Help Test WordPress 5.8’s FSE Features

With WordPress 5.8 slated to ship on July 20th, this post seeks to consolidate ways for those in the FSE Outreach Program (anyone can join!) to help test specific features related to the overall full site editing project that will be included in this release. This is meant to bolster, not replace, overall 5.8 testing efforts. Theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. is explicitly not mentioned here as there’s currently a dedicated testing post for that feature with feedback open until July 14th. 

For more information about the outreach program, please review this FAQ for helpful details and check out the latest schedule. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more. 

Important note: Anything marked as [Technical] is best for those comfortable with more advanced testing steps. 

Testing environment

Please only test on a development siteDevelopment Site You can keep a copy of your live site in a separate environment. Maintaining a development site is a good practice that can let you make any changes and test them without affecting the live/production environment. and not on a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site

Once a development site is set up, please install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin before setting it to: 

  • Update channel to “Bleeding edge”
  • Stream options to “BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. only”

If you need more specific steps, here are more detailed instructions you can follow

BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Widgets Editor

The block widgets editor allows you to use blocks in widgets areas and control them further in the CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings. with live preview, scheduling, etc. The following items are considered a high priority to test:

  • Migrating classic widgets to this new screen. 
  • Switching between themes.
  • Editing blocks in widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. areas in the Customizer. 
  • Confirming opting in and out works properly. You can review each mechanism under “Opting out of the block-based widgets editor” in this post

For robust testing steps for each of these items, please review this specific call for testing from earlier in the release process. For more information about this new feature, check out this Dev note covering all of the details

Template Editing Mode & Theme Blocks

Template editing mode allows you to edit your content’s template with blocks, including some new theme blocks like the Site Title block or Page List block. As a reminder, template editing mode is opt in for Classic Themes and opt out for Block Themes. This means that if you want to test this, you’ll need to use a block theme along with both the Gutenberg plugin and the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin

The following items are a high priority to test:

  • [Technical] Opting into and out of template editing mode. More information about how to do this can be found under “Theme Support” in this post. Bonus if you test with different themes. 
  • Customizing templates, including creating new ones, after either using a theme that has opted in or using a block theme with GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/
  • Exploring each new Theme Block listed in this post to build out a more robust template. 

For robust testing steps around using and creating templates, please follow these previous calls for testing: create a custom portfolio page and create custom landing pages

Note: If you use a block theme to test this, you will need to install the Gutenberg plugin alongside it in order for everything to work with WordPress 5.8. 

Duotone

Duotone is a feature that allows you to add colors to your images and enhance your content. It works best with high contrast images, so keep that in mind as you test the following priority items: 

  • [Technical] Adding duotone support to a registered block using the still experimental block supports described here
  • Using the feature in the Image and Cover Block. Remember that you can use this with videos in the cover block too and that you can set your own custom colors!

For more information about this feature, check out the WordPress news post that covers it in depth

Query LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. Block

The Query Loop Block (previously called the Query Block) is a powerful new block that unlocks the ability to easily show off posts from a specific categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging., allowing you to do things like quickly creating a portfolio or a favorite recipe page. Think of it as a more complex and powerful Latest Posts Block! Currently, this new block offers multiple ways for displaying lists of posts and comes with new block patterns that take advantage of its flexibility and creative possibilities. 

To help test this, explore the patterns built into the block, try changing the default query in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. settings, placing it inside a columns block, and more. Keep in mind that to create a better user experience, the content within the Query Loop isn’t able to be edited but can be customized (i.e., Post Title text can’t be changed but you can change the color of the Post Title Block). 

For robust testing steps around using the query block, please follow this previous call for testing that was focused on the Query Loop block.

Where to report feedback

If you find any issues, it’s best to share them on the alpha/beta forums, or Trac if you are more technically savvy and comfortable. Please share feedback before the release on July 20, 2021.

#fse-outreach-program

FSE Program Testing Call #8: Thrive with Theme.json

Props to @daisyo and @jffng for the massive amount of help in writing and perfecting this call for testing. 

