Devchat summary, July 28, 2021

A week after the release of WordPress 5.8, @desrosj led a well attended but quick chat on this agenda.

Highlighted blogblog (versus network, site) posts

Jonathan drew the group’s attention to these posts:

He also added a late post of his own:

If you’d like to help with 5.8.xx minor releases, leave a comment on that post.

To-do items on 5.8

Moving on, @desrosj opened one last review of the 5.8 release and asked the group for retrospective comments and other feedback.

In reply, @chanthaboune said she’d likely have her retrospective up later in the day. And she said @matveb will shortly have some thoughts about features to target for 5.9.

Remember, also, that trunk is open now, so if you’re a committercommitter A developer with commit access. WordPress has five lead developers and four permanent core developers with commit access. Additionally, the project usually has a few guest or component committers - a developer receiving commit access, generally for a single release cycle (sometimes renewed) and/or for a specific component., keep committing whatever you feel is ready! (Ed. note: Plus, we’re also in alpha for 5.9, so whether you’re a committer or not, if you’re passionate about bringing a new feature into CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., now is the time to do what it takes to land it.)

Component maintainers

@sergeybiryukov checked in with news on Build/Test, where ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #53363 has details on some bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes and updated naming to follow established conventions.

On U[grade/Install, Sergey added a second plug for his feedback request on the updater proof of concept highlighted above.

Open Floor

Above, in highlighted posts, you probably noticed that @desrosj asked for comments on his minor-releases post if you want to help with the 5.8.x minors. He actually added that suggestion in Open Floor.

#5-8, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

WordPress 5.8 ‘Tatum’ Retrospective

A lot of things changed with the way that the WordPress 5.8 release was managed. A retrospective is always a good idea after a project, but in this case I wanted to be sure I cataloged the big changes for anyone who felt that it was different, but couldn’t quite put words to it. I originally shared this with the release team in Slack.

  • The teamwork had a different feeling. Instead of having buddies or cohorts of learning contributors (roughly one-to-one), we put the squad in a public channel to coordinate the work (one-to-many).
  • The release process had a different feeling. We made feature freeze independent of any other type of milestone and also are trying to be more focused about what work is done in each phase.
  • The included features had a different feeling. Instead of flipping the switch on a massive change for everyone, full site editing is being being shipped in smaller, more manageable chunks so it’s easier to catch up and we can iterate as we go.
  • The environment is different. We’ve all been struggling through this pandemic and being isolated from those we care for. Whether we recognize it or not, that has a profound impact on what we choose to do with our spare time, how we are able to meet others where they are, and whether we “grow through” or “bounce back” from hurdles that stand in our way.

Anyone is welcome to participate in this retro, so please take a few moments to fill in the form or leave public feedback in the comments below. It is not anonymous in case I need some clarification, but your email address will not be kept. The form will be open until August 15, 2021.

Thank you everyone for your contribution to this release, and thanks in advance for taking the time to help make future releases even better!

#5-8, #retrospective

Consistent minor release squad leaders for each major branch: Trial run retrospective and 5.8.x releases

During the 5.8 release cycle, a Release LeadRelease Lead The community member ultimately responsible for the Release. and Release Deputy was named for all 5.7.x releases in a trial run. The experiment was an attempt to address several pain points that made executing minor releases needlessly difficult. Each of the pain points of the minor release cycle were expanded in detail in the original post.

For the 5.7.x releases, @peterwilsoncc and @audrasjb were named as Release Lead and Release Deputy respectively. In the months between the 5.7 and 5.8 releases, they successfully planned and released 2 minor 5.7.x versions with an average of 4.5 weeks between each. The gap between the final minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality. (5.7.2) and 5.8 was 9.7 weeks.

Feedback

In an effort to evaluate how this process went, they were asked for some answers to a handful of questions. Here is some collected feedback from @peterwilsoncc on how the process went.

What went well?

Generally I thought the experiment was successful and it was good to be able to concentrate (and only be expected to concentrate) on the minor releases rather than try to track both major and minor. More specifically:

  • Getting a few more people in the AEST timezone involved than usual helped with coordination.
  • Starting early my time for releases was good for the .1 version as it went longer than expected.
  • Probably should have asked for author rather than contributor permission on w.org/news so I could actually publish the posts I prepared.
  • Having scripts prepped a day in advance was great at reducing stress and allowed for dry-runs (excluding commit).

