WCUS Gutenberg Testing: Volunteer Feedback

During WCUS, we had a ton of volunteers staff the Gutenberg testing booth (affectionately called the “Gutenbooth.”) A huge thank you to everyone who volunteered their time and ran tests throughout the weekend!

At the end of the weekend, we asked volunteers for some feedback about common trends they saw, along with recommendations for improving the testing process. Here’s the feedback we received:

Did you see any issues come up repeatedly while you were watching people test?

  • Aligning caption citation, converting paragraphs to list, changing block type when clicking into “Write your story”.
  • Typing the quote into the paragraph block, then trying to format it to match. The ability to change the block type was surprising info, as was the quote block having different styles available.
  • People couldn’t find the second quote style.
  • Right aligning quote blocks instead of changing the quote style.
  • People didn’t realize they should use the quote block type.
  • People didn’t know there were two quote styles.
  • May be more issues of the test itself, but most often people didn’t think to make the text style a quote block. They would be looking for font controls. If they did discover blocks sometimes they wouldn’t see the quote block.
  • No one really noticed the second quote style. They were more likely to find the Block settings, so maybe we move the quote style options to the quote > Block > Settings for easier discoverability.
  • People often missed the existence of the Quote block and used two Paragraph blocks instead, and when they did find the Quote block, they often didn’t know they could select different quote styles.
  • It feels like there are too many places for block settings. The icon for the second quote style was unclear. Some people didn’t know it was a quote and made paragraphs and styled those. Developers added inline CSS to make it match the design.
  • Insert block and then edit was not default mindset (at this point). Discovery of the ability to transform wasn’t strong.
  • There were plenty of issues with people not finding block creation or navigation intuitive. block controls cover up the previous block bottom line of text. If it’s a short line of text you might not see it at all. People sometimes got confused thinking their text was gone.
  • Undo/Redo is not intuitively discovered.
  • It wasn’t obvious what was behind the three vertical dots.
  • /slash commands could be interesting to search and use. We may consider a walk-thru wizard for new users to get them acquainted with now the new blocks can work.
  • Some tech glitches.
  • Mostly related to the test setup (e.g. not knowing to switch tabs to Gutenberg / switch tabs back to finish survey).

tl;dr: The two separate quote styles were the biggest pain point, followed by trouble learning the editor and block interface, particularly switching blocks, the ••• menu, and block controls.

Is there anything you think we should change about the test?

  • I suspect part of the issue with caption alignment was due to the task of the test to be imitation, not creation, so I think it leads people to think in terms of alignment, not necessarily style.
  • Make the screenshot not achievable using Gutenberg / Provide people with content and let them do much more free-form style.
  • Maybe written instructions instead of asking people to “mimic” output, because it this is not the way people write content in general, they do not “copy” something.
  • I’d have the sample printed out and set next to the laptop to keep the user from having to swap between windows.
  • Automate screen recording start/stop, one-button reset for survey etc.
  • Yes. I think expecting people to know they should be recreating a block quote without telling them that is what it is, skews the test results a bit. We need to try to replicate a more natural publishing process somehow.
  • No, this was a good example to make people search for options and solutions.

tl;dr: Imitating an existing design make people focus too much on the details and not as much on the editing experience, we need to print out whatever instructions we provide, and better automation.

If you attended WCUS and ran through the Gutenberg usability test, we’d also love your feedback with how you think the test can be improved!

#gutenberg, #wcus

Gutenberg Usability Testing at WordCamp US

Hello folks! We’re going to be running a Gutenberg usability testing station at WordCamp US, and are looking for volunteers to help staff the testing booth throughout the conference.

Volunteers will:

  • Welcome people interested in testing Gutenberg.
  • Set up testers with the Gutenberg test survey, the Gutenberg testing site, and start the provided screen recording app.
  • After the test is complete, save the test recording and reset everything.
  • Chat with testers about their experiences and their thoughts on Gutenberg, taking notes where possible.

Shifts are a half-hour each and you can sign up for as many as you think you can commit to. If you’re interested and available, you can sign up here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1GxtoZT3ztCf3NzpXbcGEP8zfWczwvceW-tpEDSVZ0Go/edit?usp=sharing

We’ll be using pre-set tests. Folks will have limited time and attention, so we want to get them in and out of the booth in a timely manner. For more information, check out these previous posts from @annaharrison:

Hope to see you there!

+make.wordpress.org/core
+make.wordpress.org/design
+make.wordpress.org/community

#gutenberg, #wcus

Gutenberg Usability Testing Plan – Feedback Needed

We are getting ready to roll out a new round of usability tests for Gutenberg mid-November. In this next round, we will focus on testing writing flow. We are also very keen to widen the net for participant feedback, including testing with participants who are not current WordPress users.

