Help Wanted: Test WordPress 6.0

It’s coming – WordPress 6.0 is scheduled for release on 24 May 2022. And to make it there we’re calling all testers 📣 to kick the tires and help ensure its 400+ updates and 500 bug fixes handle like a dream.

For a list of when each pre-release build will be available, check out the WordPress 6.0 Release Schedule. And drop on by the #core-test Slack channel for a quick Howdy, where we’ll be running scheduled team meetings, as well as impromptu test scrubs throughout the release cycle.

Table of Contents

Testing Environment

Please only test on a development siteDevelopment Site You can keep a copy of your live site in a separate environment. Maintaining a development site is a good practice that can let you make any changes and test them without affecting the live/production environment. and not on a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer., or use a tool like this to set up a development site.

Once your development site is set up, please install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin and configure it to:

  • Update channel: “Bleeding edge”
  • Stream options: “BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. only” (you may need to save channel changes before this option appears)

If you need more detailed steps, here are the full instructions.

Testing Tips

At a high level, there are a few tips to keep in mind to get the most out of helping to test:

  • Test across different browsers.
  • Test in different languages.
  • Compare features on different screen sizes, including tablets and mobile.
  • Use just your keyboard to navigate, or use a screen reader.
  • Test with both blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. and classic themes.

Important Note: Anything marked as [Technical] is best for those comfortable with more advanced testing steps.

Key Features to Test

The following list identifies some important new and modified features in WordPress 6.0, and should be the focus of testing efforts from here through release day. Items identified as [Major] constitute functionality that requires the most review.

Editor

Style Switching with Variations [Major]

Building on WordPress 5.9’s Styles interface, the editor now supports multiple style variations, enabling site owners to easily switch between a theme’s default or custom designed styles. Styles can be applied to the base site, or to any block. Variations can also be pre-configured by theme authors in theme.json.

With WordPress 6.0 Beta 3 or newer and the Twenty Twenty-Two (TT2) theme active, you’ll have access to preview and test the Styles variations feature.

For detailed steps around how to test Styles, please see this previous call for testing and the official Styles documentation.

For any block theme authors, please see this post to learn more about how to adopt and test this feature.

Expanded Template Types [Major]

We’ve received a lot of constructive community feedback regarding template types that were introduced in 5.9, and this area continues to evolve, introducing author, date, categories, tag, and taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. types. You can find each of these template options in the Site Editor when viewing the overall Templates List:

For detailed testing steps on creating custom templates, please see this previous call for testing.

Easier Template Part Creation [Major]

Now site editors can add existing or create new template parts and patterns with the block inserter (using the + icon or typing / at the start of the block):

For information on testing this feature, please see this previous call for testing.

Writing Improvements

Numerous general improvements that can streamline content creation debut in 6.0. Here are some new features to help test directly: 

  • By popular demand, select text across multiple blocks (it’s like magic).
  • Pick a pattern on page creation. Start with Twenty Twenty-Two, but you can also try this with other themes.
  • Wikilink style internal link completer shortcut, for quick internal links. Trigger with [[ inside a text block.
  • Customize buttons and ensure that styles for new buttons are copied from the adjacent buttons.
  • Gallery block: Add/edit media directly from block toolbar and use gap support to create new layouts. 
  • Improved style preservation between block transforms, and new transform options:
    • Logo to Title
    • ExcerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox. to Content
    • TagTag Tag is one of the pre-defined taxonomies in WordPress. Users can add tags to their WordPress posts along with categories. However, while a category may cover a broad range of topics, tags are smaller in scope and focused to specific topics. Think of them as keywords used for topics discussed in a particular post. Cloud to Categories
    • Calendar to Archives
    • Paragraph to Code
    • Group to Row
  • The Tag Cloud block now supports outline style and min/max font sizes. Find these options in the block sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme..
  • Social icon label visibility can now be toggled.

Try using each of these options in a new post or page and report back any rough points you encounter.

Block Styles Redesign with Preview

It’s now easier to peek into several block styles with a redesigned interface and a snappy hover preview. To test this feature, add your favorite block that comes with several block styles (Quote, Image, Table, etc) open the sidebar, and explore the style options.

List View Enhancements

List View has a few enhancements to explore and give feedback on. For testing, it helps to try out List View in a template or post/page that has different types of blocks and lots of them. Please test the following new options: 

  • Select any block you’d like and List View will open to the exact location.
  • View the structure of your content thanks to a refined interface that shows a collapsed view at default.
  • Use new keyboard shortcuts (shift + click) to select multiple blocks to bulk modify (reposition, delete, etc.), including the ability to drag and drop.
  • Quickly see any locked blocks at a glance thanks to lock status being reflected. 
  • Explore accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) improvements with better keyboard controls and improved screen reader announcements.

