WordPress 6.5 adds AVIF support 

WordPress 6.5 supports AVIF, a modern image format that offers significant improvements in image quality and compression over previous formats like JPEG, PNG, and even WebP.  AVIF images can be up to 50% smaller than JPEGs while maintaining the same image quality. AVIF images also support a wide range of colors (including HDR) and produce sharper images than JPEGs, especially in areas with high detail.

From WordPress version 6.5 forward, you can upload and use AVIF images in WordPress just like you would a JPEG or PNG image today – as long as your hosting environment supports AVIF. Switching to the AVIF format for your images is likely to improve your site’s performance and your site visitor’s experience. 

How AVIF helps you

AVIF images are significantly smaller than their JPEG equivalents, so pages load more quickly and take less bandwidth to transmit. AVIF images still get all of the benefits of the responsive images, Fetch Priority, and lazy loading that WordPress supports by default. Finally, AVIFs are supported in all major browsers, so most sites can start using them today.

Creating AVIF images

Many image editing tools support exporting to AVIF. You can also use command line conversion tools or web based open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. tools like Squoosh. Once you save your images as AVIF, upload them to WordPress and use them like you would any other image. WordPress can also create AVIFs for you automatically, for more details, see the FAQ item below.

Using AVIF images in WordPress

AVIF images work like any other image format in WordPress, with a few important notes:

AVIF in WordPress depends on support in your web server’s image processing library (WordPress has built-in support for both Imagick and LibGD for image processing). You can check for AVIF support in wp-adminadmin (and super admin) by visiting Tools -> Site Health, clicking the “Info” tab and expanding the “Media Handling” section, then finally looking for “AVIF” in the list of supported formats.

If your audience includes a significant number of users on an unsupported browser, either avoid using AVIF images, or enqueue a browser polyfill.

FAQ

Q: How do I adjust the compression level used for generated AVIF images?

The wp_editor_set_quality filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. can be used to set the quality setting. The passed mime type enables setting by type, for example:

// Use a quality setting of 75 for AVIF images.
function filter_avif_quality( $quality, $mime_type ) {
if ( 'image/avif' === $mime_type ) {
return 75;
}
return $quality;
}
add_filter( 'wp_editor_set_quality', 'filter_avif_quality', 10, 2 );

How can I output lossless AVIF images?

Using a compression level of 100 will set AVIF to its lossless mode.

Q: Can WordPress create AVIF images when I upload JPEGs?

Yes. Developers can use the image_editor_output_format filter to specify this type of transformation for uploads. Here is an example:

// Output AVIFs for uploaded JPEGs
function filter_image_editor_output_format( $formats ) {
$formats['image/jpeg'] = 'image/avif';
return $formats;
}
add_filter( 'image_editor_output_format', 'filter_image_editor_output_format' );

If I use WordPress multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site, will all my sites work with AVIF images?

No. Multisite stores the file types that users are allowed to upload when a site is created. We are still working on improving this in #53167. In the meantime, to ensure all existing sites on a networknetwork (versus site, blog) allow AVIF files, you can use the site_option filter in a network mu-pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to add avif to the allowed file types for all network sites:

// Ensure all network sites include AVIF support.
function filter_site_option_upload_filetypes( $filetypes ) {
$filetypes = explode( ' ', $filetypes );
if ( ! in_array( 'avif', $filetypes, true ) ) {
$filetypes[] = 'avif';
}
return implode( ' ', $filetypes );
}
add_filter( 'site_option_upload_filetypes', 'filter_site_option_upload_filetypes' );


Thanks to @stevenlinx and @westonruter for reviewing this post.

#6-5, #core-images, #dev-notes, #dev-notes-6-5, #images

Proposal for enhancing LCP image performance with the fetchpriority attribute in WordPress core

This post proposes adding the fetchpriority=”high” attribute to LCP images in WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. to enhance LCP performance. The proposal was created as a collaboration between members of the Core Performance Team.

Context

The fetchpriority attribute is a standard HTML attribute that can be used to indicate to the browser that a given resource should have a particular priority for when it should be considered for loading. Most commonly, using the attribute is recommended with a value of “high”, only on the most important image on a page.

It is a performance best practice to provide fetchpriority=”high” on the single image that is the “Largest Contentful Paint element” in the HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. markup, to indicate to the browser that this image should be prioritized over other resources that would compete with it for networknetwork (versus site, blog) bandwidth.