Important note: Compared to previous calls for testing for the FSE Outreach program, this is intentionally targeting a more developer-centric audience compared to site builders or end users in order to bring high impact feedback for theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML., a new tool for extenders. You can read more about what to expect with upcoming efforts here

Feature Overview

At the highest level, theme.json is a configuration file used to enable or disable features and set default styles for both a website and blocks. Rather than dealing with a ton of theme support flags or alternative methods, theme.json provides a consolidated and canonical way to manage it all. These settings include options like:

  • What customization options should be made available or hidden from the user.
  • What are the default colors, font sizes, etc available to the user.
  • Defines the default layout of the editor (widths and available alignments).

This configuration file is a big part of what makes blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. themes so powerful as it allows for finer-grained control, and introduces the first step in “managing styles” for future WordPress releases. Here are a few of the top benefits of using this new mechanism: 

  • It allows themes to provide settings per block which wasn’t possible before since add_theme_support targets settings for the entire editor. 
  • Themes using theme.json will automatically get classes and CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. Custom Properties enqueued for the presets they declare instead of needing to handle this themselves. Plus, this means translations of preset names are also managed for them!
  • Theme.json will coordinate coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., theme, and user styles in a way that reduces the amount of CSS that needs to ship as well as help resolve specificity problems. 

While block themes won’t work with WordPress 5.8 without the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party due to some theme blocks being left out of the release that weren’t quite ready to ship, it’s still an important feature coming to 5.8 that needs testing and exploration. If you’ve been curious about the world of block themes or have started building your own, this call for testing is for you and should help you to continue to explore what’s possible with theme.json while giving you a chance to share what else you’d like to see.

You can read more about this feature in the documentation here

Beginner Testing Steps

This section is for those wanting to get a sense of what theme.json can control and what the output will look like. 

  1. Head to https://gutenberg-theme.xyz/. This is a tool that can help generate the settings section of the theme.json file. 
  2. From there, try toggling on and off various theme supports. This will help you explore just a few settings that are possible to control with theme.json. For example, you can toggle on and off Custom Colors or Custom Link controls. Notice that the output in the browser changes based on your selection.
  3. Use the + button next to Palette, Gradients, or Font Sizes to explore adding customizations. Keep in mind that you can edit both the slug and specific variables, like color name or font size. 
  4. Add a few customizations and review the output! If you want to go a step further and use what you’ve created, check out the intermediate steps. 

Intermediate Testing Steps

This section is for those wanting to dig deeper into theme.json by writing their own file and exploring the various settings it can control. 

Note: this mainly focuses on just theme supports and presets for blocks in the settings section of theme.json rather than Global Styles. 

Set up your testing environment

  1. Create a Fresh WordPress Install.
  2. Install and Activate Gutenberg Plugin while using the latest version (10.9.0 as of writing this).
  3. Download and Install TT1 Blocks from the Theme Directory
  4. Navigate to the TT1 Blocks Theme directory and open the theme.json file in a text editor or IDE.
  5. Replace the theme.json file with this gist before starting the next steps. It’s expected that this will really simplify what the theme looks like so don’t panic if you see a lot of options removed. This is intentional to simplify the settings you’re changing.

Generally speaking, please use the latest versions of each part of the setup and keep in mind that versions might have changed since this post was shared.

Layout

  1. Create a new post.
  2. Add a cover block with a solid colored background and several lines of content in an inner paragraph block to the post.
  3. Add another cover block with a solid colored background and several lines of content in an inner paragraph block. Set this block to “Wide Width”.
  4. Add a third cover block with a solid colored background and several lines of content to the post and set the block to “Full Width”.
  5. Publish Post.
  6. Load the post on the front end and note the width of the cover blocks.
  7. Change the contentSize value to a different pixel value in the layout section of theme.json.
  8. Change wideSize value to a different pixel value in the Layout section of theme.json.
  9. Load the edit view of the previously created post and confirm that new widths are reflected in the editor
  10. Load the post on the front end and confirm that the new widths are reflected on the front end of the site
  11. Extra Credit: Try setting the width values to something other than “px” such as “em”, “rem”, “vh”, “vw”, or “%”.