To learn more about this feature, see the official List View documentation.

Blocks

Cover Block as Featured ImageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. [Major]

WordPress 6.0 introduces another top item on many a user’s wish list: setting featured images to Cover blocks. Try this feature in conjunction with a template for your posts or page since this means you can now have your Post Title block layered on top of your featured images.

More information on testing featured image cover blocks can be found at PR 39658.

Comments Block [Major]

The comments loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop., once relegated to the world of PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. footer includes, is now a full-fledged block. Add and style comments visually!

For more information on testing the Comments Query Loop block, see this current call for testing.

Block Locking UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. [Major]

Previously only available to theme developers, the power of the block locking APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. is now available to site editors in 6.0. Lock down important blocks to prevent accidental changes. The API now also supports reusable blocks. You can find the locking options in the ellipsis menu of each block:

Testing details can be found as part of the Authoring an Author Template call for testing.

Navigation Block

Progress continues with styling and usability around the Navigation block, which was first introduced in 5.9. Test out the most recent interface improvements and styling options.

More detailed testing information for the latest iteration of the Navigation block can be found as part of the previous Hyping Headers call for testing.

Design

Expanded Block Design and Layout Options

More options and finer-grained layout control can be found with the following list of visual updates. Please explore creating what you can as part of testing and remember that this is just a glimpse as many design tools are already currently available:

  • Use the Group block variations, Stack and Row, to create different layouts. 
  • Select your size when using the Featured Image block.
  • Border controls have been greatly expanded with an updated controls panel.
  • Layout transforms when multi-selecting (new flowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
    Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context
    ) for quick creation.
  • Try to create a customized sidebar with gap support, margins, and typography controls using a Group block in a Columns block.
  • Add borders to Columns blocks.
  • Take advantage of gap support being added to the Gallery Block to have access to a wider variety of layout possibilities.

Theme/PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Development [Technical]

Webfonts API [Major]

The new Webfonts API promises to streamline the registration of locally hosted web fonts, providing theme developers more flexibility and consistency across sites.

As of WordPress 6.0 Beta 3, theme authors are now able to implement webfonts via theme.json, and the official Webfonts API will be available to extenders in a coming version of WordPress.

For implementation and testing guidance on the Webfonts API, please see PR 37140.

Block Theme Export [Major]

Explore the new additions for block theme exports as this feature continues to evolve toward codeless visual block theme building:

Try making changes and exporting in order to ensure those changes are captured correctly. 

Style Switching with Variations [Major]

As mentioned above, the Styles interface now supports multiple variations, which can be preset in a theme. Information on adopting and testing this feature can be found at this previous #core post. Keep in mind that to test this you need to use a block theme that supports this feature and/or add in your own style variation to the current block theme you are using. 

Where to Report Feedback

If you find any issues, it’s best to share them on the alpha/beta forums, or on Trac if you are more technically savvy and comfortable. Please share feedback as soon as you can before the release on 24 May 2022.

A big thank you to @annezazu and @juanmaguitar for reviewing and contributing to this post.

#6-0, #fse-outreach-program, #full-site-editing

Changelog

  • 2022-05-10
    • Added links to forums and TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. for tester feedback.
  • 2022-05-03
    • Noted that builds of WordPress 6.0 Beta 3 and later include TT2 styles variations and bring webfonts support to theme.json.
    • Updated styles variations demonstration video.
    • Clarified that the official Webfonts API will be available in a future version.

FSE Program All Things Media Summary

This post is a summary of the All Things Media exploration for the FSE Outreach Program. Coming out of a pause from 5.9, it was so encouraging and wonderful to see the wider community help out with this exploration in the following ways: 

Shout out to the following folks as first-time contributors to a call for testing: @patrick-b, @ndiego, @beckej, @lidialab. Get excited – you now have a testing contributor badge on your WordPress profile!

High-level summary

While normally, there are some overall sentiments to share, this exploration was so wide ranging it’s hard to pull out a few quotes to ground the following feedback in. Instead, here are some patterns seen across the varying areas below that help bring together the feedback more cohesively: 

  • Emphases on making attribution easy while also allowing for the ability to filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. out images that require it, as few seem keen to use images that would. 
  • Inconsistency with tooling, whether using duotone to select a custom color or trying to crop an image in a gallery blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.
  • Desire for more expansive options, including featured images and adding YouTube videos as a background. 
  • Simplifying layout controls and increase in patterns to make it easier to place your content exactly as you’d like in a HeaderHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. or as a full width visual. 

In each section, the items are divided when appropriate into previously reported vs new categories in order to better understand what was underscored as part of this exploration compared to what was found. 

Confirmed bugs

Listed below are confirmed bugs that break expected functionality or the experience of different features. 

Previously reported: 

New issues: 

The default dimension is highlighted as 100% but in-fact if clicking on 100% again usually modifies the image size on the editor. It is a bit confusing.

