Accessibility Team Update: October 23, 2013

Thanks to @grahamarmfield for the new welcome message on Make WordPress Accessible and for the new page Get Involved with the Make WordPress Accessible Team.

We have draft theme check Accessibility Guidelines and need a tag to attach to themes that make it through the voluntary process to be approved as accessible themes. We decided to do some user research to determine which terms people use when searching. We will use that info to inform our choice of tags.

In order to help do that research the team decided to start a Facebook page to hopefully reach people we are not reaching now with this blog, our @WPAccessibility account, and our LinkedIn WordPress Accessibility Group. We will also reach out to our local WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. groups to help us do the tag research. Finally, we have asked @samuelsidler to find out if there are stats for theme search that we can use to further refine our selection of a tag or tags.

We will also review content inventory on this blog and pages and give some love to our Accessibility Codex page.

#accessibility, #team-reps, #weekly-updates

Accessibility Team Update: October 9, 2013

We discussed accessibility progress made by @grahamarmfield, @rianrietveld, Bram Duvigneau and others at WordCamp Europe. Rian wrote something about it: http://blog.rrwd.nl/2013/10/09/wordcamp-europe-2013-lessons-learned/

@joedolson and @sabreuse continue to help with the Twenty Fourteen theme.

We discussed communications channels: Twitter account @WPAccessibility, Make WordPress Accessible for public discussions of the group, an email list for prep work, the WordPress Accessible LinkedIn group for public discussions for everyone, and IRC discussions for working meetings. Also discussed was the possibility of creating a Facebook page which the group decided against doing.

@rianrietveld and @atimmer discussed setting up a testing environment and will continue that discussion offline.

#accessibility, #team-reps, #weekly-updates

Accessibility Team Update: October 2, 2013

The team discussed active tickets including https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/25054 3.8, sabreuse->(no owner), new, Twenty Fourteen Accessibility fixes.

A list of accessibility tickets: http://bit.ly/1glL1bH

A team member has set up an accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) test server pulling the updates for team use.

#accessibility, #team-reps, #weekly-updates

Accessibility Team Update: September 25

Most of the time was spent discussing https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/21334 3.7, grahamarmfield->helen, closed, Row actions are not always keyboard accessible. Helen Hou joined us for the discussion.

1. When mouse hovers over a page/post row in main Pages/Posts screen ‘quick links’ appear. Suggesting that they also are made available for keyboard-only users and screen reader users.

2. When using the QuickEdit panel the time/date controls have separate tabindex and no labels. Suggesting that the tabindex be removed from those controls, and that labels be used.

Discussion centered around the need to reduce verbosity for screen reader users, while still making the controls available to them.

It was decided to test the latest build and come back with a recommendation.

#accessibility, #meeting-notes, #team-reps

Accessibility Team Update: September 18

Cynthia Waddell smiling in front of shelves with law books.

Cynthia Waddell

AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) Statement Final Draft

“Accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible.” Cynthia Waddell

WordPress is founded on the principles of an inclusive community and democratization of publishing. The development of WordPress, based on standards and best practices, offers a constantly improving environment with flexibility and choice. We promise to always work toward creating an environment accessible to as many people as possible, inclusive of technology and ability.

We want community involvement and welcome feedback. Your comments help us enhance the accessibility of WordPress.

Resources

End Accessibility Statement

Projects To Be Followed

During the remainder of the meeting we discussed the projects we believe should be followed by the WordPress Accessibility Team. We agreed that we have too few people on the team to follow all these projects, but we compiled the following list.

#accessibility, #meeting-notes, #team-reps

Meeting September 11, 2013

We edited an accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) statement.

At the head of the statement is a quote by Cynthia Waddell: “Accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible.”

[Then comes the statement:]

WordPress is founded on the principles of an inclusive community and democratization of publishing. The development of WordPress, based on standards and best practices, offers a constantly improving environment with flexibility and choice. We promise to always work toward creating an environment accessible to as many people as possible, inclusive of technology and ability.

[The statement is followed by resources and contact information.]

Resources are available if you would like to learn more about WordPress accessibility.

We want community involvement and welcome feedback. Your comments help us enhance the accessibility of WordPress.

[Contact us here, and here, etc.]

#accessibility, #meeting-notes, #team-reps

Meeting September 4, 2013

Last week’s meeting focused almost entirely on developing a global accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) statement for WordPress. It was decided that the statement should be broad in nature, and that it will generally support accessibility with links to more specific information maintained by the WordPress accessibility team.

The voluntary accessibility theme check process was mentioned, that process is nearly ready to launch. Theme developers who have accessible themes and want to go through the process will be given a tag of #accessible-ready if the theme passes the accessibility checks.

Much thanks to Mel Pedley @esmi for her guidance and leadership as team representative for the past 18 months. I will now serve as team representative.

You can also contact us with words of encouragement or feedback on Twitter @WPAccessibility.

#accessibility, #core, #themes

Accessibility Team Update: Sept 2

The accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) team is still focusing on a global accessibility statement for WordPress and hopes to have a draft available for open discussion shortly. The theme access audits are now in a position to go “live” and we will be liaising with the Theme Review team on this over the next week or so.

After 18 months as team repTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts., I’m standing down. Joseph O’Connor offered to take this role on and his offer was accepted by the team during the recent IRC meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area.. I’ll be working with him during the handover period. In the meantime, we will be continuing to monitor current TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. tickets such as #24766 and the Features as Plugins Tracking list (thanks to Sam Sidler for giving us the heads up on this).

#accessibility

Accessibility Update: August 7

Current short term objectives:

  • Re-visit #23560 with a view to creating an improved patch.
  • Re-evaluation of MP6 to highlight/fix any accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) issues before WP 3.8. Some direction on where to post issues/tickets would be helpful here.
  • Examine and, hopefully, confirm, the recommendations in #24766

Long term objectives:

  • Publication of a WordPress Accessibility mission statement
  • Development of formal education and outreach programs
  • Growing the accessibility group and encouraging more feedback from disabled users.

#accessibility

Accessibility Group Update for July 18, 2013

We’ve been extremely busy lately defining a list of accessibility objectives for WordPress as a whole. Top of the list is the drafting of a WordPress AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) Statement in line with other open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. CMS applications such as Drupal & Joomla. We feel that this would go a long way towards solidifying the current work that is being done and providing a pathway for future development.

Selected themes are now being tested against the theme accessibility audit both as a services to some developers and as a way of ironing out any final issues before formally launching this as new initiative. A small sub-group are currently auditing the _s theme and the results from each auditor will be compared to ensure that we are able to provide a suitably standardised review process.

We are still concerned about the lack of real feedback from disabled users. Despite our best efforts, we recognise that commenting via the Make WordPress Accessible P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. blog may still be too intimidating for many non-technical disabled users. To that end, we are currently investigating the possibility of using short accessible surveys and/or mini-polls to increase end user involvement.

#accessibility