HelpHub & Handbooks Localisation

So we had a meeting during WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe 2019 (Berlin) with the following people: @nao @sergeybiryukov @kenshino @itsmarvin @helika @netweb @akirk @estela

In reference to the original discussion post https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/2019/03/27/helphub-localisation-plan-meeting-notes/ and in parallel consultation with @ocean90 about the use of GlotPress (who doesn’t think GlotPress is designed to deal with what we’re proposing), we have agreed on an approach.

  1. We will activate the HelpHub pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party on selected rosetta sites (e.g. ja.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/)
  2. As a start locale teams would be able to transcreate content using the English HelpHub as a basis (https://wordpress.org/support/)
  3. The English HelpHub will remain the source of truth
  4. We’ll devise a proper roadmap following the plugin activation to link the locale HelpHub with the English one. Here’s some things we thought of
    • To track revision numbers across both the original HelpHub and the localised one
    • To have notifications to inform the locale team that the English HelpHub article has been updated
    • To make sure that the HelpHub articles have language links
    • And more

The above steps will also largely apply to the Community Handbook

To request for the activation of the plugin:

Locale teams should create a meta ticket at https://meta.trac.wordpress.org/ and the Meta team can do so provided that

  1. The Documentation Team is kept informed of all localised HelpHub installations
  2. The Community Team is kept informed of all localised Community Handbooks

This is the start towards localised user and community docs!

Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on June 20th, 2019

This ticket scrub will happen on 2019-06-20 17:00 UTC in the #meta-wordcamp channel.

The focus is on MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets with the WordCamp Site & Plugins component.

The timing of this meeting nearly coincides with Contributor Day at WordCamp Europe (it will have just ended). So we may end up focusing on tickets that didn’t quite make it over the finish line earlier in the day.

Feel free to comment below if there’s any other specific ticket or topic you’d like to discuss.

#agenda #ticket-scrub #wordcamp

+make.wordpress.org/community

X-post: Block Library: Initial Explorations

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/design: Block Library: Initial Explorations

Interactive glossary on Make sites

There’s a new glossary feature running on selected Make p2s. It automatically highlights terms that are defined in a Handbook glossary, and on hover gives a popup tooltip with the definition. It looks something like this:

An example screenshot showing the tooltip defining the term “MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.

We’ve enabled the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party on several Make sites to begin with, including Make Meta. It draws its content from two sources: a global WordPress glossary as written by the marketing team, and a local glossary specific to each Make site. Authors and Editors will find a Glossary section in the main menu of wp-admin.

The plugin is of course open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL., and it’s available now in the plugin directory for anyone to use on their own WordPress site.

We’ll gradually enable the plugin on remaining Make sites as we deal with any unexpected issues. Please let the team know in #meta if you find any problems with the plugin or would like it enabled on your team’s P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/..

Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on May 16th, 2019

This ticket scrub will happen on 2019-05-16 17:00 UTC in the #meta-wordcamp channel.

The focus is on MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets with the WordCamp Site & Plugins component.

Comment below if there’s a specific ticket or topic you’d like to discuss.

#agenda #ticket-scrub #wordcamp

+make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//community

Block Plugins and the Block Directory

Over on Make Design, the design project for installing plugins from within Gutenberg is underway.

It’s time to kick off the discussion about blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. plugins themselves. There’s already been some discussion of this on an earlier post about blocks in the plugin directory. That raised a bunch of great points and questions, which this project will attempt to solve.

Goal:

Our plan is to create a new kind of pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, where *the plugin is a block*. These plugins will be familiar to plugin developers, but specially crafted so that they can be safely and seamlessly installed by users from within the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ editor. They’ll be hosted in a special new section of  the existing WordPress plugin directory.

Main requirements:

  • Gutenberg editor designers and developers need a way to search the plugin directory for blocks that can be seamlessly installed.
  • The plugin directory needs to index and show metadata about blocks.
  • Users need a way to make a simple and safe decision about whether or not to install a block.
  • Site administrators need a way to manage the blocks and plugins that are available on a site.
  • Plugin developers need ways to clearly communicate the purpose and features of their plugin blocks.
  • The plugin review team needs to set and enforce clear rules about plugin code and behaviour.

Scope:

  • We’ll be designing the architecture for a new type of plugin that is focused on single blocks. These plugins are blocks.
  • The  new plugin type will be a subset of the existing WordPress plugin architecture, and compatible with the existing install and update systems.
  • The new plugin architecture will have some additional limitations and restrictions over and above regular plugins, such as limited UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. and server-side code.
  • We’ll consider the feasibility of block previews, that could be displayed inside the editor prior to installing the plugin itself.
  • Security implications will be critical.
  • We’ll look at the needs of developers with respect to server-side rendering and coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. APIs.
  • We’re aiming to produce a simple initial version that can be ready in time for the WordPress 5.3 releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software..

Next steps:

  • Scoping the plugin architecture in more detail.
  • Designing the simplest block plugin that could possibly work.
  • Creating a separate section within the plugin directory for block plugins.

When and where to follow along:

  • The fortnightly MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. Chat, every second Wednesday at 2100 UTC (right after the Core Dev chat)
  • Regular discussion in #meta between formal chats
  • Important updates will be posted on Make Plugins and Make Meta

Who is involved:

#block-directory, #blocks

X-post: 5.0 Release Retrospective Wrap Up

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/updates: Comment on 5.0 Release Retrospective Wrap Up

X-post: The Get Involved table at WCEU 2019

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/community: The Get Involved table at WCEU 2019

Next WordCamp.org ticket scrub on April 18, 2019

This ticket scrub will happen on 2019-04-18 17:00 UTC in the #meta-wordcamp channel.
The focus is on MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tickets with the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Site & Plugins component.
Comment below if there’s a specific ticket or topic you’d like to discuss.
#agenda #ticket-scrub #wordcamp
+make.wordpress.org/community

Feature and maintenance update for WordCamp.org: March 18-29, 2019

Here’s a list of the WordCamp.org feature developments and maintenance work that was accomplished in the last two weeks:

  • Continued iterating on WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more.’s shortcodeShortcode A shortcode is a placeholder used within a WordPress post, page, or widget to insert a form or function generated by a plugin in a specific location on your site.-to-blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. conversions
    • Introduced the Organizers block
    • Updates to Speakers, Sessions, and Sponsors blocks
    • Began tracking progress in a milestone
  • Investigated and mitigated two server downtime incidents
  • Fixed a problem with retrieving data about meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. events after Meetup.com made an unannounced change to their APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways.
  • Fixed a bug that wiped out sponsor data in some situations
  • Updated the verbiage in ticket receipts to reflect current global sponsors
  • Began the process of implementing a more reliable cron system on WordCamp.org

#wordcamp

+make.wordpress.org/community