Recap for Training Team Meeting June 13, 2019

Attendance: @juliekuehl, @jessecowens, @man4toman, @chetan200891, @Janet357, @iwritten, @aurooba

Slack timestamp

Learn siteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. update

@chetan200891 is waiting on some stuff from the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team.

@man4toman created his first PR for review and an issue for the footer file that needs reviewing

@jessecowens has a working version of the markdown importer but is working on getting it recognize the JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. format, perhaps some folks at WCEU can help with that – potentially the WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ team.

@aurooba put together a README file for the Learn site beta repo to help if anyone else wants to jump in and contribute. She also has a PR almost ready for the workshop template, which should be ready for submission by Sunday.

As we’ve started to build out the Learn site, @juliekuehl identified some issues that have come up in the design – things that should be checkboxes are radio buttons, etc. We have to try and figure out how to make things happen in the Make environment without the use of additional plugins.

WCEU Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.

@jessecowens will be the acting lead at WCEU for the Training team, the rest of the team can join remotely.

Contributor Day is on Thursday 20 June from 8:30-17:00 German time (UTC +2) which is Central European Summer Time

Four lesson plans have been set aside for those contributors to focus on for the workshop Best Practices for WordPress Friendly Layout. Issues have been created for all of them, so they should be ready for people to address them. We’re hoping to get the workshop to an instructional review status by the end of WCEU.

@iwritten will do some research and printout Blooms.

@juliekuehl created a ZenHub workspace (you’ll need to log in with your GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ account to see the workspace) set up specifically for Contributor Day with all the issues that can be addressed during that day.

@juliekuehl is working on drafting a blog post up on P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. to help folks prepare to contribute to our team, and @jessecowens will review it.

There will be an assigned table (or a whole room) at WCEU Contributor Day for the Training team

Upcoming team meetings

As a reminder, due to WCEU there will be no regular weekly team meeting next week.

The following week @juliekuehl will be on vacation and @jessecowens will lead the meeting with a WCEU recap and update on everything

Open announcements/discussion

@juliekuehl noted that while we’ve been focused on WCEU, other things have been moving forward too. Instructional reviews. Updates to the style guide. Lesson plan pull requests.

Action Items

#contributor-days, #workshops

Recap for Training Team Meeting June 6, 2019

Attendance: @juliekuehl, @jessecowens, @iwritten, @man4toman, @kartiks16, @mukesh27, @aurooba, @viitorcloudvc, @chetan200891, @lisa

Slack timestamp

Learn siteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. update

@chetan200891 merged several pull requests that added the following new templates to the Learn site betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. theme:

If anyone else wants to help out with the development of the Learn site, there are clear issues with help wanted labels in the Learn site GitHub repository that you can ask to be assigned to.

@aurooba has a pull request almost ready to publish that will add a README file to the repository that shows potential contributors how to set up a local installation so they can properly contribute to the theme.

@juliekuehl: It’s going to be great to have a beta site to show to contributors at WCEU. It will help them understand how their work fits in.

@aurooba wants to discuss the transition to SCSS from CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. the next time @chetan200891 is available during the meeting as well – it will help with modularity and collaboration.

@chetan200891 is planning on adding responsive styling to the templates soon, it doesn’t currently exist. Also brought up the issue of lack of authentication fields on the Submit Lesson Idea page, and recommended that either the submitter be required to include their WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ username or email, or both.

@juliekuehl also suggested we add an area for objectives and recommended @chetan200891 go ahead and add these fields to the template.

@jessecowens has been working on the markdown importer implementation and the Custom Post Types code but would love help from anyone who’d like to assist.

Currently, @jessecowens is trying to get the manifest.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. script perfected reliably for the markdown importer implementation.

Slides Style Guide update

@Janet357 made some comments on the TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. card

@juliekuehl added some information to the Slides Style Guide page in the handbook and @jessecowens is planning on getting a video up today possibly.

WCEU Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.

The folks from the Calgary Contributor Day came up with a great list of workshops based on the ideas in this post (workshops are detailed in the comments), so the next step is to decide on a workshop to focus on as a team and tackle that during WCEU Contributor Day.

