https://make.wordpress.org/core/2021/09/27/changes-to-the-wordpress-core-php-test-suite/

Changes to the WordPress Core PHP Test Suite

Reminder: Trademarked Logos Cannot Be Used In Banners/Icons

tl;dr: Using someone else’s trademarked logo in your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party icons or banners is a trademark violation, and they have the right to have us remove your plugin at any time.

We’ve posted about this before, and it’s apparently time for a reminder. Logos for brands are generally trademarked. Those logos cannot be used in your plugins banners or icons unless you have their express permission.

Trademark infringement is the unauthorized use of someone else’s registered trademark. This means you are using their logos without permission. When we talk about misuse, it’s more clear to think about it in terms of physical products. Lets say you make electronic gizmos and they happen to work with MacOS. If you put Apple’s logo on your products, you would be infringing on their trademark. Basically you’re misrepresenting yourself in a way that implies or suggests that the trademark owner approves of your work when this is not true.

If you got an email from us (either a warning or a closure notice) about this sort of matter, please address it promptly. Check your banners and icons, and your display names, to make sure you aren’t in violation. Remove all trademarked logos from your plugin banners and icons (yes, even social media ones), and make sure it’s clear that your plugin is not an official plugin (unless it is, and then you don’t have to worry).

Some quick questions:

Why do trademark owners care?

Trademark owners who do not protect their trademark usage end up being unable to enforce it legally later on. So it’s in their best interests to monitor the use and prevent misuse. Also, customers often get confused about the origin of the plugins, and will complain to the wrong people if there’s an issue. Finally, you are essentially profiting from the goodwill that the trademark owner has generated.

Who actually complains to [company] about a 3rd party plugin!?

A lot of people, actually. A high number of people complain to companies and the companies come back to us and say we’re encouraging the behavior which causes confusion with users and a loss of trust in the trademark owners. After all, if your unofficial plugin breaks someone’s site, and they blame the trademark owner? Well that wasn’t fair at all.

Why are other people getting away with it?

They aren’t. They’re just living on borrowed time, as the saying goes.

We have getting close to 100k plugins. They are all monitored by humans (not automated for this one yet) and a human has to check if you had permission or not, if you’ve been warned or not, if your plugin merits a grace period or not, and if the trademark owner has officially demanded we close your plugin immediately. Plus a large number of people argue about this, which eats up time. We do things in batches to try and stay sane.

Also … we strongly recommend you never use that excuse. It makes you sound like ‘sour grapes’ or childish to argue that someone else didn’t get caught yet, so you should be allowed to keep breaking the rules. That just makes this process take longer for everyone.

I reported someone, but you didn’t do anything! Why not?

Unless it’s your trademark, we generally don’t do anything right away because, again, we have close to 100,000 plugins. The number of violations is high, and in order not to ‘play favorites’ we do them in the order we’ve got them. We don’t bump people higher (or lower) on the list just because someone complained or is our friend. That would be terribly unfair!

If it was your trademark, we probably did bump them to the top of the list. We do try to get the developers to fix things before we close (especially for larger plugins that would have a massive negative impact on the community), but this isn’t always possible.

Isn’t it fair-use to use social media logos for related plugins?

No. Besides the fact that ‘fair use’ doesn’t apply to trademarks, it’s a matter of how you’re using it. Social media companies usually give permission to use their logos on your website as a direct link to your presence on their ecosystem. So a bird links you to Twitter. However. That is not the same as using a logo for advertising which is what many of them consider banners and icons to be. Their argument is that WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ is not your site. We’ve argued about this, but some companies have slapped us with legal threats so there we are.

What about screenshots?

Some trademark owners demand we prevent that too, some don’t. I wish we had a clearer answer here, but just to grab an example, there is a certain social media company who doesn’t want to see you use the logos in screenshots. Meanwhile, there are other credit card companies who don’t mind. Keeping track of those is incredibly hard! We recommend you not use them in screenshots.

What if I redraw my own version of the logos?

Then you’re probably going to get a legal demand from the owner to stop because you broke their usage guidelines for the logo. We should note here, when you intentionally try to get around trademark law, you are effectively confessing guilt. You know what you’re supposed to be doing and you’re actively trying to get away with something? The trademark lawyers will be able to take you down in seconds.

How can I promote my plugin’s associations without violating?

First and foremost, the directory isn’t for promoting anything, it’s for listing. If you’re doing all this to basically be a big “Click Here!” method, you’re going about it the wrong way.