Typography

  1. Set the following typography settings to true in theme.json
    • customFontWeight (Heading Block)
    • customFontSize (Paragraph Block)
    • customLineHeight (Paragraph Block)
    • dropCap (Paragraph Block)
  2. Test the visibility of typography settings in a paragraph block (font size, line height and drop cap).
  3. Test the visibility of typography settings in a Heading block (font size, font weight, line height).
  4. Test that each of settings apply to the block on the front end.
  5. Change the typography settings to false in theme.json.
  6. Confirm that each of the custom typography settings in the paragraph block are no longer present in the block editor (Note the typography settings applied previously may still apply to existing blocks).
  7. Extra credit: Add one or more font families and font sizes to the typography section of the theme.json file. Test your custom font families and sizes using a Button block.

Border

  1. Set the following border settings to true in theme.json:
    • "customColor": true
    • "customRadius": true
    • "customStyle": true
    • "customWidth": true
  2. Create a group block with an inner paragraph block with several lines of text.
  3. Test visibility of border settings in a group block (Style, Width, Radius, Custom Color).
  4. Test that settings apply to the block on the front end.
  5. Change the above border settings to false in theme.json.
  6. Confirm that border settings in group block are no longer present in the block editor.

Color

  1. Set the following color settings for custom and customGradient to true in theme.json:
    • "custom": true
    • "customGradient": true
    • "link": true
  2. Add a cover block with a custom gradient background and several lines of content in an inner paragraph block to the post.
  3. Add a link to the paragraph block and set the link color to a custom color.
  4. Add another cover block with an image background and several lines of content in an inner paragraph block to the post. Set the cover background to use a duotone preset.
  5. Change the duotone colors for the background image to use custom colors for the duotone shadows and highlights settings.
  6. Extra Credit: Add one or more additional colors to the palette and duotone or gradient presets. For more information about CSS gradients check these resources from CSS Tricks and CSS Gradient. Keep in mind that for duotone presets, you’ll need to use RGB, Hex or specifically named colors when adding custom colors.

(Very) Advanced Testing Steps

This section is for those looking to create a more robust block theme using theme.json and who are experienced theme developers. This isn’t for everyone! 

If you feel more comfortable with block themes and have ample time to dig into theme.json, try replicating a classic theme. Here are two options that should be fun to dig into but keep in mind any default theme should work well:

As you try to do this, write down what gaps remain, what proves to be the most difficult to do, and what feels surprisingly easy! Share in the comments below so we can learn from your experience. This is intentionally extremely open ended and advanced so don’t worry if you don’t feel up for the challenge. If you want to follow along while someone else explores doing this, check out @mkaz‘s exploration video on learning to create a block theme.

What to notice:

These questions are specifically for the Intermediate and Advanced sections: 

  • Do the colors added to the theme.json file appear with the assigned names visible on hover in the color palette for various blocks?
  • Do the font sizes added to the theme.json file appear with the assigned names and sizes in the font size dropdowns in blocks?
  • Do the colors and font sizes appear correctly when used with blocks in the editor?
  • Do the colors and font sizes appear correctly when used with blocks on the front end?
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 

Leave Feedback by July 14th

Please leave feedback (questions, comments, concerns) in the comments of this post and be sure to note which section you followed. If you’d prefer, you’re always welcome to create issues in this GitHub repo directly for Gutenberg but, for this test, it’s unlikely you’ll need to. However, if you do leave feedback in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, please comment below with the link. 

Join a hallway hangout for theme.json testing on July 7th

To help those who might want to explore this test and theme.json in a group, @daisyolsen will be hosting a hallway hangout specifically for this exercise. If you have never attended a hallway hangout, you can read more about them here. Ultimately, they are meant to be casual and collaborative sessions to bring like minds together. 

Hope to see you there. 

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing call #6: Stick the landing (pages)

This is the sixth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program and a very important one leading up to 5.8! If you haven’t been able to participate yet, now is a great time to do so. If you’re excited to help with future efforts, check out the upcoming program schedule

For more information about this outreach program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Feature Overview

A lot has changed since the first call for testing focused on Template Editing so, if you’re worried about this being a repeat experience, don’t be. As a reminder, Template Editing Mode is the feature of Full Site Editing that unlocks the ability to switch between editing an individual’s post/page content and the template that an individual post/page uses. When this first was released, you were only able to edit a template but you couldn’t create a new one or assign a post/page to use a specific template. At this point though, you can create a new template, edit current ones, and select which template you want to use for pages/posts. Tied to this, the interface has been updated to make it clearer when you’re actually in template editing mode. For a deeper dive into this new feature, check out this video that goes more in depth.

