The Plugin Directory gets a refresh

Over the past few weeks, the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has been working on a new theme for the Plugin Directory. This visual refresh is part of the continued effort to establish a consistent design language across WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. The updated site launched today. Congratulations to everyone involved in this effort.

The update’s primary focus was to standardize the site’s layout, fonts, spacing, and colors with other newly updated sections of WordPress.org. This follows the recent Pattern Directory refresh and the Forums refresh launched a few weeks prior. 

Here’s a look at the new homepage, followed by a single plugin page.

The updated homepage versus the current site.
The updated homepage versus the current site.
The updated single pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party layout versus the current site.

Next steps

The Plugin Directory refresh is now live for WordPress.org and all foreign-language sites (Rosetta sites). Some translation work may need to be done for each locale, and that can be managed in the WordPress Plugin Directory project.

It’s important to note that this refresh is not a complete redesign. Over the years, there have been many discussions throughout the community on how the Plugin Directory could be improved—everything from a completely different homepage layout and more data for plugin authors to better search and plugin categorization. The aesthetic updates completed in this iteration do not fundamentally change the Plugin Directory, but they do set the stage for future, more consequential improvements. 

Minor iterations and follow-ups are planned in the next few weeks as the community begins using the directory and any new issues are created. There are also a few accessibility issues that will be addressed post-launch, and I wanted to highlight the following open discussions:

If you find an issue or have suggestions for larger functional changes, please add an item to the WordPress.org issues queue on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ or in Meta Trac

Finally, make sure to join the #website-redesign SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. Thanks!

Props to @laurlittle and @dufresnesteven for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/plugins/
+make.wordpress.org/support/
+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/polyglots/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/
+make.wordpress.org/accessibility/

#website-redesign

The Pattern Directory gets a refresh and is now powered by blocks

Over the past few weeks, the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has been working on a new theme for the Pattern Directory as part of a broader effort to establish a consistent design language across WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. The updated site launched today. Congratulations to everyone involved in this effort.

With this update, the site is now using a block child theme and the shared WordPress.org parent theme, laying the groundwork for future improvements. For now, the main changes were to convert everything to blocks and standardize the layout, typography, and colors. Rosetta sites (for example, de.wordpress.org/patterns, or es.wordpress.org/patterns) have also been updated to use the new design.

The new theme also utilizes the Interactivity API for many user interactions, such as favoriting a pattern, and performance is improved. The site loads in under one second on a high-speed connection, down from about three seconds with the old theme. There is 70-80 percent less JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/. per page, and the page weight is about 40 percent smaller overall. 

Here’s a look at the new homepage, followed by a single pattern page.

The updated homepage versus the previous design.
The updated homepage versus the previous design.
The updated single pattern layout versus the previous design.
The updated single pattern layout versus the previous design.

And here’s a look at the Spanish-language version of the Pattern Directory, which has already been translated. Some translation work may be needed for each foreign-language site, which can be managed in the WordPress Pattern Directory project.

The updated homepage and a single pattern in the Spanish Pattern Directory.
The updated homepage and a single pattern in the Spanish Pattern Directory.

Next steps

As with the recent Forums refresh, this update to the Patterns directory is not a complete redesign and plenty of work remains to be done. However, this iteration is a big step forward, especially for the directory’s underlying architecture, and will unblock larger improvements down the line. Notably, the pattern creation experience remains unchanged but could use an overhaul. An issue has been created, and you can follow along on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/.

Additionally, the Design team has been conceptualizing more substantial improvements in how related patterns can be packaged together and presented to users. The latest designs in Figma explore pattern “bundles” and an improved pattern creation flow. 

If you find an issue or have suggestions for larger functional changes, please create an issue in the GitHub repository or feel free to leave comments on the design explorations in Figma.

Finally, make sure to join the #website-redesign SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. Thanks!

Props to @ryelle and @laurlittle for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/polyglots/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/
+make.wordpress.org/accessibility/

#website-redesign

The Forums get a refresh

Over the past few weeks, the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has been working on a new theme for Forums as part of a broader effort to establish a consistent design language across WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. The updated site launched today. Congratulations to everyone involved in this effort.