Largest Contentful Paint (LCP) is one of the three Core Web Vitals metrics, and it represents how quickly the main content of a web page is loaded. Specifically, LCP measures the time from when the user initiates loading the page until the largest image or text blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. is rendered within the viewport.

Quoted from this article about optimizing LCP

As mentioned above, the Largest Contentful Paint element can take different forms, it may be an image, text, video, or other resource. However, most commonly the LCP element on WordPress sites is an image, concretely 42.4% on desktop and 38.2% on mobile based on HTTP Archive data from February 2023. Of those sites, less than 0.03% have fetchpriority=”high” on their LCP image, so it is safe to say that introducing support in WordPress core will benefit almost all of them.

You can learn more about the fetchpriority attribute and how it should be used to optimize image performance in this article.

Proposed solution

WordPress core already comes with a mechanism to detect which image(s) not to lazy-load because they are likely in the viewport, which includes the potential LCP image. Bringing fetchpriority=”high” to images in WordPress core should make use of that existing logic for the loading attribute, which was added in WordPress 5.9. However, the two attributes should still function independently of each other. Furthermore, a few additional aspects need to be taken into consideration and implemented as additional heuristics that only apply to the fetchpriority attribute, but not the loading attribute.

Initially, the two attributes may seem like they are opposites. An image that should be lazy-loaded should not have a high priority, and vice-versa. The usage of fetchpriority=”high” however needs to be a bit more nuanced: It should only be loaded on the single most important image on the page. This is different from loading=”lazy” which should be omitted on any image above the fold — which sometimes may be just the LCP image, while in other cases it may be multiple images.

In other words, fetchpriority=”high” should only ever appear on a single image at most.

Scope

While the fetchpriority attribute is available on a few different HTML elements, the scope of this proposal is only to use the attribute on images, specifically to add it to the likely LCP image of a page so that the browser knows to load it earlier than other resources that may be competing with it.

Performance impact

Based on benchmarks conducted by members of the Core Performance Team, adding fetchpriority=”high” to the LCP image typically improves LCP performance by 5-10%, which is a notable win for adding a simple attribute to an image tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.). In some instances the enhancements can even be close to 30%, like in an example from the aforementioned article.

Browser compatibility

While the fetchpriority attribute is a relatively new attribute first introduced in 2022, it was standardized in February 2023 and is supported by all Chromium based browsers, which make up for ~70% of browser usage based on caniuse.com. Support was recently added in WebKit, and is currently available in the Safari 167 Tech Preview. Firefox has expressed positive feedback on the feature, and a ticket to support it is available. Despite not every major browser supporting the attribute, it is a progressive enhancementenhancement Enhancements are simple improvements to WordPress, such as the addition of a hook, a new feature, or an improvement to an existing feature., i.e. fully backward compatible: A browser that does not understand the attribute will ignore it, and its presence won’t cause any adverse effects.

Effectively, this enhancement is only about adding the fetchpriority=”high” attribute to the LCP image, which does not pose any risk of breaking backward compatibility.

Default behavior and customization

Similar to how WordPress core handles omitting the loading attribute on specific images, it should add the fetchpriority attribute by default on the LCP image based on server-side heuristics. While the exact heuristics are still being defined, it should be noted that the two attributes will never be used on the same image as they should be mutually exclusive.

Developers will be able to customize where the attribute should be used, e.g. when using the functions wp_get_attachment_image() and get_the_post_thumbnail(), both of which should receive support for the attribute. The default addition of the attribute to in-content images will also be customizable using a new filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output., which will likely be similar to existing image attribute filters like wp_img_tag_add_loading_attr or wp_img_tag_add_width_and_height_attr.

Alternatives considered

Alternatively to fetchpriority=”high”, images can also be prioritized through other means, e.g. a link[rel=”preload”] tag in the head, or a Link response headerHeader The header of your site is typically the first thing people will experience. The masthead or header art located across the top of your page is part of the look and feel of your website. It can influence a visitor’s opinion about your content and you/ your organization’s brand. It may also look different on different screen sizes.. While those two approaches in principle allow the browser to know about loading the image even earlier, in practice there isn’t a notable difference, especially when using the tag, as at that point the entire HTML will already be loaded.

Either of the alternative approaches would furthermore require WordPress core knowing about the image in the page load lifecycle before it is even included in the output, which makes them more complex to implement in a way that is not justifiable given the little benefits it would bring over using fetchpriority=”high” on the actual image tag.