To make this a tiny bit more realistic, we’re going to pretend we’re creating a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. site with a custom landing page to attract visitors from another event to join the WordCamp you’re hosting. 

Image of a landing page with a pretend event description, coupon code, and various call to action buttons.

Testing Environment 

While there’s more information below to ensure you get everything set up properly, here are the key aspects to have in place with your testing environment: 

  • Use a test site. Do not use a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site
  • Use the latest version of WordPress (downloadable here).
  • Use the latest version of the TT1 Blocks Theme
  • Use the latest version of GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ (10.6 as of writing this).

Generally speaking, please use the latest versions of each part of the setup and keep in mind that versions might have changed since this post was shared.

Testing FlowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context
 

Important Note: 

While this call for testing is focused on testing a specific feature, you’ll likely find other bugs in the process of testing with such a betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. feature! Please know any bugs you find are welcome in your report for testing, even if they aren’t directly applicable to the tested feature. 

Known issues:

While creating this call for testing, a few issues popped up that you too might experience as you go through this. Rest assured they have been reported. Here’s a non exhaustive list of the most serious items:

Known issues are expected to be found at this stage in development for something that’s so actively being iterated upon!

Setup Instructions: 

  1. Have a test site using the latest version of WordPress. It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install the TT1 Blocks theme by going to Appearances > Themes > Add New. Once installed, activate the theme. 
  3. Go to the website’s admin.
  4. Install and activate the Gutenberg pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party from Plugins > Add New. If you already have it installed, make sure you are using at least Gutenberg 10.6.
  5. You should now see a navigation item titled “Site Editor (beta).” If you don’t see that in your sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme., you aren’t correctly using the Site Editing experiment. Do not click on this as we will not be exploring the Site Editor for this test!

Creating pages

  1. Under Pages, select “Add New” and, one by one, create three pages back to back with the titles “About”, “Contact”, and “Code of Conduct”. Publish each. These don’t need content added in as they will simply be links for a future menu. 
  2. Create a fourth page, title it something fun to bring people into your event and don’t add in any additional content. For example, I titled mine “Feeling inspired from WordCamp Couch?”. 
  3. Publish the page and keep it open.

Creating a new template

  1. In the sidebar, open the Settings and select Page Settings (you should see Page and Block). Select “New” under the Template section to create a new template. Here’s a short video in case you get stuck. 
  2. Title the new template “WordCamp Outreach”.
  3. From there, you’ll enter Template Editing Mode. 

Customizing the template

  1. Remove the Site Title, Site Tagline, and Separator blocks at the top of the template. 
  2. Add in a Cover Block above the Post Title Block and use any image you’d like. I downloaded this one when creating this test. You might need to use the “Insert Before” option in the toolbar of the Post Title Block.
  3. Once you have an image added, select the Cover Block once more rather than the Paragraph Block inside it and use the width options to make it Full Width. 
  4. Drag and drop the Post Title Block into the Cover Block. 
  5. Center the Post Title Block using the block alignment settings and delete the extra Paragraph Block beneath it. 
  6. Select the Cover Block once more and apply a Duotone FilterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to it. Here’s a screenshot of what icon you’re looking for. Note that by selecting “Shadows” and “Highlights” you can select your own custom colors! 
  7. Add a Spacer Block underneath the Cover Block and set it to 50px. 
  8. Add a Columns Block underneath the Spacer Block and choose 50/50. 
  9. Once inserted, select the parent Columns Block and set the width to “Full Width”. 
  10. Add in brief information about your event in the first column and set any alignment you’d like. 
  11. In the second column, add in two buttons asking people to Apply to Speak and Apply to Sponsor. For the purpose of this test, it’s okay if these do not actually link anywhere. Feel free to customize the buttons to your liking too!
  12. Underneath the Columns Block, add in an additional Cover Block and select a background color. 
  13. Once you have a color, select the Cover Block once more rather than the Paragraph Block inside it and use the width options to make it Full Width. 
  14. Inside the Cover Block, add in a discount code message and a Button Block below it encouraging people to buy tickets. Customize this text to your liking, whether in terms of alignment, custom colors, or more. 

