New cache Site Health checks in WordPress 6.1

As part of the WordPress 6.1 release, the Performance Team has added two Site Health checks (Persistent Object Cache and Page Cache). These checks were previously tested in the Performance Lab plugin. You can read more about them in the original proposal.

Both checks will run only in a production environment.

Persistent Object Cache

This new check determines whether the site uses a persistent object cache or not and recommends it if it makes sense for the site. It also links to a support resource created for the check.

A few filters have been included aiming for hosting providers to provide more specific steps regarding their environment.

Hosts may use the site_status_persistent_object_cache_url filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to replace the original WordPress guide with their own guide.

/**
 * Filter the Persistent object cache URL.
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_persistent_object_cache_url', function() {
	return 'https://awesomewphosting.com/optimization/persistent-object-cache';
} );

Hosts may use the site_status_persistent_object_cache_notes filter to customize the notes to recommend their preferred object cache solution.

/**
 * Update the persistent object cache notes.
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_persistent_object_cache_notes', function( $notes ) {
	$notes = __( 'The updated notes can go here as text.', 'text-domain' );

	return $notes;
} );

The site_status_persistent_object_cache_thresholds filter allows modifying the thresholds above WordPress considers using a persistent object cache beneficial.

/**
 * Override the whole $thresholds array, or any specific indexes as required.
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_persistent_object_cache_thresholds', function( $thresholds ) {
	$thresholds = array(
		'alloptions_count' => 600,
		'alloptions_bytes' => 200000,
		'comments_count'   => 2000,
		'options_count'    => 2000,
		'posts_count'      => 2000,
		'terms_count'      => 2000,
		'users_count'      => 2000,
	);

	return $thresholds;
} );

Alternatively, site_status_should_suggest_persistent_object_cache is a short-circuit filter that allows using entirely custom logic to determine whether a persistent object cache would make sense for the site.

/**
 * Opt in for suggesting the persistent object cache
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_should_suggest_persistent_object_cache', '__return_true' );

For additional context on this new check, see #56040.

Full Page Cache

This new check determines whether the site is using a full page cache solution and if the response time is acceptable.

It also adds a couple of filters aiming for hosting companies to customize the response threshold and add their own cache headers to be detected.

The site_status_good_response_time_threshold filter allows modifying the current threshold of 600ms. Everything below this will be considered acceptable.

/**
 * Filter the response time threshold
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_good_response_time_threshold', function() {
	return 200;
} );

Additional custom cache headers ( and optionally their verification callbacks) can be added through the site_status_page_cache_supported_cache_headers filter.

/**
 * Filter the page cache supported cache headers
 * $cache_headers contains List of client caching headers and their (optional) verification callbacks.
 */
add_filter( 'site_status_page_cache_supported_cache_headers', function( $cache_headers  ) {
	// Add new header to the existing list.
	$cache_headers['cf-cache-status'] = static function ( $header_value ) {
		return false !== strpos( strtolower( $header_value ), 'hit' );
	};
	return $cache_headers;
});

For additional context on this new check, see #56041.

Thanks to @flixos90, @milana_cap, @spacedmonkey for peer review, and @pushpakpop for the code examples.

#6-1, #core-site-health, #dev-notes, #dev-notes-6-1, #performance, #performance-lab, #site-health

Proposal: Persistent Object Cache and Full Page Cache Site Health Checks

This proposal seeks to integrate two new Site Health checks for Persistent Object Cache and Full Page Cache into WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., targeting the WordPress 6.1 release.

Context

Providing valuable recommendations for site owners is crucial to improving WordPress performance. These two modules are the first in a series of Site Health modules that the performance team is working on. Acknowledging performance problems is the first step to solving them.

The modules were originally proposed and developed by members of the performance team and are available as modules inside the Performance Lab plugin.

Project update

Development of the features has been ongoing in the Performance Lab plugin repository on GitHub, where they have been implemented as: 

The recently released version 1.2.0 of the Performance Lab plugin contains both modules in a state that is ready to merge into core. 

The team is currently migrating the module code into WordPress core patches in 2 TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. tickets:

  • Persistent Object Cache Health Check from performance pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to core (#56040)
  • Port Audit Full Page Cache from performance plugin to core (#56041)

Any reviews and feedback on the core patches would be greatly appreciated.

Customizing the audits

We’ve added a series of filters to make messaging and suggestions customizable. These filters can be used by hosting providers to provide their own personalized suggestions on how to address the Site Health feedback.