@alanjacobmathew in this comment

Feature Requests

Throughout each of these feature requests, there’s a clear desire for better and more consistent tooling, from background support in Group blocks to having a focal point picker for a featured imageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts.. It’s obvious there’s a dance to get right in adding more features while also creating a more consistent and intuitive experience in handling media in the Site Editor. 

Previously reported: 

New: 

Where one can define specifics on upload. Is it a bmp or other none web format have it be converted to a jpg. Have larger images downscaled to a kind of max image size. Etc. 

@paaljoachim in this comment

A uniform way to import images from external sources. There’s some inconsistency here that can be very confusing.

@trynet in this comment.

Having a way to include Featured images in a variety of blocks, such as Cover, would be amazing. This is in scope for 6.0, but it’s the biggest thing I would like to see regarding media and would enable a lot of interesting patterns.

@ndiego in this comment.

However, I would like to see a range of filters available to users. If this is too much for coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., perhaps a standard filter-registration system for developers might be in order.

@greenshady in this WP Tavern post

General Usability Feedback

As seen in other calls for testing, the experience of easily manipulating a Header proved difficult, whether trying to add a background image, trying to get alignments exactly right with your Site Logo, or in using various aspects of duotone. Tied to this, confusion continues around Layout controls with simple tasks like making a Cover block full width proving to be frustrating and further underscoring the need to simplify these concepts. 

Previously reported:

New: 

I went down a weird rabbit hole where I couldn’t figure out why we had the header block and the header template parts. I mean, what if I wanted to have two different headers with wildly different information in them? Whenever I changed the main header block (anything living inside it), it changed it in all the header template parts, and I found that very confusing and frustrating. I ended up removing the header block inside the header templates and keeping things just in groups. That made way more sense to me.

@aurooba in this comment.

I had trouble making my cover image full width. It’s still a bit odd to me that some controls only show up in certain situations, and in this case, because my cover was part of a group, I couldn’t make the cover full width. I’ve been teaching people to use that list view to try to get around that.

@beckej in this comment.

This is tricky and I bet is the hardest step. “Header” is not clearly defined. I bet most folks would go into the Site Editor and try to add a background image to the Header template part block. Also most block-themes have a Group block wrapping the inner content of the Header part, and Group blocks also do not support image backgrounds (yet). So you have to modify the content in your Header by placing it inside of a Cover block and then add a background image to the Cover block. This takes a LOT of in depth knowledge of the Site Editor to accomplish.

@ndiego in this comment.

Say I’m editing the padding dimension, then goes to modify the duotone, the entire right sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. goes to the top(back to media settings) and opens all the closed settings, which affects the user workflow. This also happens when changing the ‘alignment’ to ‘none’ or ‘full width’.

@alanjacobmathew in this comment.

If I insert 2 headers, applying changes to one affects both the header. Don’t know why it is happening.

@alanjacobmathew in this comment.

Thoughts on attribution

We chatted about this on the hallway hangout for this exploration (starting at 16:00 and again around 26:58) with thoughts on how to learn from tools like Pressbooks, how to make attributions more magical by reusing theme styles when adding them, and how to encourage best practices for folks. In general, folks were not keen to use images that required attribution as one can see in the quotes below.

This question evoked a strong negative reaction for me. I don’t know it means that attribution info wouldn’t be removable? Would it be watermarked on the image? Are we talking about metadata. Either way, if you can’t remove attribution from an image visually, I would never use such an image or images from such a resource.

@aurooba in this comment.

As long as we gave end users a few options, I really like the idea of making it easy for others to utilize the open-licensed images, and help guide them to do best practices.

@beckej in this comment.

I understand why this would be necessary in some circumstances, but I personally would not use such an image on my site.

@ndiego in this comment.

It’d be great to have a way from the media library or block settings to append any attribution required AND define where that displayed in templates. I’d like to display the attribution before post comments and after post content.

@courane01 in this comment.

General insights/questions on other photo libraries

We chatted about this on the hallway hangout for this exploration (starting around 24:41) mainly discussing how important it is that an open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. solution rivals a paid one. Generally speaking, folks mentioned the following external image libraries outside of Openverse: Unsplash, Rawpixel, Pexels. Some questions remain as you can see in the quote below:

How might this work for other media types, such as audio and video? Would we want to hotlink it/embed from the source? What’s the risk if the media later is no longer hosted there? But also: hosting many audio and video files within most hosting environments is not ideal. If we make it easier to move mixed media from Openverse to the Media Library, what are the trade-offs?

@courane01 in this comment.