In addition to standardizing the structure, fonts, spacing, and colors, the Forums homepage now matches the layout of the newly redesigned Developer Resources section, improving consistency within the Learn section of the site.

Here’s a look at the new homepage, followed by an individual forums page and a single post.

The updated homepage versus the current site.


The updated forums layout versus the current site.


The updated single post layout versus the current site.

Next steps

This refresh is not a complete redesign, and there is still work to be done. Rather, it’s intended to be a quick iteration to set the stage for future improvements. You can view the complete redesign proposal in Figma and the current development project board for Forums in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/

The forums on non-English sites (Rosetta sites) will not change as part of this update. Polyglots mentors can contact the #meta SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel to switch to the new theme. Some translation work will need to be done and that can be managed in the Forums project. The goal is to have all Rosetta sites switched over by July 1, 2024.

If you find an issue or have suggestions for larger functional changes, please add an item to the WordPress.org issues queue on GitHub or in Meta Trac

Finally, make sure to join the #website-redesign Slack channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. Thanks!

Props to @adamwood, @dufresnesteven, and @ryelle for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/support/
+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/polyglots/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/
+make.wordpress.org/accessibility/

#website-redesign

Homepage updates

If you visit WordPress.org, you will notice a few changes. This is not a complete reenvisioning of the homepage but rather a quick initial iteration that aims to accomplish a few things. 

  • Do a better job targeting new-to-WordPress users or those who are coming back to the platform after some time away.
  • Showcase modern WordPress, particularly the latest release, with a CTA to learn more.
  • Elevate the community section above the learning resources and add a link to the new Events page. 
  • Compact the design slightly.

Here’s the old design and the updated version side-by-side.

The old homepage design next to the new iteration.

The MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team has implemented several processes that make updating the homepage relatively easy. It’s entirely a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor page that then syncs back to template files stored in version control. 

The homepage should feel alive and dynamic. It should be updated consistently to showcase what’s new in WordPress, both in the CMS and the community. So what would you like to see? 

Next steps

Each section of the homepage can be viewed as a separate “module” that all work together to form the page. In this iteration, the following modules were updated: 

You can view the different versions of each module that were explored and continue to be explored in Figma. Add comments and share ideas there. You can also create issues directly in the wporg-main-2022 GithHub repository. This is the theme that powers the main WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ site. 

Finally, make sure to join the #website-redesign SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute.

Props to @ryelle and @joen for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

#website-redesign

Project Thread: Documentation Redesign

In early 2023, the Documentation site, also known as HelpHub, underwent a redesign and transitioned to a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. theme. You can learn more about this project in the original kick-off and launch posts.

The refresh of HelpHub set the stage for a redesign of Developer Resources (DevHub) last year, both part of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/’s Learn section. Ideally, both documentation sites should look and function similarly.

During the course of the DevHub update, design improvements were made, particularly to the homepage, and the block theme structure was refined. The new DevHub design was launched in December, so it’s now time for another iteration of HelpHub to ensure both sites are consistent.

Objective

Update HelpHub with the latest functionality and aesthetic introduced in the DevHub redesign. Add additional functionality to assist with content and user feedback management.

Overview

Given that the site is already a block theme, most of it won’t require changes. The redesign will concentrate on these specific areas:

  • Refreshing the homepage layout to be consistent with the DevHub redesign
  • Updating the block child themeChild theme A Child Theme is a customized theme based upon a Parent Theme. It’s considered best practice to create a child theme if you want to modify the CSS of your theme. https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/advanced-topics/child-themes/. with enhancements from the DevHub redesign
  • Standardizing typography, especially the heading fonts, to align with other Learn WordPress.org sections (#490)
  • Enhancing the process for receiving and managing feedback
  • Refining how updates to documentation articles are tracked (improving the changelog)

This update aims to be completed within a few weeks. During the redesign process, we’ll assess any new issues that arise. Depending on their nature and urgency, they’ll either be addressed in this iteration or placed on the backlog for future iterations. 

Project updates will be provided here throughout the process, and any important resources will be added to the post for easy reference. Redesign feedback can be left in Figma, on GitHub, or here in the comments. Please continue to log any content-related issues in the Documentation Issue Tracker.

