You can now add your own plugins to the Block Directory

Introducing the BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Directory in WordPress 5.5

The WordPress 5.5 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. release that’s now in testing includes Block Directory support enabled by default. In case you missed it, the Block Directory is a subset of plugins in the plugin directory that can be instantly and seamlessly installed from the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ editor with a single click. We call these new plugins “block plugins” and have worked hard to make it easier for people to contribute to this new feature coming to WordPress 5.5. This post is meant to help show how to get your very own block pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party added to the directory and share some helpful resources along the way.

Step 1: Create your own block plugin

If you haven’t yet had a chance to create a Block Plugin, don’t fear! There’s still some time until the August 5.5 release. Here’s a new and improved tutorial that walks you through the process of creating a block plugin. More documentation is on its way too and you can join the discussion about what would be helpful to have shared in this GitHub overview issue.

The guidelines for Block Plugins are still in the process of being finalized. Block Plugins need to be much more minimal than a regular WordPress plugin in order to be safely installed with a single click. That means as well as keeping to the regular plugin guidelines you’ll also need to follow some additional rules. In particular, you should stick to mostly JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/. code and keep PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. to the bare minimum; and not add any UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. or other code outside of the Gutenberg editor.

Step 2: Run your block plugin through the checker tool

In order to help developers follow the guidelines and best practices, we’ve been working on some documentation and a new tool. It’s called the Block Plugin Checker. Give it a plugin repo URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org, and it will examine the code to look for possible problems to resolve before your block plugin can be added to the directory:

This is still a work in progress so if you find any fun bugs or omissions, please let us know. We’d love the chance to fix them and to make the Checker a more useful tool.

Step 3: Add your block plugin directly to the Block Directory

If you’re a committer of a block plugin that does meet the criteria for adding it to the Block Directory as confirmed by the Checker tool, you can then add it yourself using the same tool:

Likewise you can remove it at any time using that same tool if you notice problems or would prefer it wasn’t included. 

Going Forward

We’ll be making improvements to the Block Plugin Checker, and doing additional testing of plugins that are added, so please expect some changes along the way. If you have any feedback or questions, please comment here or in #meta on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

#features #block-directory

Reminder: Compatibility with Core Matters

Over the years we’ve gone from always showing all plugins in searches to devaluing plugins that aren’t updated in a time span to devaluing them if they’re not compatible with the latest few releases of coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. All of this is done to improve the user experience and to ensure they only find plugins that are actively maintained and compatible with the versions of WordPress they use.

As part of this, when a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is closed we currently require the ‘tested up to’ value to be, at least, the latest stable version of WordPress core. We have updated our emails for closures and re-scans to reiterate that, but it’s for a slightly different reason than helping users.

We want to help you developers. If no one can find your plugin, because it’s not compatible with (say) WP 5.5, then no one uses your plugin. Presumably, if your code is hosted here, you want people to use it. To help you and ensure your plugins can be found and used, we are requiring you update that, should we have any reason to close your plugin.

Just like you have to bump the plugin version so people get notified of updates, you need to make sure that “tested up to” value is current 🙂

So! Please keep that up to date! It’ll help people find your plugin, give them confidence in your work, and help make you more successful! Wins all around 🙂

#guidelines #reminder

Proposed Block Directory guidelines

The proposed guidelines for submitting BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Plugins to the Block Directory have been revised, with many thanks for the feedback and suggestions from developers and the community. If you haven’t had a chance to see them yet, you can read the most current version of the guidelines here.

In case you missed it, the Block Directory is a new feature coming in WordPress 5.5 that allows specially-written Block Plugins to be instantly and seamlessly installed in the editor, without ever leaving the page. In order for blocks to install seamlessly, they need to meet certain expectations.

These guidelines will be added to the official WordPress Detailed Plugin Guidelines, as a special section that applies to plugins submitted to the Block Directory. This set of guidelines would not apply to general plugins that happen to include blocks — plugins in the main pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party directory need only follow the standard plugin guidelines.

If you are interested in developing a special Block Plugin that will work in the Block Directory, here’s some new documentation and tools to help:

If you have feedback, comments, or questions about the proposed Block Directory guidelines — or about the tools or tutorials — please share them in a comment on this post.