Contributing and testing this enhancement

An early version of the proposed enhancement can already be tested through the Performance Lab plugin, by enabling its Fetchpriority module, or alternatively through the Fetchpriority standalone plugin which uses the same underlying logic. It should be noted that the implementation is still being refined with additional heuristics to detect the LCP image, and since it is part of a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party rather than within WordPress core, the customization options outlined above cannot be part of this early implementation. It should furthermore be noted that the plugin implementation relies heavily on WordPress core’s lazy-loading heuristics, whereas the plan for the eventual core implementation would be to decouple the two.

A WordPress Core TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #58235 has been opened, and a pull request for WordPress core, including the aforementioned customization options will be worked on soon.
Your testing and feedback is much appreciated. Please share your ideas, questions and thoughts either in a comment on this post, in the plugin’s support forum on wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/, or on the GitHub repository.

Props to @tweetythierry @adamsilverstein @addyosmani @joemcgill @thekt12 for review and proofreading.

#fetchpriority, #images, #media, #performance, #performance-lab

WordPress 5.8 adds WebP support

WebP is a modern image format that provides improved lossless and lossy compression for images on the web. WebP images are around 30% smaller on average than their JPEG or PNG equivalents, resulting in sites that are faster and use less bandwidth. WebP is supported in all modern browsers according to caniuse.

From WordPress version 5.8 forward, you can upload and use WebP images in WordPress like you would a JPEG or PNG image today (as long as your hosting service supports WebP). Switching to the WebP format for your images will improve your site’s performance and your site visitor’s experience. 

How WebP Helps You

WebP images are significantly smaller than their JPEG equivalents, so visitors to your site will see the complete page loaded more quickly. Smaller images take less bandwidth to transmit, and your images still get all of the responsive benefits of srcset and lazy loading by default. Finally, WebP is supported in all major browsers, so most sites can start using them today.

Creating WebP images

Image editing tools support exporting in WebP, or you can also use command line conversion tools or web based tools like Squoosh. Once you save your images as WebP, upload them to WordPress and use them like you would any other image. 

Using WebP images

WebP images work like any other image in WordPress with some small caveats. 

WebP images support lossy and lossless compression, as well as an animated format and support for transparent images. In WordPress, the lossless WebP format is only supported when the hosting server uses Imagick (the PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher library) until LibGD adds support. In addition, animated and alpha formats are not yet supported for resized images (lossy images are created instead when you upload in these formats).

WebP support in the media library requires that your web server’s image processing library (WordPress supports both Imagick and LibGD) supports the WebP format. Fortunately these libraries have supported WebP for quite a while so support is widely available. If your web server does not support WebP, you will see an error message when you try to upload a WebP image.

If your audience includes a significant number of users on an unsupported browser (IE11 for example), either avoid using WebP images, or  enqueue a browser polyfill.

Plans for the future

The media component team is also exploring the option of having WordPress perform the image format conversion on uploaded images – using WebP as the default output format for sub-sized images. You can track progress and test this feature on the trac ticket. We are also keeping our eyes on even more modern formats like AVIF and JPEGXL that will both improve compression and further reduce resources required for compression.

FAQ

How can I fine tune the compression quality setting used for WebP images?

Developers or plugins can use the wp_editor_set_quality filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. to set the quality setting. The passed mime type enables setting by type, for example:

// Use a quality setting of 75 for WebP images.
function filter_webp_quality( $quality, $mime_type ) {
  if ( 'image/webp' === $mime_type ) {
     return 75;
  }
  return $quality;
}
add_filter( 'wp_editor_set_quality', 'filter_webp_quality', 10, 2 );

What happens if I enable the filter to use WebP sub-sizes, but upload JPEG? Do the sub-sizes have to match the original?

By default, WordPres creates the sub-sized images of the same type as the uploaded file, so uploaded WebP files to get WebP files on your site. If you want to experiment with uploading JPEG and having WordPress auto-convert these to WebP for your sub-sized images, check out this plugin (related trac ticket).

If I use WordPress multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site, will all my sites work with WebP images?