Timeline

Start: February 19th
End: March 26th

Resources

Project Members

Docs: @estelaris
Design: @fcoveram
Development (MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.): @ryelle
Cross-team coordination: @ndiego

Props to @estelaris, @fcoveram, and @ryelle for their help in shaping this project and reviewing this post. 

+make.wordpress.org/docs/
+make.wordpress.org/design/

#project-thread, #website-redesign

Developer Resources gets a refresh

After many months of hard work, the redesign for the Developer Resources section of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ was launched yesterday. The goal was to provide an aesthetic refresh, update the site to a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. theme, and provide a consistent layout throughout the site. Congratulations to everyone who was involved in this effort.

You can view the announcement post for a more detailed overview of this project. All development took place in the wporg-developer GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repository, and the design was done in Figma.

Here’s a look at the new homepage followed by a sample page from the Block Editor Handbook.

The redesigned homepage versus the previous site.
A redesigned single page layout versus the previous site.

Design is content

This redesign focused on updating the theme structure, fonts, spacing, colors, etc. It did not touch any content in the various handbooks that comprise Developer Resources. Yet, the content is why we all visit this section of WordPress.org. 

Therefore, now that Developer Resources is updated, this is the perfect time to audit and improve the content throughout. Updating documentation, especially quick fixes like formatting and grammar, is one of the best ways new (or returning) contributors can help support the WordPress project. 

If you are interested in contributing to documentation, please check out the resources below. 

As with all changes to WordPress.org, this redesign is just a single iteration, with many more to come in the future. So, if you find an issue or have suggestions for larger functional changes, feel free to open an issue on GitHub. You will also see several issues already on deck for the next iteration

Finally, make sure to join the #website-redesign SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. Thanks!

Props to @greenshady for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/docs/
+make.wordpress.org/themes/
+make.wordpress.org/plugins/
+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/
+make.wordpress.org/accessibility/

#website-redesign #developer-hub

Redesigning Developer Resources and a call for testing

Over the past few months, contributors have been working on a new design for the Developer Resources section of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/, which includes the official Code Reference, BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor Handbook, Theme Handbook, and much more. 

This project aims to refresh the aesthetics of the Developer Resources section, convert the site to a block theme, and improve the overall developer experience. While this redesign includes few functional changes and virtually no content changes, the size of the site makes this project one of the largest we have tackled so far. 

All development work is taking place in the wporg-developer GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repository, and you can view the staging site here: developer.wordpress.org/redesign-test

Design

The Developer Resources redesign follows the new WordPress.org aesthetic that debuted with the Showcase redesign last month. Given that this is developer documentation, the design takes a slightly more minimalistic and content-first approach. You can view the comprehensive design, as well as all previous iterations, in Figma.

Below is the redesigned homepage.

The redesigned homepage versus the current site.

The internal page design takes inspiration from other popular documentation sites, such as React and MDN Web Docs. Visitors are presented with the familiar layout of a chapter list on the left, content in the middle, and a table of contents on the right.

Here’s a sample page from the Block Editor Handbook.

A redesigned single page layout versus the current site.

Development

While the new design is the most apparent change, Developer Resources will soon be powered by blocks. Specifically, it’s a custom child theme that sits atop the WordPress.org parent block theme. Much like the newly redesigned Showcase site, this structure allows us to take advantage of CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. functionality like Group and Query blocks as well as custom blocks explicitly built for WordPress.org.

As we continue to migrate sections of the WordPress.org network to block themes, each subsequent project will become easier and build off prior work. For example, we completed the standardization of layout and spacing variables as part of the Showcase redesign last month. 

Content

The content and existing content management processes for all internal sections of Developer Resources will not change as part of the redesign work. The one minor exception is the homepage, as can be seen in the screenshot above.

The content for the new homepage was based on the existing site but now uses a “card” layout. This new design is highly adaptable, and additional cards can be added easily. The one new addition is a listing of the latest Developer Blog posts. 

The Developer Blog posts list on the homepage

In the last year, the Blog has become a valuable community-driven resource for content that complements the official developer documentation. Surfacing the latest posts on the homepage will increase its visibility.

The Developer Blog is also being redesigned to match the new look of Developer Resources. The goal is for developers to navigate fluidly between blog articles and official developer documentation without feeling like they are visiting two completely different sites. 