#features #block-directory

RESOLVED! Plugin Update Issues – 18 June 2020

As of 21:45 ET on 18 June, this SHOULD be resolved.

The original post remains below.


We are currently experiencing issues with pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party updates properly displaying on the front end.

Systems is looking into this. We will have this resolved as soon as possible, however we do not have an ETA at this time. We ask for your patience and understanding.

12:31 ET – The issue has been identified, and the people to address it are being brought in. At this time, we ask you NOT attempt to push your code again. It won’t help.

12:46 ET – While we’re working on a permanent fix, we are attempting to manually clear the backlog. You may see some plugins updating, but this does not mean the issue is resolved.

13:10 ET – We’ve cleared out as much of the backlog as possible, however the issue has not been resolved. No new commits will go through. Again, please don’t try to push code. It’s still down.

15:15 ET – Some preemptive patches have been applied for when the fix is finalized, however updates are still not functioning properly.

17:10 ET – The situation is still ongoing. Our attempted fixes did not correct the issue.

19:20 ET – No ETA, fix is still being worked on. In the meantime, we’re devising a way to let us manually run the jobs without the need for system intervention, in order to ensure security fixes are pushed in a timely fashion.

21:45 ET – A commit has been made to properly trigger the cron job that does the magic. We believe the situation to be resolved.

Please thank @otto42, @ocean90, and @dd32 for their hard work!

#systems #downtime

Technically you always could, but…

Technically you always could, but now you can officially change the owner of a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party.

For most of you, this is going to be a “Meh, who cares” change. For me? Well, it’s always nice to let people take agency of their own plugins 🙂

In the newly renamed ‘Danger Zone’ of the advanced tab, we have a way for you to transfer ownership to someone. This must be done by the actual owner of the plugin, and they need to select the new owner from the drop down, which looks like this:

transfer

Why would I want to do this?

It’s pretty rare, but sometimes people want a specific account to be THE official owner of a plugin. Usually this relates to company-owned plugins.

Who’s the owner now?

The page will tell you who, but in most cases it’s whomever submitted the plugin.

Does it matter who owns a plugin?

Actually yes. At the end of the day, the owner accepts responsibility of everyone else who does things in the name of the plugin.

If I change the owner by accident, will you change it back?

You can ask, but we’ll have to talk to the new owner to make sure this was actually a mistake and not something else.

#features

SimplePie Updated for WordPress 5.5

An early commit for WordPress 5.5 (which isn’t even in betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process., don’t get scared) is a long awaited update to SimplePie! That’s right #36669 has finally gone through.

The library has been updated in WordPress trunk from version 1.3.1 to version 1.5.5. Trunk always contains the bleeding edge, unreleased WordPress code that is being worked on for the next release. When you have a chance, please take the time to test your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party on trunk to ensure you do not experience any issues or unintended behavior after this update.

Here are some resources that may help you:

  • A full list of changes in the library: https://github.com/simplepie/simplepie/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md
  • The changeset updating SimplePie in WordPress: https://core.trac.wordpress.org/changeset/47733

Later, we will be emailing people whom we feel would be directly impacted by this change, but for now if your plugin uses RSS feeds in any way, or directly integrates with SimplePie, we ask you take the time to check if everything is still working.

#updates #simplepie

You Are Now Able to Close Your Own Plugins

Edit: We tweaked the page to try and make it more clear that your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is OPEN (which is why you have the option to close it — can’t close a closed plugin right?). If you have recommendations or suggestions about a better way to phrase things, please leave a comment with your ideas 🙂

I am well aware of the confusion caused by releasing this today, but this isn’t a joke.

Starting April 2020 you have the ability to close your own plugin without having to email us and explain why!

How do I close a plugin?

Log in with a committer account and go to the ADVANCED tab on your plugin. There, you will see a CLOSE THIS PLUGIN section that looks like this:

Read the warning. If you understand that the change is permanent, and you still want to close the plugin, press the button. Like magic, your plugin will be closed.

Who can close a plugin?

Anyone who has COMMIT access to a plugin. So now is the time for you to check who you gave commit access to, and prune the list. Please keep in mind, if you are managing a company plugin, it needs to be owned by a company account who has commit access. This is for your own legal protection.