No. Multisite stores the file types that users are allowed to upload when a site is created. We are working on improving this in #53167. In the meantime, to ensure all existing sites on a networknetwork (versus site, blog) allow WebP files, you can use the site_option filter in a network mu-pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to add webp to the allowed file types for all network sites:

// Ensure all network sites include WebP support.
add_filter(
  'site_option_upload_filetypes',
  function ( $filetypes ) {
    $filetypes = explode( ' ', $filetypes );
    if ( ! in_array( 'webp', $filetypes, true ) ) {
      $filetypes[] = 'webp';
    }
    $filetypes   = implode( ' ', $filetypes );

    return $filetypes;
  }
);

#5-8, #core-images, #dev-notes, #images

Enhancing image preview: core proposal

For many years search engine results have shown various images size publicly made available by site owners. Last year (September 2019), some extra controls over the content preview was introduced to Google Search followed by Bing who announced similar capabilities for their Search Engine earlier this year (April 2020).

In practice, this means that many sites do not get the benefit of large image previews, and may be losing out on traffic. Today, WordPress sites do not opt-in to large image previews by default even when “Search Engine Visibility” setting is turned on.

Below is an example comparison of Discover content for small image preview vs large image preview:

Proposed Solution 

This proposal is to opt-in to large image previews by default when “Search Engine Visibility” setting is turned on allowing search engines to display large images resulting in an enhanced user experience and CTR (click-through rate).

Theoretically, this is as simple as conditionally injecting <meta name="robots" content="max-image-preview:large"> in the HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. head of all pages.

WordPress may already inject a “robots” metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.) into a page, for example when a site is set to disallow search engines from indexing it. To facilitate large image previews as well as exposing a central management layer for the “robots” meta tag, a new function wp_robots() should be introduced. The function would include a filterable list of values to include in the “robots” meta tag and render the meta tag only if necessary. Having this centralized layer will streamline robots management and interoperability between plugins.

By default, the list would cover the following values:

  • noindex, to be included when search engines are disallowed from indexing the page or due to certain other circumstances
  • nofollow, to be included when noindex is provided when search engines are disallowed from indexing the page
  • follow, to be included when noindex is provided due to certain other circumstances
  • max-image-preview: large, to be included when search engines are allowed to index the page, and when large preview images may be used for the page

This would only be the default behavior and could be expanded or modified by plugins, for example to add additional robots tag directives.

The function would be hooked into wp_head and other relevant actions, and it would essentially supersede the existing noindex() and wp_no_robots() functions.

What’s next?

Your thoughts on this proposal would be greatly valued. Please share your feedback, questions or interest in collaboration by commenting on this post. After that we can create a tracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. and kick start development.

#images, #proposal, #seo

Media Weekly Update (Oct 7)

This post serves to jump-start discussion before the weekly check in, which takes place in #core-images on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. The next meeting is Friday, October 14 at 17:00 UTC and agenda for these meetings includes moving priority tasks forward, providing feedback on issues of interest, and reviewing media focused tickets on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress..

Summary from last week

The last meeting was Friday, October 7 at 17:00 UTC. You can read the entire chat log in the #core-images channel on Slack.

Attendees: @karmatosed, @joemcgill, @mikeschroder, @swissspidy, @flixos90, @desrosj, @azaozz, @paaljoachim, @markoheijnen, @adamsilverstein, @jorbin, @designsimply

  • Media organization improvements:
    • @joemcgill opened up conversation about a feature project to start work on this, explaining that we have the chance to take a UIUI User interface/UXUX User experience first approach.
    • @karmatosed is going to head up the UI/UX side of things.
    • @joemcgill thinks the likely first step is exploration of base taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. support, and a review on how it is currently broken with media.
    • @karmatosed asked all those interested in working on this to create sketches of their ideal media categorization flow for review by next week.
  • Add new coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. media widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. (#32417)@joemcgill noted that the runway for 4.7 is ending, but work can continue for a future release. @designsimply to refresh the current patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. on the ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. by Monday (October 10), and may target images specifically as a first step (this is still missing a refreshed patch).
  • Rotate Full Size Images on Upload (#14459)@mikeschroder profiled this and found that while the clock time for checking and setting orientation is minimal, it took ~230ms for an iPhone 7-sized image to be rotated (total 5.6s resize time) on a shared test server. He thinks total resize time should be reduced before this is added, and that #37140 is a better step for 4.7. After discussion with @markoheijnen and @azaozz, consensus seems to be that benchmarking of upload vs manual rotation should be done to prove the UX case for #37140 over #14459.
  • Accents in attachment filenames should be sanitized (#22363)@joemcgill pointed out the new patch here from @gitlost, which looks promising. @swissspidy to take a look over the weekend (feedback is on ticket now, but could use more eyes).
  • Better PDF Upload Management (#31050) – Everyone likes this, but time running out for 4.6. @markoheijnen to target next patch by Wednesday (Oct 12) (this was moved out of the milestone, as it’s currently missing a refreshed patch).
  • Responsive images (srcset) can include images larger than the full size (#36477)@mikeschroder didn’t have time to performance test the patch. To do so shortly and post feedback on the ticket (feedback is on ticket now).

