What’s new in Gutenberg?

This new release completes some cool additions to the editor. It includes the ability to create reusable templates by selecting multiple blocks in the editor. It then allows exporting and importing these templates using a JSON file transport. There’s also a visual diff mechanism for comparing options when a block was detected as invalid (which could scale in the future to improved UX for revisions as a whole), toolbar groups can be defined as collapsible into a dropdown to better organize available block controls.

Showing visual comparison and reusable templates

There’s also the addition of a much clearer drag handle for drag and drop block operations next to the block arrow controls. It’s also possible to convert an image into a cover image and back, retaining the caption as the main text among many other small improvements and fixes.

3.9 🍒

Mobile Native

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s new in Gutenberg? (12th September)

The release this week, apart from numerous improvements and fixes across the board, includes a new “full screen” mode, and improved mechanisms for styling blocks from a theme perspective. It also exposes the custom post type used to store reusable blocks from the block inserter as a way to manage saved blocks in bulk — an often requested feature. There are plans to expand on the possibilities here so stay tuned for the next series of updates.

Showing Toolbar improvements and Full Screen Mode

It brings news in the data parsing flow as well. Having a formal specification of the Gutenberg block grammar has allowed us both to maintain a stable core during the almost 40 releases of the plugin and lately to allow competing parser implementation to evolve and be compared in terms of performance and correctness. In concrete terms, we are shipping a new default implementation that is hundreds of times faster than the spec and has been stress tested with really long posts (including Moby Dick). These tests are also available for anyone to run against. Memory consumption has also gone down dramatically for server side operations. I’d like to specially thank Dennis Snell and Ivan Enderlin for their great work improving this area.

3.8 🥖

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s New in Gutenberg? (31st August)

Our final update for August aims to add further clarity to some core interactions, as well as fixing many issues. Notably, we are expanding on the previously called “Fixed Toolbar” mode — now named Unified Toolbar — as an optional mode for a more traditional writing environment. In our testing, this mode tends to be preferred by more experienced users who don’t mind the disconnect between the tools and the content blocks. There’s also an additional setting which focuses the editing experience on a single block at a time, as well as de-emphasizing some of the block boundaries. These tools can be combined at will to better suit personal preferences and creative workflows.

There are many improvements to individual blocks, conversions, templates, and interactions. We want to say thank you again to everyone who is engaging, raising concerns or making suggestions, and collaborating in making the project better with each release.

Updates to the Block Switcher Menu

3.7 🛵

Mobile Native

3.6.2

3.6.1

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s new in Gutenberg? (17th August)

The release this week introduces a few significant user experience improvements. The inserter has been tweaked to accommodate new icons for all core blocks (with core embeds showing the icon for the corresponding service), more visual breathing room, and better handling of searches with diacritics. The new icons aim to encourage people creating their own blocks to supply their own SVG—the hope is to make sure we can avoid multiple cases of duplicated icons diminishing the overall ability to quickly scan blocks.

The publishing flow has been updated to show the tag input panel and post format selector before publishing. Previewing should also be a bit more robust in handling the new tab.

A new help modal—showing all available keyboard shortcuts—has also been added. Several shortcuts have been introduced: inserting a new block before / after the current block, toggling the inspector settings, removing a block, and showing said help menu.

Likewise, there are several bug fixes, notably for IE11 users.

Showing the new keyboard shortcuts panel.

3.6 🥒

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s new in Gutenberg? (9th August)

Another update has sailed! This one comes after WordPress 4.9.8 release with the “try the new editor” notice, which has increased the number of installs from 15k to more than 120k in a few days. This is an important milestone as we broaden the testing horizons. We’d like to take a moment to thank everyone that has tested and given feedback through the various channels.

Likewise, huge thanks to everyone that has helped answer questions, addressed forum feedback, triaged new issues, fixed bugs, and generally jumped in to contribute.

Back to the release, this one includes several fixes, polish, and cleaner interactions around the writing flow. On the developer side, there’s been work around refining and adding to the pool of APIs and documentation.

Showing updates to some UI components.

3.5 🥥

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

“Try Gutenberg” Callout in WordPress 4.9.8

WordPress 4.9.8 will contain the “Try Gutenberg” callout, encouraging site owners to install the Gutenberg plugin, to test how their existing content and plugins works with the block editor. It also presents the option of installing the Classic Editor plugin, should they feel that they need more time to prepare for switching over to the block editor.

Screenshot of the “Try Gutenberg” callout in place on the Dashboard.

In WordPress 4.9.8, the callout will be shown to the following users:

  • If Gutenberg is not installed or activated, the callout will be shown to Admin users on single sites, and Super Admin users on multisites. (Based on the install_plugins capability.)
  • If Gutenberg is installed and activated, the callout will be shown to Contributor users and above. (Based on the edit_posts capability.)
  • If the Classic Editor plugin is installed and activated, the callout will be hidden for all users.

Actions and Filters

The callout is attached to the try_gutenberg_panel action. If you would like to remove it on sites that you administer, you can do so with this snippet:

remove_action( 'try_gutenberg_panel', 'wp_try_gutenberg_panel' );

The “Learn more about Gutenberg” link currently directs to https://wordpress.org/gutenberg (or your localised version). However, particularly for hosts, you may have special instructions for your customers to install Gutenberg. In that case, the try_gutenberg_learn_more_link filter allows you to change this link, like so:

function my_host_learn_more_link( $link ) {
    return '<a href="https://support.my.host/gutenberg">Learn more about Gutenberg at My Host</a>';
}

add_filter( 'try_gutenberg_learn_more_link', 'my_host_learn_more_link' ); 

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s new in Gutenberg? (30th July)

Today’s release is timed to coincide with the upcoming WordPress 4.9.8 release, and includes a multitude of improvements when converting existing content to blocks.

3.4 🎟

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s new in Gutenberg? (20th July)

Today’s release continues to improve multiple areas of Gutenberg, its behaviours and tools. Most of the updates are around refining the experience and strengthening the API surface, but there’s also a couple new server rendered blocks added to the library. There are also multiple packages being extracted as the APIs mature. Many thanks again to all the contributors!

Archives and Recent Comments blocks

3.3 🥝

Deprecations removed with this version.

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s New in Gutenberg? (6th July)

This release generally completes our MVP feature set for the editor by adding inline images, block style variations, and a new columns approach. Switching focus to bugs, enhancements, compatibility, and API stability from now on. Worth noting that there’s people working on some more individual blocks (a few widgets and playlist) to be included when ready.

The most significant addition is block style variations. This will allow registration of alternate styles (based on class names) for any block, with automated real thumbnails and live previews built in to the block transformation tool. We have added them to the Quote, Button, and Separator blocks for illustration. The public API will be exposed in a future release.

Block Style Variations

3.2 🥚

All Updates

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg

What’s New in Gutenberg? (21st June)

Coming back from a great WCEU, it was cool to see a lot of examples of what people are already building with Gutenberg and the overall sense of shared enthusiasm.

This release includes a new system for walking a new user through the interface via tips. There’s also a new iteration of the block sibling inserter that continues the effort to consolidate all the multiple interactions that are possible while reducing UI weight.

Previewing and auto-saves has also gotten a lot of work, improving the auto-save mechanism and allowing to preview changes to already published posts. There’s also a lot of bug fixes, details, improvements, and tightening of components and APIs. For example, creating a shared block from an HTML block now defaults to be in preview mode when a user inserts it.

3.1 🥦

#core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg