Announcement: Incident Response Training

TL;DR: Now that there is a first version of the code of conduct for the WordPress project, incident response training is available to anyone interested in learning more about how to take and respond to incident reports. Further, I would like to build a team who is prepared to help the WordPress community when something goes against the new code of conduct, and ask you to help me identify those individuals. 

A new code of conduct for the WordPress project has been announced! This is a great step towards helping current and future WordPress community members and contributors understand how we aspire to work together in “official” spaces. This code of conduct being new, I’m sure there are many questions around how it will be applied and carried out. 

To that end, the Community team has created training for incident response, covering topics like expectations when doing this work, how to take incident reports, and how to respond to reports. This training is now live on Learn WordPress, and available to everyone interested. 

Another important piece of this is helping people understand where they can go when they see behavior or actions that don’t match the code of conduct. I am excited to announce that a new incident response team will be created. To be clear, the responsibility of the incident response team is not to actively search for or monitor behavior. Instead, this team will be a resource to the community for when things don’t go as expected.

The work of taking and responding to incident reports requires a high degree of professionalism and emotional intelligence, and it is often invisible and difficult work. Because of this, individuals will be vetted and will need to complete training prior to joining the WordPress incident response team. Read on for all the details! 

How to join the WordPress incident response team

To best serve the community, incident response team members need to be able to remain calm when faced with difficult situations and possess exceptional listening and communication skills. When responding to incidents, they need to be able to maintain confidentiality* wherever possible, and think objectively. 

Because of this, I would like to request nominations to this team instead of asking for volunteers. Please complete the form below to submit your nomination of who you think would be a good candidate for this team.

Nominations will go through a vetting process similar to what the Community team does for organizers. For incident response team members, vetting will include:

  • Making sure they are in good standing with WordPress
  • Familiarity with WordPress and open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. practices is a plus
  • Perfunctory review of social media
  • Checking for compliance with the GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples.
  • Reviewing any examples of excellent communication

Further, it is important that the incident response team be diverse to reflect our global community, and this will be a consideration for the final make up of the team. The vetting will be done by myself (@angelasjin), @juliarosia, @ipstenu, and @kcristiano and @chanthaboune will give final approval. 

It is my hope that incident response team members can commit to being on the team for one full year. Depending on the volume of incident reports, they can expect to contribute anywhere between 2 to 20 hours a month. In addition, to help incident response team members be as successful as possible, they are expected to complete required training prior to joining the team. 

Training for the incident response team

While anyone can complete the incident response training on Learn WordPress, potential incident response team members will complete the same training alongside peers in a cohort. The cohort will meet synchronously four times (one hour-ish each), across the span of a month, to discuss incident response team training modules and practice through role play. There will be optional, highly recommended office hours and additional opportunities to practice learned skills. 

In addition, incident response team members will be required to complete DEI training, offered by an external consultant who will be prepared to offer DEI training for WordPress’ global contexts. 

The time commitment for this training will be approximately 2-3 hours per week at minimum, across five (possibly six) weeks. 

As with any team, I hope that we will continue to bring on new team members over time! While there are no immediate plans to have this cohort again, the intent with this first cohort is to put our best forward, gather feedback from the cohort, and iterate for the next group.

Questions? Comments? Feedback?

This is a brand new thing! What questions or feedback do you have? Share them in the comments below.

*A note on confidentiality: while the WordPress project tries to work transparently and in public spaces as much as possible, for the safety of community members, incident response needs to be treated confidentially wherever possible. However, anonymized, annual reports (similar to what the Community team has done in the past) will be published.

Themes team update May 24, 2022

Theme directory stats

Currently,

  • 0 new tickets are waiting for review.
    • 0 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 0 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 21 tickets are assigned.
    • 0 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 2 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 2 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 09 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 1 are approved but are waiting to be made live.

In the past 7 days,

  • 378 tickets were opened
  • 388 tickets were closed:
    • 371 tickets were made live.
      • 31 new Themes were made live.
      • 340 Theme updates were made live.
      • 1 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
    • 17 tickets were not-approved.
    • 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

Note: These stats include both the new theme tickets and updated theme tickets as well.

Number of reviewers: 4

BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Theme Stats

  • 4 Block themes is live in past 7 days.

HelpScout Stats

In the past 7 days,

Email Conversations 17Messages Received 17
Replies Sent 05Emails Created 01
Resolved 03Resolved on First Reply 100%

#themes, #weekly-updates

Plugin Review Team Update: 23 May 2022

PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 139
  • Plugins rejected : 19
  • Plugins closed : 228
  • Plugins approved : 48

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending)* : 484
  • → (older than 7 days ago)** : 408
  • → (2022-05-16 – 2022-05-23) : 56
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet)* : 1
  • → (pending; replied to)* : 483

Help Scout Queue Stats

  • Total Conversations: 737
  • New Conversations: 441
  • Customers: 467
  • Conversations per Day: 81
  • Busiest Day: Wednesday
  • Messages Received: 666
  • Replies Sent: 925
  • Emails Created: 281

#plugins

Documentation Team Update – May 23, 2022

Documentation Issue Tracker stats.