@jessecowens and the communications team came up with the following snippet for the day:

The training team has identified several workshops– series of lesson plans for a specific audience/learning outcome– and we’ll be doing a “Sprint” to complete one of them. The workshop we’ll be working on, Best Practices for WordPress-Friendly Layout includes the lesson plans Introduction to CSS, Web Fonts, Using the Theme CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings., and Using Child Themes.

Everyone agreed that this is a good workshop to start with and as work begins on it, more lessons will probably need to be identified and created.

Once WCEU Contributor Day happens, we can set priorities for other workshops based on the experience and feedback from WCEU.

ZenHub now has the ability to break out other workspaces and this can be useful to narrow focus and not overwhelm people as they begin to contribute.

@juliekuehl: I’m going to work on making more digestible versions [of ZenHub Workspaces] that people can use to look for issues that they can work on. Which also means that there’s a ton of issues that could be added to lesson plans

screenshot of the workspace for WCEU Contributor Day

@jessecowens recommended making issues in these 4 plans to manage Contributor Day more easily.

Documentation will need to be created on how to get set up and use ZenHub if we want to use it during Contributor Day. @aurooba volunteered to kickstart the ZenHub documentation if someone (@juliekuehl volunteered) takes her through it once.

@juliekuehl: So right now there are only two “Workspaces” – the big, ugly master one and one called “Contributor Day” which is in preparation for WCEU. I can imagine adding a “New Contributors” workspace and then labeling the issues with the skills required to complete them.

Upcoming team meetings

@juliekuehl: WCEU is two weeks away and we will not have a meeting that week. So that would be 20 June. But we will meet next week (13 June) and be back again the week after WCEU (27 June)

Lesson plan assignments and updates

The WP-CLI lesson plan has been added to the team’s reposrepos The Training Team uses GitHub for working copies of lesson plans. You can find them at https://github.com/wptrainingteam. and is looking great!

#contributor-days, #handbook, #workshops

Recap for Training Team Meeting May 30, 2019

Attendance: @juliekuehl, @man4toman, @iwritten, @chetan200891, @aurooba, @Janet357, @viitorcloudvc, @jessecowens, @kartiks16, @iwritten

Slack timestamp

Learn SiteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. Update

@chetan200891 worked on the Custom Metadata for the learn site, which can be found here.

Everyone’s comments and feedback are encouraged. For those contributors, who would like edit access, please reach out to @chetan200891.

Getting Started Info / Handbook Update

@juliekuehl made significant progress on cleaning up and streamlining the Getting Started info in the Training Handbook to make it leaner and clearer.

@iwritten went through it today to learn and found it very helpful, so that’s good feedback!

The new glossary tool is activated on the Training Team blog, if there are other definitions anyone wants to suggest, please let @juliekuehl or another team member know!

@aurooba shared the open source plugin link for anyone who may want to take advantage of the feature.

@juliekuehl: I believe that the Handbook could still use some work around our actual workflow processes, but with the Learn site still in development some of those may be changing which is why we haven’t documented those just yet.

@jessecowens noted that there should be more videos and a lot of people concurred.

The move to ZenHub from Waffle.io for GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ project management also impacts the workflow, and there are a lot of new features that can be taken advantage of. This will also need to be documented.

Style Guide update

@janet357 worked on the Style Guide and made good progress! The more comments and feedback on Handbook Information the better!

Workshop focus / Calgary Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.

Reference: https://make.wordpress.org/training/2019/05/25/a-small-shift-in-focus/ (and the comments!)

The Calgary Contributor Day contributions included brainstorming and fleshing out outlines for 8 potential workshops targeting different audiences that the Training team could work on.

@juliekuehl noted a lot of lesson plans that were included are in various stages of development and completeness.

@Janet357 mentioned that the next is step is to decide which workshop to start on and list the lesson plans to be used. These become top priority.

@juliekuehl: So, what I’d like the team to do at this point is to think about those suggestions and make comments as to whether or not they think they are the right ones or if there are others that should be included. Then I’d like us to get down to the specifics of choosing a workshop to begin with and decide which lesson plans would be a part of it and build those out. Then we could move on to the next workshop. Basically do sprints to get a workshop built out.