How you can help

First, thank you to everyone who has contributed so far to this new Developer Resources redesign, whether in Figma, GitHub, or the #website-redesign channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. However, we need additional help. 

Given the scope of this section, more testing is needed as we look toward launching the new design in early December. While functionality might have moved around, there should be parity between the current site and the staging site. 

Here are the major sections of Developer Relations. Each link will take you to the relevant section in the staging site.

If you would like to propose a change or report an issue, please do so in the wporg-developer GitHub repository. Please ensure your issue has not already been reported before opening a new one. The goal is to wrap up all testing and quality assurance by the end of next week (12/1). 

As with all changes to WordPress.org, this redesign is just a single iteration, with many more to come in the future. So, if you have suggestions for larger functional changes, feel free to propose those as well. 

Also, make sure to join the #website-redesign Slack channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. Thanks!

Props to @laurlittle, @markoserb, and @adamwood for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/docs/
+make.wordpress.org/themes/
+make.wordpress.org/plugins/
+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/

#website-redesign #developer-hub

Revitalizing the WordPress Showcase

On Wednesday, October 18th, we will update the WordPress Showcase as part of the ongoing visual refresh of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/

We began this project last year and have continually iterated on the initial design throughout 2023. In the past few months, a team of contributors has worked hard across Figma, GitHub, and the new #website-redesign SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel to get Showcase v2 ready for launch.

While still being actively worked on, you can view the staging site here: wordpress.org/showcase-v2


The Showcase should be a natural starting point when a visitor arrives on WordPress.org and wants to explore what WordPress can do. It should inspire and demonstrate what’s possible, from personal blogs and portfolios to online businesses and enterprise-level sites. The Showcase should be instrumental in answering the question, “Why WordPress?”

Achieving this goal begins with an update to the design and structure of the site as well as the return of Showcase as a top-level navigation link (handled separately). 

These are just the first steps. Feedback and ideas for future iterations are encouraged. Please comment below or raise an issue on GitHub

Design

The new Showcase design follows the general mold of the current Showcase while overhauling the aesthetics and improving the user experience. It emphasizes bold visuals and a more dynamic browsing experience through tags and categories. Individual site pages now include desktop and mobile screenshots, while the site introduces an improved layout on mobile devices. 

A diversity of websites is presented in this initial redesign, from Fortune 500 companies and celebrity fan sites to small boutique businesses and artist portfolios.


This design also paves the way for future iterations. Some ideas include spotlighting popular use cases and introducing more engaging content like “site of the month.” The possibilities are endless. What would you like to see?

Development

While the new design is the most apparent change, Showcase is now powered by blocks. Specifically, it’s a custom child theme that sits atop the WordPress.org parent block theme. This structure allows the site to take advantage of CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. functionality like Group and Query blocks as well as custom blocks explicitly built for WordPress.org. 

The Showcase also introduces new blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.-based functionality and several components that will be used elsewhere on the WordPress.org network. Improvements, such as the standardization of layout and spacing variables (#105) and the new Query FilterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. block (#441), will make it easier to update other areas of WordPress.org to blocks.

Content

This iteration of Showcase has primarily focused on design and development. That said, some content work was done to ensure all sites in the Showcase are up to date. 

For launch, 101 sites have been added to the site, many of which were brought over from the current Showcase, or had been submitted but were never actually added. This number will grow with new submissions.

Earlier this year, two Make posts were published regarding the content moderation and submission guidelines for Showcase. You can review both here:

Moderating submissions and maintaining the Showcase takes a significant amount of contribution hours. As a result, there have been times in the past when the Showcase was left somewhat neglected. 

Looking ahead, we need to streamline the submission process as much as possible. Submissions will likely always require manual review, but the rest of the process should be automated where possible. As an example, automated email notifications are currently being explored (#223). This work will take time, but should not impede the launch of Showcase v2.


Thank you to everyone who contributed to this revitalization of the WordPress Showcase, whether in Figma, GitHub, or in the #website-redesign channel in Slack. As with all changes to WordPress.org, this is just a single iteration with many more to come in the future.