Desire for improved media management

A longstanding conversation in the WordPress project is around having better media management from folders to better filtering and more. This desire held up with a discussion around whether Openverse might be able to solve some of these issues as a media hub. Here’s a video from @paaljoachim expanding on the idea:

This has been a longstanding request in the WordPress community, but better media management in the Media Library (i.e. folders) would be extremely helpful, especially for site with 100s of images.

@ndiego in this comment.

Watch feedback videos

Folks were kind enough to record videos of themselves walking through the experience that I wanted to reshare below as it’s neat to see folks in a great bandwidth medium share their thoughts:

From @paaljoachim.
ExcerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox. from @aurooba stream.
From @beckej.

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-summary, #full-site-editing, #media

FSE Program Testing Call #12: Hyping Headers

This post is the twelfth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program. For more information about this experimental program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more will be shared there. 

Overview

With WordPress 5.9 out in the wild, it’s time to start revisiting some common workflows that we’ve tested earlier versions of that have new tools, options, and more to explore. In the case of this test, we’re going to customize a headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. using everything from the navigation block to template part focus mode to then reuse this personalized header in a different template. Along the way, we explore how patterns are integrated into the experience, new dimension control options, and improved UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it. for the navigation blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.. While going through the experience, think about what would make it even easier and more intuitive to use as that’s ultimately the aim!

Testing Environment 

While there’s more information below to ensure you get everything set up properly, here are the key aspects to have in place with your testing environment: 

  • Use a test site. Do not use a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site
  • Use WordPress 5.9 (downloadable here).
  • Use the Twenty Twenty-Two theme. If you’d like to repeat the test or switch things up, you can always use a different block theme.
  • Use GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 12.6 (latest version). 

Testing Instructions

Setup Instructions: 

  1. Have a test site using the latest version of WordPress (5.9). It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install and activate the Twenty Twenty-Two theme by going to Appearances > Themes. If you choose to use a different block theme, install and activate by going to Appearances > Themes > Add New and searching for the one that has the Full Site Editing  listed as a feature. 
  3. Create four different pages with different titles to add to your menu under Pages > Add New. No content in the pages are needed. 
  4. Install and activate the Gutenberg pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party from Plugins > Add New. If you already have it installed, make sure you are using at least Gutenberg 12.6.
  5. By the end of these steps, you should see a navigation item titled “Editor (betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process.) under Appearance. If you don’t, you aren’t using a block theme and need to switch themes. 

Testing Instructions:

Helpful Hint: As you go through this test, you might find the List View helpful while navigating between content.

These instructions are intentionally more general to help you make the Header you create your own, to find more points of friction, and in case you are using a different block theme. At a high level, you should explore a few things with this test so, if the steps don’t align with what you see, either switch to the Twenty Twenty-Two theme for ease of use if you aren’t using it already or ensure you cover each of the features mentioned in the Overview section. 

  1. Navigate to Appearance > Editor (beta). This will automatically open the site editor to the template powering your homepage. 
  2. Using the List View, select your overall Header provided by your theme. If you’re using the Twenty Twenty-Two theme, you will see that it has provided multiple header options by selecting the “Replace” option in the block toolbar. Select whatever header you’d like to edit. Here’s a screenshot of what to expect here if you have this option.
  3. From there, enter the isolated template part mode to focus just on editing the Header in isolation. You can find this mode by selecting the overall Header template part > Opening the three-dot menu > Selecting “Edit Header”. You can learn more about this mode and the various ways to find it in this post
  4. Once there, build out and customize your navigation block by adding the four pages you created earlier. Keep in mind that you can create draft pages that you will need to publish later in order to have them show up on the front end of your site.
  5. Continue to customize your Header to your liking, whether by using dimension controls in blocks like the Group or Row blocks (depending on what your theme offers), by adding any additional blocks (Site Tagline, Site Icon, etc), or by exploring more options in the navigation block.
  6. When done, select “Back” to return to your homepage template and make any additional changes you might want when seeing the template part in the wider template once more.
  7. From there, select Save and go through the saving flowFlow Flow is the path of screens and interactions taken to accomplish a task. It’s an experience vector. Flow is also a feeling. It’s being unselfconscious and in the zone. Flow is what happens when difficulties are removed and you are freed to pursue an activity without forming intentions. You just do it.
    Flow is the actual user experience, in many ways. If you like, you can think of flow as a really comprehensive set of user stories. When you think about user flow, you’re thinking about exactly how a user will perform the tasks allowed by your product.Flow and Context
    to save all the changes you’ve made. 
  8. After saving, open the W menu > Templates and select another template where you’d like to ensure it uses the Header you just customized (for example, the Blank template). Open that template and, if the Header isn’t in place, add it in however you see fit before saving. 

What to notice:

Remember to share a screenshot of what you created if you’re up for it!

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience work properly? 
  • Did you find any features missing while creating or reusing the Header?
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • What would have made this experience easier and more intuitive?
  • Did you find that what you created in the Site Editor matched what you saw on your site?
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?