Current state

Past 7 days

1 Issue closed:

3 Issues opened:

7 Unresolved conversations:

6 active projects:

#docs

Share a Warm Fuzzy!

The term “warm fuzzy” comes from the story The Warm Fuzzy Tale by Claude Steiner. It was used in a technical sense to illustrate a specific concept in social skill development. But for the purpose of this post I’m going to define it as a “brief note that can brighten someone’s day, or bring a feeling of cheerful support”.

Who needs this Warm Fuzzy?

For folks who have been in the community for a while, you are probably aware that there are a number of people who work behind the scenes on administrative and infrastructural work. They do the type of janitorial tasks that I don’t feel comfortable asking self-sponsored folks to do.

One of those folks is our long-time contributor Otto. He’s been around practically since the dawn of WordPress and remains active via MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. and PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party reviews. I would like to remind him how much we appreciate him, and if he’s influenced you or your journey with WordPress, maybe let him know that, too!

#warm-fuzzy

Mobile Team Update – May 18th

WordPress iOSiOS The operating system used on iPhones and iPads. and Android version 19.9 is available for testing. Sign up here to join the betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. program on iOS or follow this link on your Android device, tap on “Become a beta tester”.

Highlights for the last two weeks:

  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Editor: We shipped the main functionality for Drag’n’Drop, added performance fixes, and fixes for the unsupported block editor, the editor toggle app setting, the gallery block link settings and the x-posts toolbar icon.
  • Other Projects: We made an improvement to the media picker on Android, and fixed an issue on iOS that prevented the site name to be updated from the Site Settings screen.

#mobile

Plugin Review Team Update: 16 May 2022

A number of plugins were closed for email-bouncing. Remember to keep your account email up to date!

PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 138
  • Plugins rejected : 14
  • Plugins closed : 316
  • Plugins approved : 37

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending)* : 478
  • → (older than 7 days ago)** : 382
  • → (2022-05-09 – 2022-05-16) : 75
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet)* : 23
  • → (pending; replied to)* : 455

Help Scout Queue Stats

  • Total Conversations: 724
  • New Conversations: 437
  • Customers: 465
  • Conversations per Day: 80
  • Busiest Day: Monday
  • Messages Received: 730
  • Replies Sent: 831
  • Emails Created: 207

#plugins

Documentation Team Update – May 16, 2022

Documentation Issue Tracker stats.

Current state

Past 7 days

1 Issue closed:

12 Issues opened:

25 Unresolved conversations:

6 active projects:

#docs

Plugin Review Team Status: 9 May ’22

The higher than usual number of closures is due to email bounces. We’ve got about 200 left to process. Some may have multiple plugins.

PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Status Change Stats

  • Plugins requested : 112
  • Plugins rejected : 11
  • Plugins closed : 197
  • Plugins approved : 37

Plugin Queue Stats (current)

  • Plugins in the queue (new and pending)* : 461
  • → (older than 7 days ago)** : 368
  • → (2022-05-02 – 2022-05-09) : 60
  • → (new; not processed or replied to yet)* : 25
  • → (pending; replied to)* : 436

Help Scout Queue Stats

  • Total Conversations: 847
  • New Conversations: 674
  • Customers: 576
  • Conversations per Day: 94
  • Busiest Day: Thursday
  • Messages Received: 966
  • Replies Sent: 821
  • Emails Created: 196

#plugins

Themes team update May 10, 2022

Theme directory stats

Currently,

  • 0 new tickets are waiting for review.
    • 0 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 0 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 25 tickets are assigned.
    • 0 tickets are older than 4 weeks
    • 0 tickets are older than 2 weeks
    • 5 tickets are older than 1 week
    • 11 tickets are older than 3 days
  • 1 are approved but are waiting to be made live.

In the past 7 days,

  • 306 tickets were opened
  • 297 tickets were closed:
    • 285 tickets were made live.
      • 13 new Themes were made live.
      • 272 Theme updates were made live.
      • 1 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
    • 12 tickets were not-approved.
    • 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

Note: These stats include both the new theme tickets and updated theme tickets as well.

Number of reviewers: 3

BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Theme Stats

  • 2 Block themes is live in past 7 days.
  • Currently, 4 Block theme are under reviewing.

HelpScout Stats

In the past 7 days,

Email Conversations 06Messages Received 06
Replies Sent 07Emails Created 00
Resolved 07Resolved on First Reply 86%