Create a custom footer

  1. Underneath the second Cover Block, add a Template Part Block and select “New Template Part” to create a custom footer for this template. 
  2. Once created, head to the Block Settings in the sidebar to add in a Title under the Advanced section, set the Area to “Footer” under the Advanced section, and toggle on “Inherit Default Layout” under the Layout section. 
  3. From there, add a Columns Block into the Template Part and choose 30/70.
  4. In the first column, add the Site Logo block. If you need a logo to use, here’s a free one to download from www.logodust.com
  5. In the second column, add a Navigation Block and start empty. Of note, you will likely run into this bug that’s already been reported here
  6. Using the Page Link option, add in your  “About”, “Contact”, and “Code of Conduct” pages. Customize the Navigation Block to your liking!
  7. From there, select “Update” and save your changes. 

Create a new page & assign the new template

  1. At this point, head back to your wp-admin dashboard and, under Pages, create a new page. 
  2. Add a title that references another pretend event that someone might attend. For example, “Feeling inspired from WordCamp Bed?”
  3. In the Post Settings, under the Template section, select the template you just created and publish the page. 
  4. View your page and confirm it’s using the same template as your first page! 

Advanced Steps

If you’re more technical and keen to test out future ideas, check out this PR. Keep in mind that you can always download the specific Gutenberg plugin version for this PR here to make it easier to explore. For context, this PR seeks to help better differentiate between when you’re editing post content vs the template by obscuring the ability to edit the post content when in template editing mode. Feel free to leave your thoughts on this PR in the comments below or on the PR directly. 

Testing Video

Note that there are chapters added to the video that correspond with the steps above.

What to notice:

Remember to share a screenshot of what you created if you’re up for it!

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • Did you find any features missing?
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • Did you find that what you created in Template Editing Mode matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?

Leave Feedback by May 26th

Please leave feedback in the comments of this post. If you’d prefer, you’re always welcome to create issues in this GitHub repo directly for Gutenberg and in this GitHub repo for TT1 Blocks. If you leave feedback in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, please do still comment below with the link. If you see that someone else has already reported a problem, please still note your experience with it below, as it’ll help give those working on this experience more well-rounded insight into what to improve. 

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing Call #5: Query Quest

This post is the fifth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program. For more information about this experimental program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Feature Overview

Not many blocks get an entire milestone dedicated to them but the Query Block did! As the name implies, this is a pretty powerful blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. allowing you to display posts/pages on your site and customize them as you see fit. For example, you could easily use this block to show off all of your favorite recipes by setting it up to show a specific categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging. of posts. In the long run, you can expect this to be more of a theme author tool used when building a block theme with block variations, like the Post List Block, being more of what users will interact with. For now though, let’s be adventurous and go on a Query Quest to explore what this block can do. 

If you find yourself interested in the future of this block, check out this recent GitHub issue asking for new ideas for the bundled Query Block patterns that come with the current iteration of the block and get excited about Gutenberg 10.5 which will offer more patterns to choose from.

Testing Environment 

While there’s more information below to ensure you get everything set up properly, here are the key aspects to have in place with your testing environment: 

  • Use a test site. Do not use a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site
  • Use the latest version of WordPress (downloadable here).
  • Use the latest version of the TT1 Blocks Theme
  • Use the latest version of GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ (10.4 as of writing this).

Generally speaking, please use the latest versions of each part of the setup and keep in mind that versions might have changed since this post was shared.

Testing FlowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context
 

Important Note: 

While this call for testing is focused on testing a specific feature, you’ll likely find other bugs in the process of testing with such a betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. feature! Please know any bugs you find are welcome in your report for testing, even if they aren’t directly applicable to the tested feature. 