Can I reopen the plugin?

Not without emailing the plugins team (plugins@wordpress.org) and explaining why you changed your mind.

The purpose of this requirement is to limit abuse (it does warn you the closure is intended to be permanent) and create a better experience for users. If people are constantly closing and reopening plugins, it makes users doubt the stability and security of the plugin.

What if I don’t have access to a commit account? How can I close my plugin?

Email plugins@wordpress.org and explain what the situation is, we’ll help you sort it out.

#close, #features

Instagram is accelerating the end…

Instagram is accelerating the end of their current APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways..

Per a notice on https://www.instagram.com/developer/ no new clients can register, and soon some basic functionality will be changed.

We will be reviewing plugins that call these functionalities and, if they are not updated, will close them in order to prevent adverse impact on users.

If you know you’re not going to want to fix this, please email plugins@wordpress.org, provide a link to the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, and tell us you’d like us to close it. We know that Instgram (and Facebook) have been difficult to work with this last year, and fully respect and support your decisions here with regards to your plugins.

Here is Instagram’s announcement:

UPDATE: Starting October 15, 2019, new client registration and permission review on Instagram API platform are discontinued in favor of the Instagram Basic Display API.

To continuously improve Instagram users’ privacy and security, we are accelerating the deprecation of Instagram API Platform, making the following changes effective immediately. We understand that this may affect your business or services, and we appreciate your support in keeping our platform secure.

These capabilities will be disabled immediately (previously set for July 31, 2018 or December 11, 2018 deprecation). The following will be deprecated according to the timeline we shared previously:

  • Public Content – all remaining capabilities to read public media on a user’s behalf on December 11, 2018
  • Basic – to read a user’s own profile info and media in early 2020

For your reference, information on the new Instagram Graph API.

#instagram #api

2019 Insights

There’s been a lot of quiet change going on for Plugins, so now is as good a time as any to get into it!

If you’re interested in any details missing, leave a comment. I do ask you try not to speculate too much into the why’s and wherefores of what people do with plugins. I’ve been at this a while, and the one thing I can promise is people do weird things.

New Email System

We finally migrated off of the old system and on to HelpScout in March, which allows us the ability to sort and organize emails into teams. It also lets us properly filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. bad actors so not everyone has to deal with them. We make heavy use of automated filters now, which has let us do the impossible …

New Team Members

We onboarded two new team members in November and have been easing them in to the weird workload of Plugins. They’ve been instrumental in sorting out what filters and team assignments do and don’t work well for Plugins.

New Tools

I’ve been using a new bash script to expedite scanning plugins. While we’d love to use WPCS (and I personally recommend it to for everyone), even with a heavily parred down version it hasn’t quite met our needs. The goal for next year is to move the bash script into a PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party we can use to automate a lot more.

New Replies

Our saved replies (the standard ones you get for closures and reviews) have all been cleaned up, spellchecked, and formatted for easier reading. Now, when you get an alert that your plugin has been closed, we attempt to direct you on exactly how to resolve the issues. This is still a bit of a work in progress, but we’ve made great strides on consistent tone and softer language.

New Restrictions

Sadly as many people found out, we got dinged hard by some trademark owners, and are taking action against people who violate trademarks. Around 1000 plugins were closed due to that, and it’s one of those things we can’t protect you from. We’ve changed the plugin uploader for new submissions to blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. a lot of that.

Remember the basic rule: If it’s not your company/product/library, don’t begin your plugin Display Name or permalink with it!

(Trademark owners: Please ask the developer to changes things before coming to us. Communication will help everyone.)

The Stats!

A lot of people like this part. Here’s the overall outlook from 2019:

Chart showing the Requested, Rejected, Closed, Approved, and Pending plugins each week for 2019.

And in a slightly more consumable summary table:

RequestedRejectedClosedApprovedPending
Most in a week194109480118718
Least in a week1292925527
Average1612511776623
Year to Date8048122160383836N/A

We’ve had 1000 more plugins submitted in 2019 than 2018, however the Rejected and Approved numbers only went up by 100.