What went poorly?

  • Night owls or not, I don’t think it was great having me in APAC and @audrasjb in EU working as team leads, everything that was good about release times for me was exactly the reverse for @audrasjb (and @desrosj but to a lesser extent).
  • Better prep on the .1 release could have shortened the time for committing and moving on to the release party.
  • Needed to pull in a couple of people on the release day for the .1 release.
  • Finding someone with mission control access is not easy (especially in timezone). The list of those with permissions is really out of date, and some probably don’t need release permission any more.
  • I didn’t delegate some of the adminadmin (and super admin) stuff well and ended up doing a fair bit at the last minute as a result (on me for not asking).

What did you learn?

  • How to release GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ packages, although doing so on my first production commits to the repository was a little brave.
  • Depending on the number of security backports, and how far back they need to go, release day for a minor can be busier than a major.
  • Process page in the handbook is quite out of date: updated a few steps after each of the two releases.

What support did you receive?

A lot.

  • @gziolo and @isabel_brison helped a great deal with getting the Gutenberg release process down, especially @gziolo by updating the undocumented steps as I asked questions.
  • @audrasjb, @desrosj and @whyisjake with release processes, both in advance and on the day.
  • Code review of shell scripts to attempt to speed up the process.
  • @dd32 with release day stuff, including catching quite a few things I was unaware of on the day.


What support could you have used?

Needed a lot more support from editor team with some planning tasks. The team was consumed with 5.8 and Full Site Editing, so they did not have much time to spare.

What were some responsibilities or tasks you had to take care of that you did not anticipate?

  • Expected I’d need to prep some release day scripts, but didn’t realize how many until I started doing them. Again, probably would have been helped by better delegation
  • Didn’t realize I’d need to do NPM releases at the start but figured it out well before the actual release

Anything else you feel is worth sharing?

Generally I think it went well and was successful.

Continuing the trial in 5.8.x releases

Because the experiment was generally successful, it will be repeated in 5.8.x releases. To reiterate the ideal criteria that was listed in the original proposal, the two contributors serving as release lead and release deputy will be responsible for:

  • Publishing timelines and plans for each minor release.
  • Executing these plans through release day.
  • Coordinating with the Security Team lead to improve the flow of fixes from the team to users.
  • Assembling and requesting help from other volunteers for each release as deemed necessary (docs, test, specific focus areas, etc.).

Ideally, one of these two contributors has a technical background (with the abilities to identify, confirm, test, and approve bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes and changes), and the other has a project manager or coordinator background (with the abilities to create release timelines, coordinate contributors, and help unblock efforts).

One additional (potentially optional) criteria would be that either the lead or deputy be a part of the previous major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.’s squad, or be very familiar with the changes that were introduced in that major release. This would further increase the speed at which the minor releases are able to fix related bugs, as they are already “up to speed” on the changes.

In recent years, the gap between major releases has been, on average, 3 to 5 months. If necessary, contributors can tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.) in and out of the role should circumstances change and it becomes necessary.

If you’re interested in volunteering as a Release Lead or Release Deputy for the 5.8.x releases, please comment below!

Props @peterwilsoncc and @audrasjb for their great work during the 5.7.1 and 5.7.2 releases, and @chanthaboune for pre-publish review.

#5-7, #5-8

Dev Chat Agenda for July 28, 2021

Here is the agenda for this week’s developer meeting to occur at July 28, 2021 at 20:00 UTC.

Blogblog (versus network, site) Post Highlights

5.8 Review

Components check-in and status updates

  • Check-in with each component for status updates.
  • Poll for components that need assistance.

Open Floor

Do you have something to propose for the agenda, or a specific item relevant to the usual agenda items above?

Please leave a comment, and say whether or not you’ll be in the chat, so the group can either give you the floor or bring up your topic for you accordingly.

This meeting happens in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack.