Setup Instructions: 

  1. Have a test site using the latest version of WordPress. It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install the TT1 Blocks theme by going to Appearances > Themes > Add New. Once installed, activate the theme. 
  3. Create eight posts with two different categories and featured images of your choosing. Alternatively, you can download and import the demo Gutenberg content created especially for this test via the WordPress importer under Tools >  Import.
  4. Go to the website’s admin.
  5. Install and activate the Gutenberg pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party from Plugins > Add New. If you already have it installed, make sure you are using at least Gutenberg 10.4.
  6. You should now see a navigation item titled “Site Editor (beta).” If you don’t see that in your sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme., you aren’t correctly using the Site Editing experiment. From there, make sure you are in the Index template (this should be the default upon opening).

General Testing Instructions:

  1. Using the List View, select the parent Query Block and then remove this entire block. This will allow us to start fresh! Here’s a GIF that shows how to do this. 
  2. From there, where the Query Block used to be, add in a Columns Block and set up 2 columns with 50/50 spacing.
  3. In the first column, add a Heading Block with the name of one of the Categories of posts. If you used the demo content, this will be either “Hikes” or “Travel”. 
  4. Add a Query Block just below the Heading Block. During the setup, select whichever option you want from the various sizing options.
  5. Once inserted, open the Block Settings and under “Settings” turn off the “Inherit query from URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org”. 
  6. From there, you should see options to customize what posts this Query Block includes. Under “Filters”, please select one of the categories to display. If you used the demo content, this will be either “Hikes” or “Travel”.
  7. After the Query Block is showing the posts from just one category, proceed to customize the Query Block as you’d like! For example, you can add in additional blocks like Post Author and customize it using the Block Settings option. If you get stuck here, please jump down to the “Customization Instructions/Ideas” for help. 
  8. Follow the same process with the second column and customize the additional Query Block. Make sure to select the second category of posts to display so you see new posts there!
  9. View your site and see if what you created matches the Site Editor view. 

If you’re looking for more ways to customize the experience, try changing the width of the columns, adding in additional relevant blocks, changing colors, and more. 

Customization Instructions/Ideas:

Because this is a more advanced block, here are some additional instructions to help clarify how customization of this block works in case you’re getting stuck. To start, keep in mind that part of the beauty of the Query Block system is that any change you make to one of the posts/pages being queried will be made to the entire set being displayed. This might be confusing at first but it allows for consistency across each post. With that in mind, here are some additional ways to customize your Query Block:

Of note, each of these videos are done using the Small size option but you can choose whatever size option you’d like!

What to notice:

Remember to share a screenshot of what you created if you’re up for it!

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • Did you find any features missing?
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • Did you find that what you created in the Site Editor matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?

Leave Feedback by May 5th, 2021

While other calls for testing have been open for two weeks, this is open for three weeks in order to see if it causes more feedback to come in. If you can help test, please amplify by sharing this post!

Please leave feedback in the comments of this post. If you’d prefer, you’re always welcome to create issues in this GitHub repo directly for Gutenberg and in this GitHub repo for TT1 Blocks. If you leave feedback in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, please do still comment below with the link. If you see that someone else has already reported a problem, please still note your experience with it below, as it’ll help give those working on this experience more well-rounded insight into what to improve. 

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing Call #4: Building a restaurant themed header

This post is the fourth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program. For more information about this experimental program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Feature Overview

Creating an intuitive headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. is a key piece to get right when building a site. It helps orient visitors to what your site is about and, ideally, should help them take the actions you want them to. With the Site Editor, there are now brand new opportunities to customize this to your liking! This test will explore doing exactly that by creating a slightly more complex and layered header using various FSE blocks. To better focus this test, we’re going to pretend we’re restaurant owners and try to create an experience that nudges someone to order online while still showing them the information they need. 

Like the last test, if you choose to get super creative, please share a screenshot in your comment so we can celebrate what you’ve made. For inspiration, here’s my example:

Image showing a restaurant themed header with a button to order online, a brief menu, hours of service, and the site title.

Testing Environment 

While there’s more information below to ensure you get everything set up properly, here are the key aspects to have in place with your testing environment: 

  • Use a test site. Do not use a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site
  • Use WordPress 5.7 (downloadable here).
  • Use the TT1 Blocks Theme
  • Use GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 10.2.1 (latest version)

Testing FlowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context
: Creating a restaurant header

Here’s a basic flow to follow when testing this specific feature. If anything doesn’t make sense, comment below! If you want to take the test further, know that you’re welcome to do so as the instructions are meant to help guide you, not constrain you.