Now if you’re really asking “How can I improve my usage by getting people to click on my plugin?” then you start by making a great banner that is memorable.

Stop treating a banner or an icon as a billboard. You don’t need to show off what your plugin can do, you need to be memorable and noticeable. The best banners are the ones that stick in people’s minds, and the odds are not a single person remembers “Oh you’re the one with the logos in this order…”

But no, you don’t need all the examples of the possible social media uses on your plugin banner.

What about Display Names?

In general, you can use “For [Trademark]” in your display name. There are some vendors who are particular and won’t even let you do that. We do our best to try and warn you ahead of time, but sometimes vendors change things on us without notification. Most are pretty cool about working out a plan so we don’t have to close plugins, some are not. I wish I had a better answer there.

#guidelines, #trademarks

The WordPress 5.7 Email Has been Sent

The field guide is out and the email has been sent.

If you find your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party has been closed, it would be for one of the following reasons:

  • Email bounces
  • Auto replies continue after a warning
  • Email reply says the email address is no longer checked/in use
  • We have received the exact same out of office for 3 releases in a row

If your plugin is still open? Please re-read the field guide. It has some pretty cool stuff 🙂

WordPress 5.7 Field Guide

#email #field-guide #reminder

Journal Entry: Sockpuppet Emails

Posting here with a journal entry for reference: I was pinged in a few tweet storms in the past week, so I took the liberty of reviewing the email template that seemed to kick off both conversations (sockpuppetSockpuppet A false online identity, typically created by a person or group in order to promote their own opinions or views. Generally used to promote or down-vote plugins en masse. activity). I edited it for clarity, flow, and WordPress Voice. The issues that prompted the complaints on Twitter have also been resolved through direct communication.

Do You Make Widgets?

Please take some time to read and comment on the proposal to move Widgets to the Blocks UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it.!

Widgets to Blocks UX Flow Proposal

WordPress To Move to PHP 5.6+

WordPress 5.2 is due out at the end of April, and wit that release the minimum recommended version of PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. will be PHP 5.6.

Minimum PHP Version update

For most plugins this is a non-issue. While we recommend you update your “Requires PHP:” version in your readme.txt, this won’t change the functionality of your code. That field is a minimum version, so if your code works with 7.0 and up, you can set it to `Requires PHP: 7.0` and that will cover 7.1 and 7.2

Also keep in mind, this doesn’t change our policy on PHP versioning, which is to say we still do not have an official version requirement for PHP in your plugins. If you want to support 5.6 forever, feel free. If you want to require 7.1 and up, again, go for it.

You can use a compare to do the basic check:

version_compare( PHP_VERSION, '5.6', '<' )

And remember the goal for your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is “Don’t break things for users.” Stop them from getting fatal errors, and don’t run your plugin if you know it can’t work.

#php

https://make.wordpress.org/core/2018/12/13/backwards-compatibility-breaks-in-5-0-1/

Backwards Compatibility Breaks in 5.0.1

Notice: Community Code of Conduct Meeting 4 Sept

The Code of Conduct will apply to all pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party developers and their support crew, so we encourage you to be aware of these developments.

Community code of conduct next meeting: 4th September 15:30 UTC

#ccoc, #crosspost

https://make.wordpress.org/core/2018/05/01/javascript-internationalization-the-missing-pieces/

JavaScript Internationalization: The Missing Pieces

Reviewing the Guidelines – 2017

I do this regularly, but recently I received a comment that the guidelines were still too vague.

I need to stress that this is by intent. If we make guidelines like “You can only have 3 external links” then people will find ways to exploit that. However I do not think that guidelines are perfect. Which is why I’m proposing a minor update to them to address the following concerns:

  • Overall tense of guidelines made consistent
  • Update introduction for readability and unpack what we mean by keeping email updated
  • Explain the converse of 3
  • Put the important part of 5 on top
  • Add link to forum guidelines to 9
  • Add prohibition against harassment to anyone in WP
  • Clarify self-dismissible alerts are acceptable in 11
  • Changed tense of 12 and 13 to emphasize their importance
  • Grammar fix for title of 15
  • Fix reference to zips in 16 (upload now vs link to)
  • Reword title of 17 to explain that PLUGINS must honor…
  • Guideline 18 has received a full rewrite to clarify what rights we reserve and reiterate our promise to do this as fairly as possible.

You can see all the changes proposed here on GitHub

Please read the guidelines and leave comments or pull requests on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. The plan is to make these live in January 2018 so please jump in and help! Thanks.

#announcement, #guidelines