Leave Feedback by March 16th, 2022

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Exploration: All Things Media

With WordPress 5.9 shipped, the big pieces of full site editing are out in the open ready for feedback. Rather than digging once more into these pieces for now, let’s leave that to the wider world to absorb and switch into an aspect of site building that can be very make or break: the role of media. Whether it’s setting a featured imageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. or adding a headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. image, there are tons of ways media touches all parts of building a great site. 

Like last time, the focus of this exploration is to think with a more long term, “wishful thinking” perspective in order to gather useful insights that will help inform the design of media related experiences going forward. This is achieved by guiding you through some common tasks for site building with media, and then by asking each of you to creatively think about what you’d like to see happen. Since this is not quite a call for testing due to the lack of flows, focus less on finding bugs (although they are still welcomed) and more on thinking through things you wish would happen.

As you look over the post, remember that you can engage with all of the items or just one of them! Either way, it’s all helpful.

Brief Overview

Part of why we’re doing this call for testing is because there are a few new projects and tools around media in the WordPress project that you might have missed: the WordPress Photo Directory and Openverse. 

The WordPress Photo directory is currently in betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process., and aims to offer a curated source of high-quality images. By adding your photos there, the photos will automatically appear in Openverse, a search engine for openly licensed media with over 600 million items to use free of charge. Right now, these are standalone tools but, in the future, there will be huge opportunities to integrate them directly into the WordPress experience. This exploration will help inform this very early work that’s also in line with various 2022 goals

To read more about the WordPress Photo Directory and Openverse, check out this comprehensive post sharing everything you need to know.

Task 1: Explore what’s currently possible 

These tasks are purposefully open ended as there’s often a few ways to accomplish them. When you respond below, share what approach/steps you took and why! Any bugs you find too, report away in your comment. 

  • Add a duotone filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to a Cover blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. with an image or video in it and add text over top, adjusting the opacity as needed. 
  • Add an image to the background of your header.
  • Add a caption to an image. 
  • Crop or rotate an image in a gallery block. 
  • Add an external non-copyrighted photo to your post as a featured image. Bonus points to share where you searched for the image and where you normally do so.
  • Change the size of your featured image for your posts by editing your post template. 

For this exploration, it would be advantageous to use a block theme since this is meant to capture media in the context of full site editing. As a result, please follow these steps:

  1. Set up a test site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site
  2. Install and activate a block theme from the options listed in the theme directory

Task 2: Describe what you’d like to see

As you go through the above experiences, consider the following questions as a way to reflect on what you’d like to see in the future. This could be everything from being able to use a featured image as a background of a cover block to having more built in controls to style your images to rethinking featured images in general. Don’t hold back and don’t worry about how practical an idea might be. This is just to get a sense of what folks might want to do in the future.   Answer one, all, or none! These are merely to get you thinking in the right framework rather than boxes to check: 

  • How would you like to see Openverse or the WordPress photo directory integrated into the experience?
  • What comes to mind when you think about Patterns and media?
  • What workflow improvements can you think of? What was hard to accomplish? 
  • What basic tasks do you find you have to do outside of WordPress to get your media just right and how would you like to see those tasks integrated into the experience? 
  • How would you feel about using an image where attribution information couldn’t be removed? What about an image where you can not make significant changes?
  • Anything else? Think big!

Please share feedback by Wednesday, Feb 23rd, 2022

As always, thank you for participating in this exercise. If anything is blocking you from doing so, just say so either in #fse-outreach-experiment, in the comments of this post, or over DM in slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. to @annezazu (that’s me!). Keep in mind that not everything shared here will be implemented by the nature of this exploration but know that your ideas will ultimately help shape what is possible going forward. 

Join a hallway hangout on Feb 16th, 2022 @ 5:30PM UTC 

If you want to dig into this exploration more and chat about All Things Media, join @fcoveram and @annezazu in an upcoming hallway hangout. As a reminder, these are casual, open calls that anyone can join and leave as they’d like, have their video on/off, talk or just listen! It’ll last under an hour and will be recapped on Make Test

To join, head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack where a zoom link will be shared at the time of the hangout. 

#fse-exploration, #fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

Help test WordPress 5.9 Features

With WordPress 5.9 slated to ship on January 25th, 2022, this post seeks to consolidate ways for folks to help test specific features that will be included in this release. This is meant to bolster and support overall 5.9 testing efforts. As a result, expect that FSE Outreach Program calls for testing will be on pause ahead of the FSE related features landing in WordPress 5.9.

Important note: Anything marked as [Technical] is best for those comfortable with more advanced testing steps. 