Persistent Object Cache filters

Hosts may want to replace the notes to recommend their preferred object caching solution:

apply_filters( 'site_status_persistent_object_cache_notes', $notes, $available_services );

Hosts may want to replace the original link to WordPress documentation with a link to  their own guide:

apply_filters( 'site_status_persistent_object_cache_url',  __('https://wordpress.org/support/article/optimization/#object-caching' ));

Hosts or site owners may want to bypass thresholds and force suggestions, or filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. them to determine whether to suggest the use of a persistent object cache:

apply_filters( 'site_status_suggest_persistent_object_cache', false );
apply_filters(
    'site_status_persistent_object_cache_thresholds',
    array(
        'alloptions_count' => 500,
        'alloptions_bytes' => 100000,
        'comments_count'   => 1000,
        'options_count'    => 1000,
        'posts_count'      => 1000,
        'terms_count'      => 1000,
        'users_count'      => 1000,
    )
);

Full Page Cache filters

Developers can filter the threshold below which a response time is considered good:

apply_filters( 'page_cache_good_response_time_threshold', 600 );

Testing and feedback

You can test the modules in v1.2.0 or later of the Performance Lab plugin. Both modules should be enabled by default, but you can double-check that they are enabled in Settings > Performance:

Once enabled, you can view the test results on the Site Health Status screen at Tools > Site Health > Status.

We encourage you to test these modules (and others) from the Performance Lab Plugin, report any bugs in our GitHub repository, or contribute with fixes and ideas. You can also share any feedback, concerns, or questions to improve these features further in the comments.

Thanks to @mxbclang and @flixos90 for peer review.

#6-1, #core-site-health, #performance, #performance-lab, #site-health

Version 1.0.0 of the Performance Lab plugin published

The first stable version 1.0.0 of the Performance Lab pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party has been released. You can download it from the WordPress plugin repository or via GitHub.

The stable release means that the Performance Lab plugin’s infrastructure is now out of betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. testing stage. The plugin’s primary purpose remains to facilitate beta testing for future WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. performance features and enhancements, as outlined in the original plugin announcement post. The initial beta phase for the plugin was primarily to allow the performance team to discover early infrastructure bugs and fix them before the stable launch.

Included modules

The following modules are included in the 1.0.0 release:

  • WebP Uploads: Creates WebP versions for new JPEG image uploads if supported by the server. View related GitHub issues
  • WebP Support: Adds a WebP support check in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues
  • Persistent Object Cache Health Check: Adds a persistent object cache check for sites with non-trivial amounts of data in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues
  • Audit Autoloaded Options (experimental): Adds a check for autoloaded options in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues
  • Audit Enqueued Assets (experimental): Adds a CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. and JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. resource check in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues

Next steps

The performance team is going to continue enhancing the existing modules and evaluating additional modules to add in the future. The cadence and versioning strategy for upcoming releases is currently up for discussion. Please provide your feedback on plugin versioning in this issue if you are interested. There is an ongoing vote in that issue which is open until 2022-05-02 17:00 UTC.


Kudos to all the people that have contributed to and tested the Performance Lab plugin so far and made this first stable release possible! Let’s keep testing and iterating on the individual features to bring each of them closer to an eventual WordPress core merge.

Props to @mxbclang @adamsilverstein @jeffpaul for review and proofreading.

#feature-plugins, #feature-projects, #performance, #performance-lab

The Performance Lab plugin has been released

Introducing the Performance Lab pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party: After the WordPress performance team began work on it in November 2021, the first version of the plugin is finally here and ready for testing. You can download it or install it directly from your WordPress dashboard. Your testing and feedback will allow iterating towards adding future performance optimizations in WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress..

What is the Performance Lab plugin?

The Performance Lab plugin is a set of modules that aim to improve performance in WordPress. While this may sound similar to the numerous other performance plugins in the WordPress ecosystem, the Performance Lab plugin exists for an entirely different purpose: It is a collection of performance-related “feature projects” for WordPress core.

Feature projects are intended to gather a group of people to explore potential ideas for WordPress core.

Feature Projects Overview

Historically, feature projects have usually been implemented as separate feature plugins. The Performance Lab plugin provides a centralized location for performance-related features which are intended to eventually be merged into WordPress core. Therefore, it should be considered a betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process.-testing plugin. The plugin’s performance modules can be individually enabled in the plugin’s settings screen, so that they can be tested in isolation or in combination. Being able to activate/deactivate modules is similar to activating individual plugins, but the Performance Lab approach comes with benefits: For both developers and end users, it removes the burden of keeping track of several plugins. For developers, it additionally reduces maintenance and encourages collaboration between developers.

