X-post: HelpHub Localisation Plan Meeting Notes

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Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on March 21st, 2019

This ticket scrub will happen on 2019-03-21 17:00 UTC in the #meta-wordcamp channel.

The focus is on MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets with the WordCamp Site & Plugins component.

Comment below if there’s a specific ticket or topic you’d like to discuss.

#agenda #ticket-scrub #wordcamp

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X-post: Strengths and Challenges: Organization

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The Block Directory, and a new type of plugin


The pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party directory already has a block section, and there has been some fragmented discussion about expanding or improving it. I’d like to share some thoughts on this and propose a more expansive solution. First I’ll outline some of the main problems that need solving.

Issues:

  • Many plugins already register blocks, but often the plugin name and description doesn’t give a good indication of what those blocks are.
  • There is no way to search by blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. name.
  • Installation of plugins is far removed from the business of using blocks.
  • Developing blocks is a steep learning curve for new and experienced plugin developers alike.

A proposed solution:

Put briefly, I’d like to propose a new type of WordPress plugin that provides blocks and nothing else: Single Block Plugins. These will be hosted in a separate Block Directory section of the Plugin Directory. They will be JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/.-based, and each plugin will register a single Block. And they will be searchable and installable from within the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ editor itself.

Let me break that down with some more detail.

A Single Block Plugin is intended to be a relatively small, simple plugin that provides a single Gutenberg block. The plugin is the block, essentially.

Single Block Plugins are WordPress plugins that conform to a few rules, including:

  • They register a Gutenberg block.
  • They’re written in JavaScript, and are front-end only.
  • They have no UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. outside of the editor.
  • They use a block.json file with metadata as per the Block Registration RFC
  • They include readme.txt and headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. metadata as required.

This is not set in stone; we’ll work out the exact rules in collaboration with plugin developers and the community on Make WordPress Plugins.

The Block Directory will be a section within the Plugin Directory, that contains only Single Block Plugins.

  • It will be separate from the main plugin directory: you’re either browsing regular WordPress Plugins, or Single Block Plugins.
  • Single Block Plugins will be searchable by block name and description, as per the Block Registration RFC.
  • The Block Directory will probably use a simplified version of the plugin page layout for Single Block Plugins.
  • There will be an APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. endpoint for searching blocks by name and description.
  • Inclusion in the Block Directory requires following the rules for Single Block Plugins.

Regular WordPress plugins in the main Plugin Directory can continue to register Gutenberg Blocks.

  • Regular plugins will also be searchable by block name and description.
  • Regular plugins can register as many blocks as they like, and are not required to follow the same rules as for Single Block Plugins.
  • Regular plugins can continue to do all the amazing things they can now, including back-end code, wp-admin UI, and so on.

In other words, Single Block Plugins are for blocks; Regular WordPress Plugins are for anything at all.

Single Block Plugins will be JavaScript-based.

  • The block code will be entirely written in JavaScript.
  • The plugin can contain other assets like images and css.
  • To begin with, Single Block Plugins will contain a single PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. file containing plugin headers and initialization code only. Eventually, this should become unnecessary.
  • They won’t have any back-end code.
  • Any UI will be contained within the editor.
  • We’ll help onboard new (and new-to JS) developers with templates, samples, and other tools.

Single Block Plugins will be searchable and installable from within the Gutenberg editor.

  • The Block Inserter will use the above-mentioned search API to discover and display relevant Single Block Plugins from the Block Directory.
  • Installation will (eventually) be seamless, without leaving the editor.
  • We’ll make use of and improve the block management features that are already on their way into coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress..
  • Obviously this will entail plenty of design, UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it., and accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) work, which will start over on Make Design.
An artist’s impression of what inline installation might look like (thanks Mark!)

This post is intended as a starting point for discussion and new ideas. We’ll post more details on the Plugins, MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress., and Design Make sites in the coming days to focus on those particular areas.