Testing environment

Please only test on a development siteDevelopment Site You can keep a copy of your live site in a separate environment. Maintaining a development site is a good practice that can let you make any changes and test them without affecting the live/production environment. and not on a production/live site. You can follow these instructions to set up a local installLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. or use a tool like this to set up a development site

Once a development site is set up, please install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester Plugin before setting it to: 

  • Update channel to “Bleeding edge”
  • Stream options to “BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. only”

If you need more specific steps, here are more detailed instructions you can follow

Testing Tips

At a high level, there are a few tips to keep in mind to get the most out of helping to test:

  • Try testing across different browsers.
  • Try testing in different languages. 
  • See what features look like on different screen sizes.
  • Try using just your keyboard or a screen reader.
  • Explore using both blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. and classic themes. 

Features to test

Twenty Twenty-Two Default Block Theme

When picking a theme to use for your test site, please try out the Twenty Twenty-Two theme. It’s the very first theme that’s block based and needs thorough testing as a result. Here’s where you can read more about this theme. You can test the theme by installing the Beta and activating Twenty Twenty-Two from Appearance > Themes. To report issues with the theme, you can do so here.

Block theme flows 

Since Block Themes open up the opportunity to edit more parts of your site, new flows have been added to make it more intuitive to access items, like a template editor, where you can make the changes you want to your homepage or 404 page. These workflows and new features need your help to test! 

For detailed testing steps around how best to test these workflows, please follow this call for testing that covers using Styles, Template Part focus mode, and more.

Theme blocks with a focus on the Navigation block

As Full Site Editing is a collection of features that allows more items to be easily edited without knowing how to code, new blocks were created to cover more parts of your site. These blocks are generally called “Theme Blocks” as they match the functionality that used to be in themes. While a number of theme blocks were introduced in WordPress 5.8, there’s always more work to be done, including shipping even more theme blocks in future releases!

For detailed steps around how to test the navigation block, please follow this call for testing that covers creating two different menus. 

For detailed steps around how to general test theme blocks and a complete list of blocks, please follow this call for testing

List View

List view has a few enhancements to keep in mind, including the ability to drag & drop blocks, and the ability to collapse sections to make it easier to navigate complex content. As you explore 5.9, try using List View in various situations to ensure it’s performant and easy to use. 

Design tools

The effort to bring better and more consistent design tools continues to progress with new options added, a more intuitive interface, and more. With just a few combinations of these settings, you can create vastly different layouts from a few simple slight changes to more radical and complex options. 

While a ton of tools have been added to various blocks, there are just a few to focus on for testing:

  • Buttons block: block gap, border controls, dimension controls (padding).
  • Columns block: block gap, dimension controls (padding).
  • Navigation block: flex layout, block gap, layout controls (vertical and horizontal, alignment).
  • Group block: layout controls, dimension controls (padding)
  • Cover block: duotone, dimension controls (padding, min height).
  • Social Icons block: layout controls (vertical and horizontal, alignment), block gap, dimension controls (margin). 
  • Featured imageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. block: duotone, dimension controls (width, height, margin, padding).

Gallery block 

Thanks to a Gallery Block refactor, you can now use the same tools that are available for individual image blocks on each image in the Gallery Block! This added flexibility means you can do more customization – from adding links to each individual image, inline cropping to edit on the fly, apply unique styles for more visually compelling images and apply an array of duotone filters. You can read more about this change

The following items are a high priority to test:

  • [Technical] If you are a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party or theme author that has used the Gallery block previously, please follow the instructions here to ensure you’re prepared for 5.9.
  • Test backwards compatibility by creating a Gallery Block with WordPress 5.8.2 and switching to early releases of 5.9. 
  • Explore using the Gallery Block tools itself. Try cropping images, rearranging, adding alt text, and more. 
  • Test against third party plugins that you might use for galleries and ensure the transformations work. If they don’t, it’s best to contact the third party plugin to let them know.

For additional context, please note that the new Gallery block is included in Beta 1, but the auto migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. of existing Gallery blocks will be in Beta 2. As a result, for Beta 1, you’ll be able to test the new Gallery block by adding a new Gallery, but, in order to migrate an old format Gallery block, you’ll need to do so manually using the Update button in the block toolbar.

Block pattern explorer

The experience of adding patterns from the Inserter just got a refresh with the introduction of a new modal that allows you to see patterns in a more organized way with larger previews. In terms of testing, the items to cover are quite simple:

  • Select and add patterns to your content. 
  • Scroll through different pattern options.

General updates coming to CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.

Outside of these more specific features, there are also some general updates coming to this release that would be advantageous to have tested:

Where to report feedback

If you find any issues, it’s best to share them on the alpha/beta forums, or Trac if you are more technically savvy and comfortable. Please share feedback as soon as you can before the release on January 25th, 2022.

Thank you to @justinahinon @boniu91 @cbringmann @hellofromtonya and @webcommsat for reviewing and contributing to this post.