#5-8, #agenda, #core, #dev-chat

A Week in Core – July 26, 2021

Welcome back to a new issue of Week in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. Let’s take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between July 19 and July 26, 2021.

  • 24 commits
  • 23 contributors
  • 103 tickets created
  • 18 tickets reopened
  • 68 tickets closed

Please note that as expected, WordPress 5.8 was released last week, on Tuesday July 20, 2021 🌟

Ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. numbers are based on the Trac timeline for the period above. The following is a summary of commits, organized by component and/or focus.

Code changes

Build/Test Tools

  • Rename classes in phpunit/tests/widgets/ per the naming conventions – #53363
  • Rename classes in phpunit/tests/sitemaps/ per the naming conventions – #53363
  • Rename classes in phpunit/tests/blocks/ per the naming conventions – #53363
  • Move and fix incorrectly placed tests for blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. supported styles – #53363
  • Use better assertions in WP_UnitTestCase_Base::assertEqualFields(): – #53363
  • Modernize the WP_UnitTestCase_Base::assertEqualFields() method: – #53363
  • Correct placement of the $message parameter in assertDiscardWhitespace()#53363
  • Add a $message parameter for custom assertions in WP_UnitTestCase_Base#53363
  • Correct class name for WP_Filesystem_Base::find_folder() tests – #53363
  • Update PHP_CodeSniffer to version 3.6.0 – #53477

Bundled Themes

  • Version Bump 2010, 2011 and 2012 – #53777
  • Bundled Themes: Use correct path for loading images in block patterns – #53769
  • Twenty Ten: Use correct path for loading block patterns – #53752

Media

  • Check the posts_per_page value in wp_ajax_query_attachments() before using it as a divisor – #53773
  • Media: Remove unused code from wp-admin/includes/media.php#53764

Documentation

  • Miscellaneous docblockdocblock (phpdoc, xref, inline docs) corrections and improvements – #53399
  • Add a comment about the $title global usage in various adminadmin (and super admin) files – #53729
  • Correct a comment about WebP constants in wp-includes/compat.php#53680

Help/About

  • Add / character to img and source tags – #53716

Internationalization

  • Fix broken loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. in WP_Theme_JSON_Resolver

Editor

  • Conditionally load registered styles for block variations – #53616

External Libraries

  • Correct the underscore version used when registering – #53713
  • Correct the jquery-form version used when registering – #53714
  • Correct the hoverIntent version used when registering – #53715

Props

Thanks to the 23 people who contributed to WordPress Core on Trac last week: @jrf (5), @audrasjb (4), @sabernhardt (3), @david.binda (3), @hellofromTonya (2), @aristath (2), @SergeyBiryukov (1), @schlessera (1), @TobiasBg (1), @ankitmaru (1), @radixweb (1), @rtm909 (1), @GaryJ (1), @dd32 (1), @ravipatel (1), @peterwilsoncc (1), @loranrendel (1), @ryelle (1), @rudlinkon (1), @youknowriad (1), @kapilpaul (1), @2linctools (1), and @johnbillion (1).

Congrats and welcome to our 5 new contributors of the week! @radixweb, @rtm909, @loranrendel, @rudlinkon, and @2linctools ♥️

Core committers: @sergeybiryukov (17), @desrosj (3), @gziolo (2), @peterwilsoncc (1), and @johnbillion (1).

#5-8, #week-in-core

Dev Chat Agenda for July 21, 2021

Here is the agenda for this week’s developer meeting to occur at July 21, 2021 at 20:00 UTC.

Blogblog (versus network, site) Post Highlights

5.8 Schedule Review

Components check-in and status updates

  • Check-in with each component for status updates.
  • Poll for components that need assistance.

Open Floor

Do you have something to propose for the agenda, or a specific item relevant to the usual agenda items above?

Please leave a comment, and say whether or not you’ll be in the chat, so the group can either give you the floor or bring up your topic for you accordingly.

This meeting happens in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack.

#5-8, #agenda, #core, #dev-chat

A Week in Core – July 19, 2021

Welcome back to a new issue of Week in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. Let’s take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between July 12 and July 19, 2021.