@aurooba volunteered to create TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. cards for each workshop that has been suggested after she’s given access. @juliekuehl will also make an “Other Workshop Ideas” Trello card.

Everyone should comment on the Trello card for the workshop they feel can be one of the first ones to work on.

WCEU Contributor Day

If everything can be put in place in time for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe, the aim is to do a couple sprints on workshops to get them fleshed out and completed. Beginner workshops will take precedence and will likely be the first few to be fleshed out and completed.

@juliekuehl and @jessecowens were thinking if it’s possible to also do a sprint on the learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ there too with the help of another team.

@aurooba suggested that the tasks left for the website be added to GitHub. @juliekuehl will go through and create issues (in the repository https://github.com/wptrainingteam/learn-theme-beta) for all the tasks noted in the Trello card (https://trello.com/c/HgCQ6Jlp). @chetan200891 also felt that getting help from a different team would be helpful!

Lesson plan assignments and updates

A repository was created for the WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ lesson plan that @tristup created, now it just needs to be submitted using a PR request by @tristup to https://github.com/wptrainingteam/wp-cli.

There have been a few pull requests. Some of these still need to be reviewed and a few more have come in since the last queue clean out.

The team focus is coming back to including lesson plans, and the plan is to focus intensely on them after WordCamp Europe.

Open announcements/discussion

@chetan200891 shared GitPod, which is an online IDE for Github, that is easy and fast to use. You can work directly on Repo. Edit, Preview and Submit PR. It’s free for open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. projects! He made a video on how to work using it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmCEyyzctbk.

@juliekuehl mentioned that this may become the recommended way to work on lesson plans for the Training team and contributors. She’ll add the video to the Getting Started section in the Training Handbook.

Action Items

Tasks without a specific person assigned are for anyone who’d like to contribute.

  • Provide comments and feedback on Custom Metadata doc.
  • Provide comments and feedback on Style Guide and Handbook.
  • Suggestions and feedback on which workshops to focus on, on this post.
  • @aurooba: create Trello cards for each workshop that has been suggested
  • @juliekuehl: Make an “Other Workshop Ideas” Trello card.
  • Comment on workshop Trello cards to indicate which one you think should be prioritized
  • @juliekuehl: Create issues for tasks left for Learn site in GitHub
  • @tristup: submit lesson plan to WP-CLI lesson plan repository
  • @juliekuehl: add this video to the Handbook
  • There are some lesson plan PRs to review still

#contributor-days, #feedback, #handbook, #workshops

4 Tiers for Workshops

As planned by @JenMylo during Community Summit

Tier 1: Getting to know WP

  • setup/install, use all features, intro to concepts of themes/plugins/coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress./open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL.
  • popular free plugins (the ones you put on every site you set up for someone)
  • where to learn more (wordpress.tv, local communities, docs, etc)
  • jetpack (outsource to jetpack team for content creation since third-party pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party)
  • setting up a store (outsource to woo, other ecomm plugins)

Note: Goal: they can set up a site for a small business with the most commonly requested features and customize it using the dashboard. they become able to contribute in support forums (beginner questions) and doing subtitles

Tier 2: Leveling Up (assumes knowledge of HTML and CSS)

  • Troubleshooting basics (swipe old curriculum that @ipstenu is hosting still)
  • Intermediate troubleshooting (create more learning examples like what’s in the basics but harder)
  • Plugins & Themes: where to find them and what to do with them (how to tell a good one, dealing with conflicts, etc)
  • Modifying Code – child themes, customizing with css in jetpack (for simpler things that don’t need a whole new child theme, also bc it’s what is used on WC sites so they can contribute there), looking at plugin code

Note: Goal: they can do fancier sites, give better advice, do more in support forums, etc

Tier 3: Theming (assumes knowledge of html and css)

  • build a theme from _s (borrow heavily from the themeshaper tutorial)
  • php basics for theming
  • design and ux for theming
  • intro to the theme repo (include talk of licensing, code requirements for repo, etc)
  • submitting a theme to the theme repo, how theme reviews work

Note: Goal: they can build custom themes, can answer theming questions in forums, possibly start trying their hand at theme reviews