#5-9, #fse-outreach-program, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing Call #11: Site Editing Safari

This is the eleventh call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program! For more information about this outreach program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more. 

As a reminder, if you’d like to suggest an idea for a call for testing, it’s very welcomed and all ideas will be weighed against current project priorities to figure out what makes the most sense to pursue. You can share ideas directly in the slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel or via DM to me (@annezazu). 

Overview

Feel free to jump straight to the testing steps if you’d prefer to get started right away.

This is the final call for testing before WordPress 5.9, which makes it a wonderful and high impact one to be involved in as it’ll help improve the experience for a large portion of the web before it ever launches. In order to get the most out of this call for testing, the instructions are going to change as the test goes on and as we move forward in the release cycle. For example, at the start of this test, folks will be encouraged to use TT1 and, by the end of the test, Twenty Twenty-Two will be recommended. For now, here’s a high level overview of what is going to be tested:

BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. theme template and template part editing UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing.

While certain calls for testing have ventured into the Site Editor, that experience as you’ve known it is shifting for 5.9 in order to offer a more refined and scaled down experience to manage templates and template parts within a block theme. With a condensed browsing tool and a new placement in wp-admin under Appearance, this might feel more like a taste than the full experience of the Site Editor as you’ve come to know it.  

Styles Interface

While 5.8 laid the groundwork for a cohesive style system, 5.9 sees the introduction of a beautiful user interface that allows folks to interact directly with various style properties. You might have heard of this work under the project name “global styles”! While we’ve had calls for testing around theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML., one of the mechanisms related to the overall Global Styles project, this is the first time Styling itself is being explored. Currently, this interface displays two large groups of design focuses: blocks and elements. Elements represent things that can be styled globally and across blocks (such as “text”, “links”, “captions”, etc). This is a fancy way of saying you can easily change the typography of your entire site or the unique coloring of your buttons block all from the same interface. 

Patterns Explorer

With block patterns on the rise, a new explorer modal has been shipped to make it easier to navigate between patterns and find the exact one you want to use. This sets the groundwork for future integration with the Pattern Directory. This test will briefly explore this new experience.

Twenty Twenty-Two

Twenty Twenty-Two is the latest in a long line of default themes with a twist — it’s a block theme first and foremost built for the various site editing tools. As a result, midway through this call for testing, folks will be encouraged to test using this theme and report back their findings. Read more about this groundbreaking default theme here

Testing Environment 

This will adjust as the test goes on and the release cycle progresses to ensure folks are testing the latest and greatest. 

Here are the steps to follow to properly set up your testing environment for this specific all for testing. If you’re already ready to go, jump to the testing steps below.

  1. Use a test site with the latest version of WordPress. Right now, that’s 5.8.2. It’s important this is not a production/live site. 
  2. Install and activate the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party from Plugins > Add New. If you already have it installed, make sure you are using at least Gutenberg 12.0.
  3. Install the TT1 Blocks theme by going to Appearances > Themes > Add New. Once installed, activate the theme. 
  4. Create a few posts with featured images of your choosing. Alternatively, you can download and import the demo Gutenberg content created previously for these kinds of tests via the WordPress importer under Tools >  Import. You can also follow this lesson for how to use demo content.
  5. Go to the website’s admin.
  6. You should now see a navigation item under Appearance titled “Editor (betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process.)”. If you don’t see that, your environment isn’t correctly set up. If you get stuck here, just comment on this post or ask in #fse-outreach-experiment for help!

Generally speaking, please use the latest versions of each part of the setup and keep in mind that versions might have changed since this post was shared.

Testing steps

Personalize your homepage

1. Go to Settings > Reading and set “Your homepage displays” to show “Your latest posts”.
2. Once set, go to Appearance > “Editor (beta)”. This will open up to show a template that displays your homepage.
3. From there, change your homepage to your liking! This could mean adding in a navigation block, changing the font size of your Post Title Blocks, adding a duotone filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to your Post Featured ImageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts. blocks, removing blocks, adding blocks, and more. 
4. Once you’ve adjusted everything to your liking, click “Save” and go through the saving experience. 

Set your styles 

5. From there, click on the Styles icon in the upper right corner to access the Styles interface. 
6. Once open, personalize the four sections as much or as little as you’d like: Typography, Colors, Layout, and Blocks (to customize individual blocks). For example, you can click on Colors > Palette > Use the + sign to add your own custom color option for use throughout your content. 
7. Once you’ve adjusted everything to your liking, click “Save” and go through the saving experience. 

Add a buttons pattern and use layout controls

8. From there, open up the Inserter and switch to the Patterns tab.
9. Select the “Explore” option, navigate to the Buttons section, and pick the “Simple call to action” pattern.
10. Once added, use the + option to add in a second button. 
11. From there, select the overall parent Buttons block and open the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. settings to customize the layout to your liking. Here’s a quick video in case you get stuck.
12. Save the changes. 