Agenda for the next meeting

This week, discussion will continue on priority projects for the 4.7 release. If you have specific tickets that you want to have discussed, feel free to leave a comment on this post or reach out on Slack in the #core-images channel.

Edit: Updated post per status on Wednesday, Oct 12.

#4-7, #images, #media

Media Weekly Update (Sept 30)

This post serves to jump-start discussion before the weekly check in, which takes place in #core-images on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. The next meeting is Friday, October 7 at 17:00 UTC and agenda for these meetings includes moving priority tasks forward, providing feedback on issues of interest, and reviewing media focused tickets on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress..

Summary from last week

The last meeting was Friday, September 30 at 17:00 UTC. You can read the entire chat log in the #core-images channel on Slack.

Attendees: @joemcgill, @mikeschroder, @swissspidy, @flixos90, @azaozz

  • Unexpected change to media title behavior in WP 4.6.1 (#37989)@joemcgill noted that @sergey found a fix for the remaining UTF-8 issues and it has been committed to trunktrunk A directory in Subversion containing the latest development code in preparation for the next major release cycle. If you are running "trunk", then you are on the latest revision., but needs to be backported still. @joemcgill working on getting this done. Test please!
  • Downscale to only smaller images with srcset (#36477) – It looks like a true fix is not likely to land in 4.7, since this would have likely been part of changing the way WordPress handles full size images. @mikeschroder and @joemcgill to test the current patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. for performance and SSIM.
  • Better PDF thumbnails (#31050)@markoheijnen was not able to attend, but previously noted that he is continuing work on this for a week or two to try to make 4.7.
  • WordPress image’s title is not alt (#34635)@joemcgill chatted with the AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) team about this, and the suggestion is that WordPress should no longer guess at an appropriate alt if the user hasn’t explicitly added one. He notes that this shouldn’t be that difficult to patch, but the change will need to be well communicated.
  • image_send_to_editor filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. is not fired when an Image is edited or replaced in TinyMCE (#34823) – Based on @adamsilverstein‘s feedback, it looks like the ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. should be closed, as there’s a different filter intended for this purpose.
  • Usage of image_size_names_choose breaks JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. attachment model attributes (#34981) – Chatted about a bit of background. @azaozz took a look and posted a new patch for review.
  • Sanitize accents in attachment filenames (#22363) – From @gitlost’s comments, it looks like there are fixes in remove_accents() necessary that should happen first, and would likely fix the base bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. here. His work on it is mostly in #24661. @mikeschroder to dig into the progress of Safari’s support of these filenames. Feedback from those who have strong knowledge in UTF/character encodings would be appreciated.
  • Rotate Full Size Images on Upload (#14459 and #37140) – Would rather not destroy EXIF/IPTC in full size images (with GD), so may be better to fix this in Imagick first. Needs performance testing. Comment left on ticket.
  • Add new coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. media widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. (#32417) – No updates here. May not be 4.7 at this point, but @joemcgill reaching out to @designsimply for status.
  • Media organization improvements:
    • Make media library searchable by filename (#22744) – @joemcgill added a patch to fix a JOIN issue found by @flixos90. Please continue testing this, especially with large media libraries.
    • @flixos90 opened a GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repo to work on media taxonomies/UIUI User interface, and is organizing a feature project around it. @joemcgill suggests an initial meeting with @karmatosed for high level direction, followed by changes in the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, or core directly where appropriate.

Agenda for the next meeting

This week, discussion will continue on priority projects for the 4.7 release. If you have specific tickets that you want to have discussed, feel free to leave a comment on this post or reach out on Slack in the #core-images channel.

#4-7, #images, #media

Media Chat

In the regular #core-images chat this Friday, 15 April, 19:00 UTC we are planning to discuss enhancements for 4.6. So far there are four items on the agenda:

  • We are planning to add responsive images to the editor and discuss different implementation methods, e.g. saving srcset and sizes attributes to the database versus generating them on the front end. See #36475.
  • The makers of TinyMCE recently released JavaScript image tools for editing images in the browser which could replace the current server based image editor. The new editor would be quite faster, allowing you to edit and resize images before uploading them, and it would be easier to include in other scripts. This may well be a feature project over a few releases.
  • PDF preview images. See #31050.
  • Continue to improve mixed content issues on HTTPSHTTPS HTTPS is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure. HTTPS is the secure version of HTTP, the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to. The 'S' at the end of HTTPS stands for 'Secure'. It means all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted. This is especially helpful for protecting sensitive data like banking information. sites. See #34945.