If you would like to propose a change or report an issue, please do so in the wporg-showcase-2022  GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repository. Also, make sure to join the #website-redesign Slack channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute.

Props to @eidolonnight, @cbringmann, @annezazu, and @laurlittle for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

+make.wordpress.org/design/
+make.wordpress.org/marketing/

#design, #showcase, #website-redesign

Updates to global header and footer navigation

The global headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes. and footer navigation will be updated on Wednesday, October 18th, to continually improve the user experience on WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ as discussed in #360 Navigation: Rephrase a few items, reconsider sorting, and #364 Footer: Revisit footer links and categorize.

Global header navigation

In September 2022, the global navigation menuNavigation Menu A theme feature introduced with Version 3.0. WordPress includes an easy to use mechanism for giving various control options to get users to click from one place to another on a site. was updated to better organize content across the WordPress.org network. This iteration notably grouped several previously top-level menu items into sub-menus. 

Since then, there has been a discussion (see #360) about how the navigation could be further improved with a greater focus on visitors exploring WordPress for the first time. Overall, the changes are relatively minimal, but this iteration notably adds Showcase and Hosting back as top-level menu items and simplifies the Download & Extend grouping.

A live demonstration of the upcoming changes.

Content changes

  • Showcase is back as a top-level menu item.
    • The goal is to make the Showcase more visible and to provide visitors, especially new-to-WordPress visitors, a way to see what can be built with WordPress. 
    • This update is related to the pending Showcase v2 launch.
  • Hosting is back as a top-level menu item.
    • The goal is to provide new-to-WordPress visitors with a better path to getting started with WordPress since some form of hosting is always required.
    • While outside the scope of these navigation updates, some exploratory work is being done in Figma to improve the aesthetics of the Hosting page and explain why hosting is required for WordPress. This would make the page feel more educational and help new-to-WordPress visitors get oriented.
  • Download & Extend is renamed to just Extend.
    • The goal is to simplify this section and “decouple” menu items that focus on “extending” WordPress and those related to “getting” WordPress.
    • “Downloading” a .zip is also not the primary way users get WordPress these days, so directing folks to the Get WordPress button makes more sense, especially for new-to-WordPress visitors.
  • The Get WordPress and Mobile links under Extend are removed.
    • Visitors are now directed to the Get WordPress button to “get” WordPress. The mobile app CTA is already present on this page.
  • The new Blocks page is added under Extend.
    • The current page is v1, and v2 is planned (#318). This page aims to tell the story of blocks in WordPress. It was placed under Extend since making custom blocks and working with the BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor are key ways of “extending” what WordPress can do.
  • In Extend, the Plugins link has been moved above Patterns to reflect its higher importance.
  • The WordPress Swag Store has been renamed to Swag Store.

Functional changes

  • Make sub-menus open on-click instead of on-hover to reduce the number of actual links in the navigation and subtly improve accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) (#440
  • Prevent screenreaders from reading the external link arrows (↗) to improve accessibility (#453)

Global footer navigation

The update to the global footer navigation is minimal. There has been a lot of great discussion about a more extensive overhaul (see #364), which future iterations should consider. 

The most significant change is to denote all external links with an arrow (↗) to match the implementation in the global header navigation.

Content changes

  • All external links are denoted with an arrow (↗)
  • Links are now loosely ordered by:
    • About
    • Showcase/Extend
    • Ways to learn WordPress
    • Ways to get involved/support WordPress
    • Other important external links
  • The Public Code link is removed to ensure an equal number of links in each column. 
  • Swag is renamed to Swag Store to match the global header navigation.
  • The capitalization of WordPress.TV is fixed to match the global header navigation.

Thank you to everyone who participated in crafting these changes, both in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ and in the #website-redesign channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. As with all changes to WordPress.org, this is just a single iteration, with many more to come. The website is constantly evolving.

If you would like to propose a change or report an issue, please do so in the wporg-mu-plugins GitHub repository, which handles all navigation (among other things) across the WordPress.org network. Also, join the #website-redesign Slack channel if you are interested in additional updates coming to WordPress.org and want to contribute. 

Props to @eidolonnight, @cbringmann, and @laurlittle for reviewing this post and providing feedback.

#navigation, #website-redesign