Settings > Performance screen of the plugin with a list of modules that can be individually toggled on and off
The Performance Lab plugin’s settings screen

Another benefit of the single plugin approach taken with the Performance Lab plugin is that it provides room for experimentation. Some modules included in the plugin are explicitly marked as experimental, and while the entire plugin is for testing WordPress performance features, those modules are at a particularly early stage of exploration and therefore could lead to unexpected results This also leads to the clarification that all performance modules bundled in the Performance Lab plugin are at different stages of development. For example, some may already be official WordPress core feature projects, others may be proposed as feature projects in the near future. Some experimental modules may remain in exploration for a few months to come.

Because the Performance Lab plugin is a collection of potential WordPress core feature modules, the list of modules included may drastically change over time. New modules may be added regularly, while other modules may be removed in a future plugin version once they have landed in a WordPress core release. Also keep in mind that the Performance Lab plugin is not a full replacement for other WordPress performance plugins you may be using already.

Who develops the Performance Lab plugin?

The Performance Lab plugin is being actively worked on by the WordPress performance team, which was formed in late October 2021. The plugin is the primary project of the team where new performance features are being explored and implemented. It complements the direct contributions to WordPress core, which happen for smaller fixes or for features that already have seen significant testing in the plugin.

The modules included in the plugin are based on the priorities of the performance team contributors who meet weekly in the #performance Slack channel to discuss the ongoing efforts and priorities. The performance team takes into account the impact of different features while prioritizing work, and the modules included are also influenced by contributor interest. So far, over 250 people have joined the performance SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel, with many of them participating in the weekly chats and reporting issues on GitHub. While code contributions to the plugin so far have been limited to just slightly more than 10 contributors, the performance team is confident that the volume of code contributions will increase over time, especially as the plugin starts seeing increased usage.

Which features come with this initial Performance Lab plugin version?

This initial release of the Performance Lab plugin (1.0.0-beta.1) comes with the following modules:

  • WebP Uploads: Creates WebP versions for new JPEG image uploads if supported by the server. View related GitHub issues
  • WebP Support: Adds a WebP support check in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues
  • Persistent Object Cache Health Check: Adds a persistent object cache check for sites with non-trivial amounts of data in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues
  • Audit Enqueued Assets (experimental): Adds a CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. and JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. resource check in Site Health status. View related GitHub issues

To test the WebP Uploads module, upload some JPEG images to the Media Library, and the module should ensure that the sub-sized versions are also generated in WebP and then used in the front-end when embedding such uploaded images in a post.

To test the other three modules, visit the Site Health status tab, where each module adds a corresponding new check:

  • The Audit Enqueued Assets module monitors the amount of scripts and stylesheets enqueued on your homepage.
  • The WebP support module checks whether your server environment supports creating WebP images.
  • The Persistent Object Cache Health Check promotes usage of an external object cache depending on the amount of data on your site.

Remember that each module you would like to test has to be activated via the plugin’s settings screen at Settings > Performance. Non-experimental modules are enabled by default. If you want to test the modules individually in isolation, you can toggle them one by one.

To learn more about the modules, you can use the GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ labels to follow along their development via the links from the list above. You can also review the full release changelog.

How can I support the Performance Lab plugin?

Since the Performance Lab plugin is a beta testing plugin, the most straightforward way of contributing is to use it! Test the individual modules, try to break them, explore edge-cases etc. Any feedback or bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. reports are welcome as GitHub issues or alternatively as wordpress.org support forum requests. If you have found a bug and already discovered a fix for it, you can submit a  pull request. You’re also invited to share your feedback in a review. Last but not least, share the news! Only with a solid number of regular testers can the features in this plugin mature over time.

If you would like to participate in developing or shaping the direction of the plugin, the performance team would be pleased to have you join the weekly chats in the #performance Slack channel! The next one will take place at March 8, 2022, at 16:00 UTC.

Another area to contribute to the plugin is localization. If you speak a language other than English, help make the Performance Lab plugin available in your localeLocale A locale is a combination of language and regional dialect. Usually locales correspond to countries, as is the case with Portuguese (Portugal) and Portuguese (Brazil). Other examples of locales include Canadian English and U.S. English. by contributing translations.


Many thanks to all the community volunteers that have contributed to the Performance Lab plugin and the overall efforts of the performance team so far! This beta release is a major milestone and just the beginning – let’s continue from here.

Props to @addyosmani @jonoaldersonwp @tweetythierry @mxbclang @adamsilverstein @clarkeemily @mitogh @dainemawer @justinahinon for review and proofreading.

#feature-plugins, #feature-projects, #performance, #performance-lab