  • 37 commits
  • 35 contributors
  • 53 tickets created
  • 15 tickets reopened
  • 51 tickets closed

Please note that WordPress 5.8 will be released tomorrow on Tuesday July 20, 2021 🌟

Ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. numbers are based on the Trac timeline for the period above. The following is a summary of commits, organized by component and/or focus.

Code changes

Application Passwords

  • Improve various user-facing and developer-facing terminology – #53503, #53691

Build/Test Tools

  • Update the caniuse browser data and regenerate CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets.#53277
  • Clean up skipping conditions and requirements for various tests – #53009
  • Correct the test for autosaving a post with Ajax – #53363
  • Replace assertContains() with assertStringContainsString() when used with strings – #53363, #46149
  • Require the WP_REST_Test_Controller class in WP_REST_Controller tests – #53363
  • Reset $current_screen global between tests to avoid cross-test interdependencies – #53431
  • Use more appropriate assertions in rest_sanitize_request_arg() tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53123, #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363
  • Use more appropriate assertions in various tests – #53363

Bundled Themes

  • Revert the [51372] update to blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. patterns in bundled themes – #53617

Coding Standards

CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings.

  • Don’t always set normalizedTransitionendEventName to null#53562

Documentation

  • Correct documentation for wp_get_post_parent_id()#53399
  • Synchronize the $post_id argument description for some post and attachment functions – #53399
  • Various documentation fixes following [51129]#44314

Editor

  • Second round of package updates ahead of RC3
  • Backportbackport A port is when code from one branch (or trunk) is merged into another branch or trunk. Some changes in WordPress point releases are the result of backporting code from trunk to the release branch. fixes targetted for WordPress 5.8 RC4 – #53397
  • Include the fixes targetted for WordPress 5.8 RC3 – #53397

Help/About

  • Update the About page for 5.8 – #52775
  • Update the About section for 5.8 – #52775

Media

  • Document edge cases with the new image_editor_output_format filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output.#5366, #53668, #35725
  • Fix JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. error in Media Library when infinite scroll enabled – #53672
  • When resizing WebP images set the compression to “lossy” by default. Fixes a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. where the compression was set to “lossless” when the uploaded WebP images have extended file format (VP8X) – #53653

Privacy

  • Ensure the copy button actually copies the suggested privacy policy text – #53652, #52891

Upgrade/Install

  • Add additional files to $_old_files for 5.8 – #53367

Widgets

  • Prevent widgets unintentionally being moved to the inactive sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme.#53657
  • Replace wp.editor references in the legacy text widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user.#53437
  • Use wp_sidebar_description() to retrieve a sidebar’s description#53646
  • Validate HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. before saving block widgets

Props

Thanks to the 35 people who contributed to WordPress Core on Trac last week: @desrosj (6), @SergeyBiryukov (4), @jrf (3), @peterwilsoncc (3), @hellofromTonya (3), @adamsilverstein (2), @javiarce (2), @talldanwp (2), @zieladam (2), @timothyblynjacobs (2), @mikeschroder (2), @antpb (1), @denisco (1), @milana_cap (1), @karmatosed (1), @audrasjb (1), @nao (1), @kevin940726 (1), @noisysocks (1), @jorbin (1), @johnbillion (1), @mukesh27 (1), @kapilpaul (1), @youknowriad (1), @ianmjones (1), @mcsf (1), @get_dave (1), @ellatrix (1), @walbo (1), @dd32 (1), @htmgarcia (1), @linux4me2 (1), @mmxxi (1), @wildworks (1), and @spacedmonkey (1).

Congrats and welcome to our 3 new contributors of the week! @htmgarcia, @linux4me2, and @mmxxi ♥️

Core committers: @sergeybiryukov (16), @desrosj (12), @youknowriad (2), @ryelle (2), @johnbillion (1), @joedolson (1), @azaozz (1), @mikeschroder (1), and @peterwilsoncc (1).

#5-8, #week-in-core

WordPress 5.8 Release Day Process

We’re less than 24 hours away from WordPress 5.8! If you would like to help with the final steps of the release, here is how you can join in.

The current plan is to start the release process at Tuesday, July 20, 2021 1500 UTC in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel.