If you have more ideas or tickets to discuss regarding media, please join us or leave a comment here. 🙂

#4-6, #image-editor, #images, #media, #respimg

Performance improvements for images in WordPress 4.5

WordPress 4.5 includes a few performance enhancements for images.

Increased image compression for custom sizes

WordPress 4.5 increases the amount of compression applied to intermediate sizes by changing the default quality in WP_Image_Editor from 90 to 82. As noted in the proposal for this change, this results in a noticeable reduction in file sizes with little change in visual quality. Developers can override the default image quality value using the wp_editor_set_quality filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output..

Improved resizing settings for ImageMagick

For sites making use of ImageMagick, we’ve reduced file sizes further by resizing images  more efficiently in WP_Image_Editor_Imagick and by stripping extraneous metadata using the new WP_Image_Editor_Imagick::strip_image() method.

For now, ‘icc’ and ‘icm’ color profiles are retained, along with ‘exif’, ‘xmp’, and ‘iptc’ profiles, which can contain copyright and orientation data. Those who want to retain additional metadata can disable profile stripping by adding a callback function to the image_strip_meta hook that returns false.

Note that the original full sized images uploaded to WordPress are unaffected by these changes.

Introduction of wp_get_upload_dir()

As Jeremy Felt mentioned in his post on Multisite changes, wp_upload_dir() received a major performance overhaul in this release. Those changes were pared with the addition of a new function, wp_get_upload_dir(), which can be used as a more performant way to display information about the uploads directory on the front end. This is particularly useful when building URLs for images in templates. (See #34359)

#4-5, #dev-notes, #images, #media, #optimization, #performance

Proposal: Increase the default image compression in WordPress

This proposal was merged to coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.Core Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. in [36615]. Download the latest nightly build and give it a try!

In order to improve page load performance, I propose that the default image compression setting be changed from 90 to 82 in WordPress. Let’s get into why.

Background

The default quality setting for resized images in WordPress has been 90 since the image_resize() function was shipped in version 2.5. This setting creates images with much larger file sizes than recommended by modern web best practices.

Over the past several years, the importance of performance has been highlighted as users access the web globally on slower connections, and performance has even started being used by search engines to influence search results.

Tools like Google PageSpeed Insights and WebPagetest will warn site owners if images aren’t sufficiently compressed. For example, the glossary at the bottom of the WebPagetest performance optimization page states:

Within 10% of a photoshop quality 50 will pass, up to 50% larger will warn and anything larger than that will fail. The overall score is the percentage of image bytes that can be saved by re-compressing the images.

Research

With this in mind, web developer and performance advocate Dave Newton published recommendations for ImageMagick compression settings based on his research comparing various ImageMagick settings against Photoshop’s ‘high quality’ (60) setting for JPEGs. He found that an Imagick compression setting of 82 was closest to this using an objective measurement named DSSIM to compare the visual similarity between two images.

We experimented with Dave’s settings in the RICG Responsive Images plugin during the 4.3 cycle and found that not all Dave’s suggestions can be easily applied by default in WordPress due to the memory required to process large images on shared hosts. However, changing the default image quality setting is a relatively small change that makes a big impact on file size without sacrificing much in the way of perceived image quality.

In research released in 2014, compressed images with a DSSIM score of 0.015 were deemed acceptable to most people. In tests of several different images, I found that changing the default compression setting in WP_Image_Editor from 90 to 82 reduced image sizes by an average of ~25% with DSSIM scores ranging from 0.0014 to 0.0019 for ImageMagick and 0.0019 to 0.0023 for GD — both of which are drastically under the 0.015 threshold cited above.

Proposal

Given these results, I suggest making the change to 82 for the default image compression setting. You can follow the discussion on the related ticket (33642) and give feedback in the comments or in the #core-images channel on Slack.

As a reminder, this setting only applies to the intermediate sizes that WordPress creates, and not the original files uploaded by users. For any users who need to maintain a higher image quality for intermediate sizes, the default quality can still be changed with the wp_editor_set_quality filter.

#image-editor, #images, #media, #performance