Tier 4: Specialized/Advanced skills

  • Build a plugin (and into repo)
  • Running multisite
  • BuddyPress, member plugins
  • Advanced troubleshooting
  • Contributing to core
  • JavaScript wackiness
  • More advanced PHP
  • all the things not covered in lower tiers

Note: Goal: they can become a wp professional, can contribute to any of our contrib teams

#workshops

Recap of November 10, 2015 Meeting

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

  1. Welcome
  2. Recap of last meeting
  3. Making workshops out of lesson plans
    1. We need your help to create groups of lesson plans (proposed workshops). You can read more about why we’re doing this and also add your ideas for workshops to our post on this topic!
    2. After we have a rough list of workshops, we will make a push to complete any lesson plans that will work across workshops.
    3. As a team, we’re going to try to get an average of one proposed workshop a person this week.
  4. Lesson plan progress – no updates
  5. Testing progress
    1. Pittsburgh MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. Tested Conditional Tags last week and will be testing the LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. on Thursday. @torlowski is/was presenting both and we will submit feedback ASAP.
  6. Quarterly Lesson Plan Audit
    1. We are doing our quarterly audit to determine an accurate list of plans people are currently working on. If the plan you are listed with is correct, please pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” @abuango or @bethsoderberg to let them know. If you can no longer work on the plan listed, please ping and let us know. We’ll ping people in our Slack meetings for the next three weeks and the list will also be in the meeting recaps.
      User Lessons
      managing menus @wpnzach
      what can you do with WordPress @meaganhanes
  7. Training Handbook Outline
    1. @courtneyengle has created an outline for how the training documentation could be organized.
    2. The handbook discussion will be the first priority of next week’s team meeting.  We’d like to get set at that time so that we can start actually creating the content, especially any super important details, before the WCUS contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. on dec 6. At this time, it’d help if you can review what’s on the outline above.  Next week, share if we’ve overlooked any areas, if there are things that you think will help orient new people to the team, how we can continue to make it clear how and what the training team does, etc.
  8. WCUS
    1. Getting ready for #wcus will be the focus of the team meeting on November 24.
    2. We’ve been working on a few foundational areas as a team, and will have an opportunity during WCUS Community Summit to hopefully finalize some things. @courtneydawn has been heading up our efforts on providing slides to lesson plan instructors.
    3. Please, please, please comment on the slides post!
    4. If you’ve tested plans, please comment on this post about what slides you did/did not use.
  9. Contributor days
    1. Will anyone who attends the training team meetings be attending the WordCamps/Contributor Days in Berlin or Orlando this coming weekend? If so, please ping @courtneyengle or @bethsoderberg

#contributor-days, #slides, #wcus, #workshops

Making Workshops Out of Lesson Plans

The lesson plans that the training team produces are intended to be modular. This means that it should be possible to easily string a few plans together in order to create a cohesive workshop. This is why we are always trying to ensure that all individual lesson plans ultimately meet the following criteria:

  1. narrow in scope
  2. consistent in format, style, and voice
  3. factually accurate (both technically and historically speaking!)
  4. peer reviewed through copy editing and testing

An idea that has been bandied about the team for some time is creating suggested workshops so that someone could use a group of lesson plans in a workshop format without having to dig through our materials to  figure out what which plans would work well together, which plans are actually complete, etc.

We are at a point as a team where we have a solid group of completed lesson plans, but where I suspect that the plans we have completed can’t necessarily be strung together to create cohesive workshops. So, in order to expedite the creation of suggested workshops, we need to do the following things:

  1. identify which lesson plans would be included in a particular workshop (note: a single plan can 100% be included in multiple suggested workshops)
  2. identify which of the plans identified to be included in the workshop have already been completed, which are in progress, and which haven’t been started
  3. recruit volunteers to work on the plans that have been identified as “in progress” or “not started

This post is intended to be a place where we can start brainstorming step one as a team. Which lesson plans (both complete, proposed, and perhaps not proposed) would be ideal to string together into workshops?

The workshops you are proposing do NOT need to include lesson plans that are 100% complete. The proposals will likely be tweaked as the team moves forward in exploring the creation of workshops, but will be a starting point for the team to create a more strategic plan to identify which lesson plans should be written and tested next.

Please leave your ideas for proposed workshops in the comments!

#workshops