So where are the extra 800 plugins? On average, pending plugins did go down but only by about 25 a week. Most of the missing counts are there, but they’re also in the dreaded “Closed” section.

A higher than expected number of developers have submitted plugins for review and then asked them to be closed within a 6 month timeframe. This has led to us pushing back on people and making notes in their accounts about that kind of behavior. There hasn’t yet been a common thread to why that’s happening, so we’re keeping an eye out.

HelpScout Overall

HelpScout also helpfully provides their own statistics for how much we used them. This is just since March when we switched over:

  • Customers: 6665
  • Conversations per Day: 35
  • Busiest Day: Thursday
  • Email Conversations: 12,829
  • Messages Received: 17,439
  • Replies Sent: 18,931
  • Emails Created: 6650
  • Resolved: 6642
  • Resolved on First Reply: 31%
  • Closed: 11,818

HelpScout Saved Replies

We make heavy use of Saved Replies to speed up reviews and processing. These were brought in to use in chunks, and I’m omitting the exact numbers. They won’t do you any good to know we sent 2,679 “Approval after send” emails when you realize we also only sent 628 “Intro to new Review”. All that means is we pulled in the Approval email first. Next year these stats will be more useful.

All that said, I think having a look at what the most common sorts of issues are might be a little enlightening. Everything is ordered from most use to least.

Closed and Warned

These emails are sent out when a plugin is closed or the developer needs to be warned about issues/behavior.

  • Closed: Trademark Abuse (All)
  • Closed: Removal Request Completed
  • Closed: Security Exploit
  • Warning: Sockpuppets
  • Warning: Trademark Violation
  • Notice: Closed Becuase Email Bounced
  • Warning: Security Issue (NOT CLOSED)
  • Closed: General Guideline Violation

Reviews

All these emails are sent when a plugin is being reviewed.

  • Approval: Approval after send
  • Review: End Of Review (goes at the end of all reviews)
  • Review: Intro to new review (all new reviews start here)
  • Review: Please sanitize, escape, and validate your POST calls
  • Review: Generic function/class/define names
  • Review: Incomplete Readme
  • Review: Including your own CURL code
  • Review: Not using wp_enqueue commands
  • Review: Calling remote files (js, css, images, etc)
  • Review: Including Libraries Already In WP CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. (i.e. jquery)
  • Review: Calling file locations poorly (also hardcoding in paths)
  • Review: Including out of date libraries
  • Review: Undocumented use of a 3rd Party or external service
  • Review: Not using Nonces and/or checking permissions
  • Review: Using file_get_contents on remote files
  • Review: Calling core loading files directly (wp-config, wp-load, wp-blog- etc etc)
  • Review: Display Name infringes on trademarks (slug is fine)
  • Review: Using esc_ to sanitize (not esc_url)

Pended

A pended plugin is one we stop before even reviewing the code. This usually happens because someone’s infringing on trademarks, or using a personal account to submit a company owned plugin.

  • Pended: Name Infringes on Trademarks (slug and name need to be changed)
  • Pended: Never replied to previous review (was rejected)
  • Pended: Not Official Owner

Rejected

This should give you an idea of why plugins are rejected. Top of the list? People who don’t reply.

  • Rejected: Review never completed within 6 months
  • Rejected: Not Your Plugin (Tried to upload vs host)
  • Rejected: Generic for plugins we’re just not hosting
  • Rejected: Framework or Library Plugins
  • Rejected: New/renamed version of their own plugin

Miscellanous

The rest of the emails are lumped together. You’ll notice we have prefixes to what each email is. That helps us find them faster.

  • Notice: Plugin Restored
  • Reply: Plugin Slug Renamed
  • Reply: Rescan (Plugins must be checked before being reopened)
  • Thank You: Security Report
  • Thank You: Guideline Report
  • Reply: Don’t call people ‘sir’
  • Thank You: Generic, Will Review
  • Notice: AutoReply Sucks
  • Notice: Already Mailed Review
  • Approved: Resend Approval
  • Question: Why Close?
  • Reply: Cannot Rename Plugins (for people who email RIGHT after approval)

#statistics, #year-in-review

Trademark Enforcement

Many of you have received an email from us regarding pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party closures for trademark violations. These emails were absolutely not made in error.

