X-post: Facebook and Instagram embeds to be deprecated October 24th

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on Facebook and Instagram embeds to be deprecated October 24th

X-post: Talking point: Handling support for commercial users on the WordPress forums

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/support: Comment on Talking point: Handling support for commercial users on the WordPress forums

X-post: Proposal: Dropping support for old PHP versions via a fixed schedule

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on Proposal: Dropping support for old PHP versions via a fixed schedule

X-post: External Linking Policy – Doodle for New Approach Discussion via Zoom

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/docs: Comment on External Linking Policy – Doodle for New Approach Discussion via Zoom

Reminder: Compatibility with Core Matters

Over the years we’ve gone from always showing all plugins in searches to devaluing plugins that aren’t updated in a time span to devaluing them if they’re not compatible with the latest few releases of coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. All of this is done to improve the user experience and to ensure they only find plugins that are actively maintained and compatible with the versions of WordPress they use.

As part of this, when a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is closed we currently require the ‘tested up to’ value to be, at least, the latest stable version of WordPress core. We have updated our emails for closures and re-scans to reiterate that, but it’s for a slightly different reason than helping users.

We want to help you developers. If no one can find your plugin, because it’s not compatible with (say) WP 5.5, then no one uses your plugin. Presumably, if your code is hosted here, you want people to use it. To help you and ensure your plugins can be found and used, we are requiring you update that, should we have any reason to close your plugin.

Just like you have to bump the plugin version so people get notified of updates, you need to make sure that “tested up to” value is current 🙂

So! Please keep that up to date! It’ll help people find your plugin, give them confidence in your work, and help make you more successful! Wins all around 🙂

#guidelines #reminder

X-post: Recommended usage of the Updates API to support the auto-updates UI for Plugins and Themes in WordPress 5.5

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on Recommended usage of the Updates API to support the auto-updates UI for Plugins and Themes in WordPress 5.5

X-post: WordPress 5.5 Field Guide

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on WordPress 5.5 Field Guide

X-post: Miscellaneous Developer Focused Changes in WordPress 5.5

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on Miscellaneous Developer Focused Changes in WordPress 5.5

Proposed Block Directory guidelines

The proposed guidelines for submitting BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Plugins to the Block Directory have been revised, with many thanks for the feedback and suggestions from developers and the community. If you haven’t had a chance to see them yet, you can read the most current version of the guidelines here.

In case you missed it, the Block Directory is a new feature coming in WordPress 5.5 that allows specially-written Block Plugins to be instantly and seamlessly installed in the editor, without ever leaving the page. In order for blocks to install seamlessly, they need to meet certain expectations.

These guidelines will be added to the official WordPress Detailed Plugin Guidelines, as a special section that applies to plugins submitted to the Block Directory. This set of guidelines would not apply to general plugins that happen to include blocks — plugins in the main pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party directory need only follow the standard plugin guidelines.

If you are interested in developing a special Block Plugin that will work in the Block Directory, here’s some new documentation and tools to help:

If you have feedback, comments, or questions about the proposed Block Directory guidelines — or about the tools or tutorials — please share them in a comment on this post.

#features #block-directory

X-post: PHP related improvements & changes: WordPress 5.5 edition

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/core: Comment on PHP related improvements & changes: WordPress 5.5 edition