Important Note: 

While this call for testing is focused on testing a specific feature, you’ll likely find other bugs in the process of testing with such a betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. feature! Please know any bugs you find are welcome in your report for testing, even if they aren’t directly applicable to the tested feature. 

Known Issues:

While creating this call for testing, a few issues popped up that you too might experience as you go through this. Rest assured they have been reported. Here’s a non exhaustive list of the most serious items:

Setup Instructions: 

  1. Have a test site using WordPress 5.7. It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install the TT1 Blocks theme by going to Appearances > Themes > Add New. Once installed, activate the theme. 
  3. Go to the website’s admin.
  4. Install and activate the Gutenberg pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party from Plugins > Add New. If you already have it installed, make sure you are using at least Gutenberg 10.2.1.
  5. You should now see a navigation item titled “Site Editor (beta).” If you don’t see that in your sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme., you aren’t correctly using the Site Editing experiment. 


Testing Instructions:

Helpful Hint: As you go through this test, you might find the List View helpful while navigating between content.

Setting up your columns:

  1. Navigate to the “Site Editor (beta)” view. This will automatically open the site editor to the template powering your homepage. 
  2. Upon opening your homepage, remove the Navigation BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. found inside the Header Template Part. This is to help reset the header to add more to it later on. 
  3. Select the parent Columns Block and, using the Block Settings in the sidebar, change the columns from 2 to 3 columns. 
  4. Return to the Columns Block and using the Block Toolbar settings make sure it’s set to Full Width.
  5. In the first column, customize your Site Title and tagline as you wish! This could mean changing the text, font size, font family, and more. 
  6. In the second column, use a Paragraph Block to add in the hours of operation for your pretend restaurant and edit to your liking once more.
  7. In the third column, add a Navigation Block and select the “Start Empty” option.
  8. From there, use the Link Block to add a few links, even if they are to pages that don’t exist yet. To do this, just start typing a title that doesn’t currently exist on your site. For example, “Menu”. You’ll then see an option to create a draft page. Do this for at least one menu item. Remember to have fun with this and make it restaurant-themed!
  9. At this point, select “Update Design” to save the changes you made. 

Creating a nudge to order online:

  1. Once your three columns have the content in place, add another Columns Block above it and select two columns to show using the 70/30 option. You can do this by selecting the Columns Block using List View and using the three-dot menu to select “Insert Before.”
  2. Using the Block Toolbar, make the columns full width, so it stretches across the entire site. 
  3. In the larger column, add a Paragraph Block with text encouraging users to order online. 
  4. In the smaller column, add a Button Block that says “Order Online”. If you want to, feel free to quickly create a page to link to, but it’s okay for this test not to have a link for the purposes of this test.
  5. At this point, select “Update Design” to save the changes you made. 

Customize your colors & publish any page drafts:

  1. From here, customize your colors and anything else with your design! You can do this by selecting the entire Header Template and adjusting the color settings in the sidebar. As you do this, keep note of anything you wish you could do but can’t. 
  2. When things are satisfactory, select “Update Design” to save the changes you made. 
  3. Finally, open the Navigation Toggle > Dashboard to view your wp-admin dashboard. Head to Page > All Pages and publish any that need to be.
  4. View your site and check to make sure that what you created matches what you see there.  
  5. Share your experience in the comments below or in GitHub directly. You’re welcome to run through the experience multiple times to capture any additional feedback!

Testing Video:

This video doesn’t go into great detail in terms of customizing the colors but does walk through each step to get a sense of the major actions to take. Feel free to take the test further as you see fit!

What to notice:

Remember to share a screenshot of what you created if you’re up for it!

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • Did you find any features missing while creating the header?
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • Did you find that what you created in the Site Editor matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?

Leave Feedback by April 12th, 2021 (previously April 8th)

Please leave feedback in the comments of this post. If you’d prefer, you’re always welcome to create issues in this GitHub repo directly for Gutenberg and in this GitHub repo for TT1 Blocks. If you leave feedback in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, please do still comment below with the link. If you see that someone else has already reported a problem, please still note your experience with it below, as it’ll help give those working on this experience more well-rounded insight into what to improve. 

#core-editor, #fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #usability-testing