The major version release process can take a bit more time than the Betas or Release Candidates do, particularly if we run into any last minute issues that need to be addressed.

The Release Process

We will be working through the Major Version Release process for anyone who wants to follow along. Earlier today the pre-final release dry run was coordinated in #core (Slack archive).

How You Can Help

A key part of the release process is checking that the ZIP packages work on all the different server configurations available. If you have some of the less commonly used servers available for testing (IIS, in particular), that would be super helpful. Servers running older versions of PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher and MySQLMySQL MySQL is a relational database management system. A database is a structured collection of data where content, configuration and other options are stored. https://www.mysql.com/. will also need testing.

There are two ways to help test the package:

  • Use WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ to test: wp core update https://wordpress.org/wordpress-5.8.zip
  • Directly download the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process./RC version (e.g., https://wordpress.org/wordpress-5.8.zip)

In particular, testing the following types of installs and updates would be much appreciated:

  • Does a new WordPress install work correctly? This includes running through the manual install process, as well as WP-CLI or one-click installers.
  • Test upgrading from 4.0.33, 4.9.18, 5.7.2, and 5.8 RC 4 as well as any other versions possible
  • Remove wp-config.php file and test fresh install
  • Test single site and multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site/networknetwork (versus site, blog) (both subdirectory and subdomain) installs
  • Does it upgrade correctly? Are the files listed in $_old_files removed when you upgrade?
  • Does Multisite upgrade properly?

Finally the following user flows, on desktop and mobile, would be great to validate work as expected:

  • Publish a post, including a variety of different blocks.
  • Comment on the post.
  • Install a new pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party/theme, or upgrade an existing one.
  • Change the site language.
  • If you’re a plugin developer, or if there are complex plugins you depend upon, test that they’re working correctly.

You can even start this early, by running the WordPress 5.8 RC4 packages, which are built using the same method as the final packages.

#5-8, #release-process

WordPress 5.8 Release Candidate 4

In preparation for the final release of WordPress 5.8 on July 20, 2021, an RC 4 has been packaged and released to fix some late-discovered blocking issues. The following changes have been made since RC 3:

  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor: Backportbackport A port is when code from one branch (or trunk) is merged into another branch or trunk. Some changes in WordPress point releases are the result of backporting code from trunk to the release branch. fixes targeted for WordPress 5.8 RC4 ([51445] for #53397).
  • Media: When resizing, WebP images set the compression to “lossy” by default. It Fixes a bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. where the compression was set to “lossless” when the uploaded WebP images have extended file format (VP8X) ([51437] for #53653).
  • Media: Fix JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. error in Media Library when infinite scroll enabled ([51441] for #53672).
  • Media: Document edge cases with the new image_editor_output_format filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. ([51444] for #53667, #53668, #35725).
  • Privacy: Ensure the copy button actually copies the suggested privacy policy text ([51433] for #53652).
  • Widgets: Prevent widgets unintentionally being moved to the inactive sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. ([51439] for #53657).
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#5-8

Dev Chat Agenda for July 14, 2021

Here is the agenda for this week’s developer meeting to occur at July 14, 2021 at 20:00 UTC.

Blogblog (versus network, site) Post Highlights

5.8 Schedule Review

  • RC 2 released last week and RC 3 yesterday, now under hard string freeze
  • Email to pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party/theme authors on Field GuideField guide The field guide is a type of blogpost published on Make/Core during the release candidate phase of the WordPress release cycle. The field guide generally lists all the dev notes published during the beta cycle. This guide is linked in the about page of the corresponding version of WordPress, in the release post and in the HelpHub version page. went out last week
  • No further bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrubs scheduled, so please highlight issues of concern directly in #core
  • 5.8 release in SIX days on Tuesday, July 20th

Components check-in and status updates

  • 5.8 plans and help needed
  • Check-in with each component for status updates.
  • Poll for components that need assistance.

Open Floor

Do you have something to propose for the agenda, or a specific item relevant to the usual agenda items above?

Please leave a comment, and say whether or not you’ll be in the chat, so the group can either give you the floor or bring up your topic for you accordingly.

This meeting happens in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack.

#5-8, #agenda, #dev-chat