Resolved Posts plugin activated & widgets added; Learn Roadmap Proposal

Over the last two weeks, I’ve been working with the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team on the preferred way to collect and track non-technical roadmap or wishlist items for the the Learn WordPress initiative. I had initially proposed adding these as issues in the Learn GitHub repository. Concern was raised that we shouldn’t ask non-technical users to make a GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ account or learn how to use GitHub to be able to comment or contribute ideas. We talked though several options before arriving on the solution I’m sharing with you today.

The Resolved Posts pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party has been installed on this site. The plugin adds a button at the bottom of each published post (when viewing on the front of the site) which toggles through three states: no value, to do (unresolved), and done (resolved). Unresolved posts have a red stripe on the left down the length of the post. Once resolved, the stripe will be green.

The 5 oldest unresolved posts will appear in a new Unresolved widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. of this site. I’ve gone through all of the posts on this site and cleared the unresolved flag from posts that were informational or very old. I’ve commented on the four remaining posts that were unresolved asking for feedback to see if they should remain unresolved.

For the Learn WordPress roadmap items, each items should be created as a post on this site and include the #learn-roadmap tag. After publishing the post, mark it as a To Do. When viewing the #learn-roadmap tag page, a widget can be seen in the sidebar showing unresolved #learn-roadmap posts. This widget will also appear when viewing any post with this the #learn-roadmap tag. Going forward, I suggest we adopt the following:

  • if consensus to proceed with the idea is reached, an issue should be opened on the GitHub repository and a top comment be added with a link to the issue
  • once the GitHub issue is complete, the roadmap post can be marked resolved.

Please comment below if there is a better way to transition from roadmap post to GitHub issue for the developers to work on. I’ll leave this open for input until October 2, 2020.

Proposal: Workshop Submission and Review Process for Learn WordPress

Since we’ve been talking about moving beyond events when it comes to online WordPress content, and there’s an application form available for anyone who would like to assist with reviewing submitted workshops, this is a good time to discuss the submission and review process for workshops submitted to the Learn WordPress platform, which is intended to be hosted on learn.wordpress.org.

This process needs to be simple enough that it doesn’t discourage people from submitting their content, and open enough so that reviewers can collaborate on the process effectively. Here’s a proposal for how this could work:

Step 1: A presenter submits their workshop details in a custom form, which saves their details as a new post in the same post type that published workshops are stored in, but in draft status. This will sound familiar to WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organisers as it’s exactly how WordCamp session submissions work.

Step 2: Reviewers are given a user role that permits them to edit posts in the workshop post type (possibly editor or a custom user role if necessary). They can log in to review the workshop and leave notes on it as needed. These notes can be viewed by other reviewers to facilitate collaboration in the process.

Step 3: For a workshop that is approved, the reviewer would then request any additional info from the presenter (likely using the support@wordcamp.org Help Scout instance for communication), and inform them that they should go ahead and record the workshop. This means that presenters don’t unnecessarily spend the time recording content that is not going to be used.

Step 4: The recorded workshop (hosted on WordPress.tv), along with any other missing info, is added to the post and it is scheduled to be published if it passes a final review of the content itself.

This process enables collaboration between reviewers and minimises any friction in the process.

Feedback

  1. Does this process sound open and collaborative enough for this kind of platform?
  2. Is there anything that you would change in the steps outlined above?

I have also added this as an issue on the Learn WordPress GitHub repository, so any relevant discussion and points from this post will be copied over there to update that proposal.

#learn-roadmap

The Learn WordPress workshop reviewer application is here!

After much brainstorming, reflection, and discussion we’ll be adding non-synchronous workshops to our inspirational and educational content in addition to the online meetups and events we’ve all grown accustomed to over the past several months. This exciting new effort is explained and discussed in greater detail in a recent post.

Later this month we’ll begin releasing new pre-recorded content aimed at educating and engaging both new and longterm WordPress users. While the content itself is sure to be fantastic, it’s just the starting point. Once the workshop content has been made available and community members and users have watched and learned from it, we will launch a discussion group, or series of discussion groups, to greater explore the content of each workshop.

Yesterday I announced the application to submit Learn WordPress workshops. Today I’m excited to share with you the application to be a workshop reviewer.

Workshop reviewers will review applications for workshops in their area of expertise and in the language(s) in which they’re fluent and make recommendations on whether the workshops should be created and shared in the Learn WordPress project.

Continue reading

#community-team, #learn-roadmap, #workshops

The Learn WordPress workshop presenter application is here!

After much brainstorming, reflection, and discussion we’ll be adding non-synchronous workshops to our inspirational and educational content in addition to the online meetups and events we’ve all grown accustomed to over the past several months. This exciting new effort is explained and discussed in greater detail in a recent post.

Later this month we’ll begin releasing new pre-recorded content aimed at educating and engaging both new and longterm WordPress users. While the content itself is sure to be fantastic, it’s just the starting point. Once the workshop content has been made available and community members and users have watched and learned from it, we will launch a discussion group, or series of discussion groups, to greater explore the content of each workshop.

Continue reading

#learn-roadmap, #workshops

Showing online workshops in the Events Widget

This post is similar to @iandunn‘s post, “Showing Online WordCamps in the Events Widget”, but in this case we are talking about Community workshops. The topic has come up because of the Diverse Speaker workshop on April 14-16. Other online global community workshops are likely to follow.

In the second Community Team chat Thursday, we were discussing how to promote this Speaker workshop. I suggested it could be possible to use the Events WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user.. Some discussion occurred in #meta-wordcamp as well which parallel’s Ian’s post.

A few differences to note from online WordCamps:

  • This workshop is being organized from Vancouver. I think the location of the organizers should be ignored since a typical radius would exclude potential interested participants.
  • This workshop will be held April 14-16 for one hour each at 1800 UTC / 2pm EDT.
  • This workshop will be offered in English.

I propose similar questions to Ian’s post, with a few modifications.

Questions

  1. Should Community Team online training workshops show up in the widget?
  2. If so, who should they be shown to? Here are a few potential criteria:
    • Everyone within a timezone where the event would occur between 8am – 8pm in the user’s local timezone.
    • Everyone who speaks the same language — or locale? — as the workshop.
    • A combination of the above? Some other criteria entirely?
  3. Should the timezone and/or language of the event be displayed in the dashboard?

+make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.
+make.wordpress.org/coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.

#events-news-widget, #online-events, #learn-roadmap