Due to recent demands by trademark owners, we will now be more strictly enforcing trademark abuse when it comes to plugins. While it should be sufficient to tell you “Don’t abuse someone’s trademarks.” the reality is that those things are complex and confusing.

We will have altered our system to prevent the submission of those plugins that violate trademarks. This is not something we do lightly, however we have been compelled to close a great many plugins recently. It’s more efficient to prevent potential abuse than to clean it up after the fact.

How Trademarks Apply

Trademarks apply to the following aspects of your plugin:

  • The Slug – Your plugin slug may not begin with someone else’s trademarked (or commonly recognized) term
  • The URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org – You may not use someone’s trademark in your domain name
  • The Display Name – You may not begin the display name with someone else’s trademarked (or commonly recognized) term and, in many cases, you may not use the name AT ALL.
  • All Images – You may not use trademarked logos/images in your banner, screenshots, logos, etc

We do our best to take care of the first one – the slug – when you submit your plugin. Plugins approved pre 2015 with trademarks in the URL are ‘grandfathered’ in and permitted to remain. All plugins approved after 2015 are required to meet this restriction. All plugins, no matter when they were approved, must comply with trademark usage in display names and images.

We also keep our eye on similar names. There’s a concept known as brand confusion, so naming your company or plugin similar to another company (like Facerange, say) you can still be legally compelled to change the name. This is why, for example, you cannot use ‘pagespeed’ in your URL for a site optimization tool, even though Google’s only trademark is on ‘page speed’ (two words). The name is similar enough that we have been required to close plugins.

Additional Restrictions

In addition to the above, many brands have an above-and-beyond requirement. You must also avoid representing the brand in a way that:

  • Makes the brand the most distinctive or prominent feature
  • Implies partnership, sponsorship or endorsement
  • Puts the brand in a negative context as part of a script or storyline

Also many have statements like this when regarding applications specifically:

  • Don’t modify, abbreviate or translate the brand name to a different language or by using non-English characters, or use any logos to replace it.
  • Don’t combine shortened versions of the brand with your own brand.
  • Don’t use our ‘wordmark’

This is where it all gets crazy weird. But an example would be the brand Facerange. With the above restrictions, naming your plugin (which is an application) “WordRange” or “FacePress” and having it be a plugin to work with Facerange would be a violation of their terms.

It all comes back to making it painfully clear that you and your work have NO relationship to their products. Some allow you to use their product name wherever you want, and some won’t permit it at all. When in doubt, the best course of action is to assume you don’t have permission and not to use it.

Quick FAQ

Can I use ‘for BRAND’ in my plugin display name?

Sometimes. It depends on the brand. We don’t have a complete list, which makes this very complex. It’s important to pay attention to the rules for brand usage and application uses. Some brands have separate rules. In general, if they’ve trademarked their wordmark then no, you cannot use it for an application. And yes, a plugin is an application.

What’s a wordmark?

That’s the name. So Facerange’s wordmark would be “FACERANGE.”

I have permission from PayBuddy to use their wordmark/logo, is that okay?

We’d rather you not use it on your PLUGIN pages. It’s impossible for us to verify, and many agreements with brand owners are rescinded. Brand your webpage all you want, but leave their official logos and word marks off your plugin.

A brand contacted me directly and asked me to change things. Is that a real demand?

More than likely they are. They’ll usually include links and directions and contact information. Use that and comply with them, because if you don’t, they’ll come to us.

What about existing violations?

We’re handling them in batches. You don’t need to report them to us.

But if you haven’t closed them, why are you closing my plugin?

Because there are thousands of plugins and we do them in small batches for sanity. Also brand owners sometimes give us a priority list, and you just happened to be higher than someone else.

Don’t they get an SEO boost?

No. Write a better readme that uses the brands properly and contextually, and you’ll be fine.

Someone’s infringing on MY brand, what do I do?

Contact them first. Ask them to stop (nicely please). Link them to your brand documentation. If they ignore you, email us the same. We’ll close the plugin until they fix it.

We recommend you BE CLEAR about what you require. Remember, most people aren’t familiar with trademark laws and their intricacies, so it’s very easy for them to get confused.

#guidelines, #trademarks