Feature and maintenance update for WordCamp.org: February and March 2019

Here’s a list of the WordCamp.org feature developments and maintenance work that was accomplished in February 2019:

  • Committed code for the first shortcodeShortcode A shortcode is a placeholder used within a WordPress post, page, or widget to insert a form or function generated by a plugin in a specific location on your site.-to-blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. conversion: Speakers
  • Updated wordcamp.org to WordPress 5.1
  • Added 5.1 blog metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. table
  • Removed a duplicate notification to the slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel when a WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. or MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. listing is put into Active/Scheduled status, and already has been put into that status in the past.
  • Reviewed code from community to automate VAT invoices, and proposal from community to build WordCamp.org PWA
  • Made forms-to-drafts compatible w/ Gutenberg
  • Restricted Tagregator date range
  • Added Attendee filtering by flag
  • Automated a check for supporting documentation before allowing reimbursement request to be submitted, to save administrative time
  • Automated reminders to organizers with pending invoices for over 30 days, to reduce our collections backlog
  • Standardized unit test suite to make adding new tests easier
  • Fixed a bug that wiped out WordCamp listing metadata when manually sending an organizer reminder
  • Fixed a bug that was stripping LESS variables from CSS
  • Drafted a proposal to move WordCamp.org to GitHub

Here’s what folks working on WordCamp.org hope to accomplish in March:

  • Complete the rest of the shortcode-to-blocks conversions (Sessions, Organizer, Sponsors, Schedule) — this will probably be the majority of the work in March
  • Continue to give feedback to the teams working on automating VAT invoices and the WordCamp.org PWA.
  • Update global sponsor acknowledgement on ticket purchase emails and landing pages.
  • As always, fix bugs as they are reported and maintain wordcamp.org

#wordcamp

X-post: 5.0 Release Retrospective Kickoff

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Replacing SVN with Git for wordcamp.org’s code

WordCamp.org’s code currently uses SVNSVN Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after its command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system. Software developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation. Its goal is to be a mostly compatible successor to the widely used Concurrent Versions System (CVS). WordPress core and the wordpress.org released code are all centrally managed through SVN. https://subversion.apache.org/. as the primary tool of version control hosted on the Meta SVN repo. For the last several months we have also been experimenting with GitGit Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. Git is easy to learn and has a tiny footprint with lightning fast performance. Most modern plugin and theme development is being done with this version control system. https://git-scm.com/. to see if it improves the development workflow.

Currently there is a GitHub repo which is set up as the mirror of the official SVN repo of WordCamp.org’s code. This repo is used to hold code reviews, and sync with SVN with every  new commit.

So far this setup has been a big help in making it easier to get and give reviews, therefore improving code quality. Many basic features in Git like commit, stash, branch etc have been a delight to use in place of their SVN counterparts because of Git’s decentralized nature.

At this point it’s worth discussing removing SVN altogether, from at least the local development flow. Right now the process is prone to errors, not easy to set up, and has an extra step of manually syncing Git with latest changes in SVN.

New proposed process

It seems like a good idea to change the version control system as follows:

  1. Make the GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repo the primary destination for code reviews. It will be configured on the local system of whoever wants to contribute to WordCamp.org’s code, and will be the primary place to work and develop.

  2. Keep SVN as part of the releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. process. That is, whenever code is deployed changes will be synced from Git to SVN and start the deploy process. This process will be manual (or at least will be triggered manually) and SVN will be used only as a release tool (i.e. aim is not to preserve commit metadata like author, commit message etc). This approach has two main benefits:

    1. No changes to deploy scripts will be necessary to use Git. These script are used while pushing code from latest SVN revision to WordCamp.org’s server. They would continue using SVN as before.

    2. No dependence on an external tool in order to deploy changes. For example, Github going down will not affect us in case we want to push an emergency fix.

Commits with their authors have already been imported from the SVN repo into the Github repo.

Share your thoughts

Do you have any technical concerns about moving from SVN to Git? Do you suggest any changes to the process?

If the development process is indeed changed, it might be a good idea to also think about importing issues from MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. to Github that are reported for WordCamp.org and its components. Do you have any concerns about importing issues into Github, or should they continue to exist in Trac?

Please leave your suggestions and feedback in a comment on this post.

#wordcamp

Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on February 21st, 2019

This ticket scrub will happen on 2019-02-21 17:00 UTC in the #meta-wordcamp channel.

The focus is on MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets with the WordCamp Site & Plugins component.

Comment below if there’s a specific ticket or topic you’d like to discuss.

#agenda #ticket-scrub #wordcamp

+make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//community

X-post: Strengths and Challenges: Follow Up

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X-post: Our Strengths and Challenges

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