Add a duotone filter to your Archive template

13. Click on the W menu in the upper left hand corner > Under Editor select “Templates” > Select “Add New” > Select “Archive” (currently not possible to create a General template from here).
14. In the content, add in the Post Featured Image block and add in a duotone filter. 
15. Add in any additional blocks you’d like and save the changes when you’re ready. 
16. Head back to your dashboard by clicking on the W icon in the upper left corner before heading to Posts > All posts. 
17. Edit one of your posts with a featured image and assign your updated “Archive” to this post. Here’s a quick video in case you get stuck.
18. Save and view the post to see the filter applied!

Edit your HeaderHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes.

19. Return to Appearance > Editor (beta) and, using List View if you need to, select your Header template part. 
20. Select the three dot menu in List View or in the block toolbar and select “Edit Header”. This will take you to the focused template part mode. 
21. From there, make a few changes to the template part (add items to the navigation block, change the size of your Site Title, etc) and use the horizontal drag handles to see how your header will look at different sizes! 
22. Save the changes.

What to notice:

  • Did the experience crash at any point?
  • Did the saving experience properly save your changes? 
  • Did you find any features missing? 
  • What did you find anything particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience?
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? 
  • What would have made this experience easier? 
  • Did you find that what you created in the editor matched what you saw on your site?
  • How did your content look on a smaller device or screen size? 
  • How do you think this will impact your current workflows? 
  • Did it work using Keyboard only?
  • Did it work using a screen reader?

Leave Feedback by December 7th, 2021

Please leave feedback in the comments of this post. If you’d prefer, you’re always welcome to create issues in this GitHub repo directly for Gutenberg. If you leave feedback in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, please do still comment below with the link. If you see that someone else has already reported a problem, please still note your experience with it below, as it’ll help give those working on this experience more well-rounded insight into what to improve.

Props to @kellychoffman for helping review this call for testing.

Changelog

Nov 10th: updated instructions to use Gutenberg 11.9 RC4.
Nov 12th: updated instructions to use Gutenberg 11.9.
Nov 13th: updated instructions to use WordPress 5.8.2.
Nov 24th: updated instructions to use Gutenberg 12.0, to change the phrasing around the browsing component, and to update the due date.

#fse-outreach-program, #fse-testing-call, #full-site-editing

FSE Program Testing Call #10: Pattern Party

This is the tenth call for testing as part of the Full Site Editing Outreach Program! For more information about this outreach program, please review this FAQ for helpful details. To properly join the fun, please head to #fse-outreach-experiment in Make Slack for future testing announcements, helpful posts, and more. 

As a reminder, if you’d like to suggest an idea for a call for testing, it’s very welcomed and all ideas will be weighed against current project priorities to figure out what makes the most sense to pursue. You can share ideas directly in the slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel or via DM to me (@annezazu). 

Feature Overview

Because Full Site Editing is a collection of features that allows more items to be easily edited without knowing code, new blocks needed to be created to cover more parts of your site. These blocks are generally called “Theme Blocks” as they match functionality that used to only live in themes. While a number of theme blocks were introduced in WordPress 5.8, there’s always more work to be done, including shipping even more theme blocks in future releases! 

This test is focused on pushing these lovely Theme Blocks to their limits to better determine what to prioritize and what features might remain to be documented. To make the experience feel a bit more fun and practical, we’re going to approach this test from the vantage point of creating patterns for blogs using some of these blocks. If you really like what you make, remember you could even register them on your site 🙂 

As a refresher, here’s a rundown of all of the theme blocks ready for testing with a note around which ones are included in WordPress 5.8 in case you’re inspired to use them on your site now:

  • Site Logo: allows you to display and edit the site logo [shipped in 5.8].
  • Site Tagline: allows you to display and edit your Site Tagline [shipped in 5.8]. 
  • Site Title: allows you to display and edit your Site Title [shipped in 5.8]. 
  • Query LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop.: allows you to display posts and pages in various formats [shipped in 5.8]. 
  • Post Title: displays the Post Title [shipped in 5.8].
  • Post Content: displays the contents of your post [shipped in 5.8]
  • Post Date: displays the post date [shipped in 5.8]
  • Post ExcerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox.: displays the post excerpt [shipped in 5.8].
  • Post Featured ImageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts.: allows you to display and edit the featured image of your post [shipped in 5.8]
  • Post Categories: displays the categories of a post [shipped in 5.8]
  • Post Tags: displays the tags for a post [shipped in 5.8].
  • Login/out: displays login and out links [shipped in 5.8].
  • Page List: displays a list of all pages on your site [shipped in 5.8]
  • Template Part: allows you to display and edit various global regions of your site (headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on differ