In order to make this happen we have drafted a usability testing plan – and we need your feedback and suggestions (in the comments below) before the next meeting in #core-flow on Thursday 9 Nov at 18:00 UTC. The next steps will be to test the user test on a small sample set (week of Nov 10th), refine at the #core-meeting on  Tuesday 14 Nov 17:00 UTC, and roll out to a wider audience starting from 15th Nov.

We will also have a usability testing section at WCUS, so if you are attending please drop by the and join in!

Proposed Usability Tests

To test the flow of writing, we propose to construct a three part usability test:

  1. General demographics:  including prior WordPress experience, age and device used. This information will help us to segment findings
  2. The main task: participants will be asked to re-create the post shown in an image. There will be three images to select from, mapping roughly to a beginner, intermediate and advanced level
  3. Follow up questions: a few questions about the experience of re-creating the post

Participants will be optionally invited to upload their screen recording, and answer a few questions about their video footage.

Testing Script

Question 1: Do you currently use WordPress?

  • Yes
  • No

Question 2: Would you describe yourself mostly as a…

  • Developer
  • Designer
  • Blogger
  • Business Owner
  • Other: ________

Question 3 (optional): How old are you?

  • Under 18
  • 18 – 30
  • 31 – 40
  • 41 – 50
  • 50 – 60
  • Over 60

Question 4: What device are you using?

  • Mobile phone
  • Tablet
  • Laptop
  • Desktop

Question 5: Let’s get set up!

Check that you have the following items ready as you will need them to complete the task

  • Open Gutenberg editor in a new browser window
  • Ensure that you have the Twenty Seventeen theme selected
  • Open the task image in a new window [ beginner | intermediate | advanced ]
  • Start a screen recording
  • Remember to talk out loud as you complete the task

Your task is to re-create the page that you see in the image using the Gutenberg editor. Remember to start your screen recorder, and talk out loud as you complete the task! When you are finished, continue on to answer a few questions about your editing experience.

Question 6:  Did the task take long or shorter than you expected?

  • It took longer than I expected
  • It took about the amount of time that I expected
  • It took less time than I expected

Question 7: Can you tell us why?

Question 8: Was the task easier or harder than you expected?

  • It was harder than I expected
  • It was about what I expected
  • It was easier than I expected

Question 9: Can you tell us why?

Question 10: Are you more or less likely to use the Gutenberg editor in the future?

  • I am not likely to use Gutenberg in the future
  • I am unsure
  • I am likely to use Gutenberg in the future

Optional section: screen recording analysis

It would help us out a lot if you could upload your screen recording and answer a few questions about your recording

Question 11:  Save your screen recording, and upload your file here…

Question 12: How long did it take to complete the task?

Question 13: Was the title added correctly?

  • Yes
  • No

Question 14: Was the quote added correctly?

  • Yes
  • No

Question 15: Was the image added correctly?

  • Yes
  • No

Question 16: Where were the main sources of friction?

Thank you so much for your help!

If you would like to be kept in the loop with the progress of Gutenberg testing, please leave us your email below and we will add you to the Make.WordPress user testing mailing list

Test Setup

The test can be completed by a participant, or used as a run sheet for an observational research session.

In order to complete the test, participants will need to:

  1. Get their hands on a device (laptop, tablet, desktop or mobile device)
  2. Ensure that they know how to do a screen recording on the device
  3. Load up the user test
  4. Follow the instructions in the test
  5. Upload the screen recording to the cloud
  6. Optionally, code the results from the screen recording
  7. Optionally, write up a blog post and tell us what you found

Reporting usability test results

There are three ways in which you can report back your user test results:

  1. You can simply answer all the questions in the test instructions. Remember to upload your screen recording at the end
  2. You can optionally analyse your screen recording footage by answering the optional questions in the final section of the test instructions
  3. In addition, you are welcome to write up your test results in a blog post

Get Involved

Have an idea on how to improve the usability testing plan? Have your say in the comments below before the next meeting in #core-flow on Thursday 9 Nov at 18:00 UTC. Once we have collected all feedback we will post a link to the test script and open the call for user testing!

 

#gutenberg, #usability-testing

Gutenberg usability testing meeting three

Last week we had a usability meeting. The meeting time wasn’t good for everyone, so let’s change the time this week.

When? Tuesday 31st October 19:00 UTC.
Where? wordpress.org Slack #core-flow: the testing channel.
Who should come? Anyone interested in helping test Gutenberg, all skill levels welcome.

Last week we talked about plans for testing. We will continue that conversation this week.

#gutenberg

Gutenberg usability testing meeting two

Some work has already been doing after our first meeting, which you can find out about here. It’s time to build on that work, let’s have another meeting.

When? Tuesday 24th October 18:00 UTC
Where? wordpress.org Slack #core-flow: the testing channel
Who should come? Anyone interested in helping test Gutenberg, all skill levels welcome.

#gutenberg