complete, intentionally listed without detailed instructions in order to better stress test what’s been shipped in 6.3 and discover where the experience can be clarified:

  • Pick and save a new style variation. 
  • Add a border to all Image blocks on your site and change the size of all H2 headings using Styles. 
  • Create an “About” page and turn on the Top Toolbar setting. Copy and paste content from this Google Doc, noting any issues in pasting with the format or content. 
  • Create a “Resume” page with a few different headings and use the Table of Contents blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. to better organize the page. 
  • Change the size and alignment of the Page title in your Pages template. 
  • At various points, use the Command Palette to either navigate between parts of your site or open various tools, like List View, or settings, like Top Toolbar. 
  • Create a menu that just lists your About page, a link to your WordPress.org profile with the Social Icons block, and a Search block. 
  • Create a synced pattern that details how to get in touch with you and add it to your “About” and “Resume” pages where you see fit. 
  • Duplicate the synced pattern from the Patterns section and make an unsynced version.

If you’d like to go further and have time to do so, please explore the following: creating pages and editing the template surrounding the page & building and inserting more patterns, synced and unsynced. 

If you get stuck at any point, please note it in the comments with details around where you tried to attempt to complete the task. 

What to notice:

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • What would have made this experience easier for site building and for writing new content?
  • Did you find that what you created matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?
  • Did it work while using just a mobile device? Shout out to @nomadskateboarding for this addition!

Leave Feedback by August 23, 2023

#fse-testing-call