Training Team Profile Badges – Final Proposal

The Training Team proposes the following criteria for their profile badges:

  • Team On-boarding (Required): You have joined the #training channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., been added to the TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. board and the GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ organization. You have read through the Getting Started information (https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/getting-started/) and are familiar with the lesson plan template, the team’s workflow, and the teams tools (GitHub, ZenHub, and Trello). You understand the various channels of communication and know when and how they should be used.
  • Training Contributor:
    • Writing – You have developed an approved lesson plan from scratch or completely rewritten one that was out of date. Your efforts have moved a lesson plan from the “Drafts in Progress” stage to the “Instructional Review” stage in Trello.
    • Copyediting/Reviewing – You have contributed five (5) pull requests in GitHub. Or you have successfully moved a lesson plan from the “Copyediting in Progress” stage to the “Style Guide Review” stage OR from the “Style Guide Review” stage to the “Ready for Final Review” stage in Trello.
    • Testing – You have completed a testing feedback form after using a lesson plan in an event and have created GitHub issues for any suggested changes.
    • Auditing – You have audited three (3) lesson plans or surveyed the team’s GitHub reposrepos The Training Team uses GitHub for working copies of lesson plans. You can find them at https://github.com/wptrainingteam. and created GitHub issues for any needed changes.
    • Connecting – You have made three (3) workshop recommendations by combining existing lesson plans and submitting your ideas through the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site (when ready).
    • Other – the team may choose to award the badge for other contributions at the team’s discretion.
  • Training Team: You have admin rights on GitHub, Trello, ZenHub, and/or the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. You assist with final reviews of lesson plans. You regularly contribute to meetings or the maintenance and management of the team. You have been involved within the past twelve months.

Awarding of profile badges: There will be a monthly review of contributions, and badges will be awarded at that time. A list of the new profile badges awarded will then be posted on the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. If you feel that you have earned the badge but were not listed, please leave a comment on that month’s blog post and include your GitHub username and your WordPress.org username.

#badges, #procedures

Common Styling Issues in Lesson Plans

In last week’s team meeting, I brought up a few common styling issues that copy editors have noticed while editing lesson plans. As promised, I’m expanding that list here. For more details on many of the items referenced in this list, please refer to the style guide.

Issues we’ve seen frequently include:

  • Lots of different kinds of quiz formatting. The quiz formatting is outlined in the style guide, so take a look at that when writing out quiz questions.
  • Random horizontal rules. We don’t need these to separate major sections (e.g. “Teacher Notes” from the “Hands-On Walkthrough”), but watch out for them because they are included in some plan drafts that were created a long time ago. Please DO use horizontal rules if they make sense to separate sections of content within the hands-on walkthrough section.
  • Capitalizing WordPress specific terms and phrases like “Posts,” for example. Unless a word is a proper noun in general, we don’t need to capitalize it.
  • Absence of punctuation. Sentences should always end with the appropriate punctuation!
  • Misspelling of WordPress. WordPress has a capital “P” and should never ever be spelled with a lower case “p.”
  • Inclusion of random notes. Once you’re done with your lesson plan, make sure you’ve deleted any notes you wrote to yourself as you were working!
  • Absent quizzes. Be sure to include 1-3 quiz questions for your lesson plan. If you’re not sure what the questions should be, that’s ok. In this case, flag that the quizzes are absent before sending the plan to copyediting.
  • Absent exercises. Be sure to include an exercise that would take approximately 5-10 minutes to accomplish. As with quizzes, if you’re not sure what the exercise should be, flag that an exercise is absent before sending the plan to copyediting.

We’ll be using this list to create a checklist for lesson plan authors to go through before submitting their plans for copyediting and for copy editors to use while editing, so please list any additional items you’ve noticed in the comments!

 

#procedures

Recap for November 17, 2015

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

  1. Welcome
  2. Lesson plan updates
    1. @jillbinder‘s speaker lesson plans are nearly done.  Once they are done, this will be our first complete “workshop” series.
  3. Testing updates
    1. Expect testing feedback on the lesson plan “The LoopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop.” from @torlowski.  There were some challenges while testing this recently, causing a delay in the meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and change in testing plans. They will try again in January.
  4. Quarterly lesson plan audit
    1. User Lessons – Any plans that are on this list that I don’t hear back from anyone on by next Tuesday will be opened up for others to work on.
      managing menus @wpnzach
      what can you do with WordPress @meaganhanes

  5. Discuss training handbook outline.  Do we move lesson plans out of Handbook?  (see why it was moved to handbook)

    1. If so, where will lessons be housed?
    2. Pros & Cons:
      1. pros of leaving the lesson plans where they are:
        1. less work (don’t have to move them)
        2. maintain sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. navigation for the lesson plans
        3. all documentation and all lesson plans stored in one content type
        4. can remediate some of the content type sameness through custom menus, but then URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org structures may not be consistent
      2. cons of leaving the lesson plans where they are
        1. potentially confusing long term URL structure
        2. loss of sidebar menu
  6. Updates on making workshops from the lesson plans
    1. @juliekuehl  will figure out which plans have been completed in the workshops that have been proposed and what the status of each plan is
  7. Slides reminder
  8. Questions

 

#procedures

Recap of October 27, 2015

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

  1. Welcome
  2. Daylight Savings Time in Europe last weekend and US next weekend.  Training team will continue to meet at 17:00UTC.
  3. Recap of last meeting
  4. Tagging on old training team blog posts
    1. @courane01 has gone through all posts on our team site to organize tags and categories.  Descriptions of each tag and categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging. will be documented in the upcoming team handbook.
    2. @linnifred would like a “Get Started” category as well.
  5. Welcome Wagon
    1. Welcome new meeting attendees with this
  6. Lesson plans status and questions
    1. @jillbinder “So I have two versions and I’m not a detail-oriented person. I need some help from someone who is to create the master plans to submit to your team.”
      1. This will be suggested for the WCNYC contributor day this week.
    2. @melindahelt has been added to the Choosing and Installing a Theme lesson plan
  7. Testing status and questions
  8. Is there any progress on reviewing changes in WordPress 3.9 and up?
    1. @mikemueller and @judylw have made progress through WordPress 4.0
    2. They will see what can be done before WCNYC contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.
  9. WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. NYC Contributor Day – how would it be useful for volunteers to contribute?
    1. Combine less plans @jillbinder will send to @bethsoderberg
    2. List lesson plans impacted by WordPress updates on spreadsheet
    3. @bethsoderberg will write a post for WCNYC detailing what people can do to contribute
  10. Questions

If you have any other agenda items, please add them in the comments below!

#content-audit, #contributor-days, #procedures

Recap of October 13, 2015

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

  1. Welcome
  2. Recap of last meeting
  3. Lesson plans status and questions
  4. Testing status and questions
    1. Feedback provided on “Anatomy of a Lesson Plan” via Pittsburgh WP MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area.
  5. Update on slide decks from tested plans
    1. Upcoming blog post with a list of tested plans that we’re looking to collect slides from, hopefully in the next week
  6. Continuation of the location of team documentation discussion
    1. Our handbook is currently being used to store our lesson plans.  This is confusing for those looking for our handbook.
    2. Pain point: the confusing nature of the “empty” lessons that have been started with just the template and are sitting there in the handbook
    3. Suggestion to make the lessons plans that are in-progress not public
    4. The web address https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/ says that it is a handbook, but in fact it’s the parent page for Lesson Plans. (@courtneyengle)  It reads visually as a page error – I was waiting on something to load (@irishguy)
    5. No matter where we store Lesson Plans – that top page for them is awfully blank… like no book cover art.  It’s just a jump to the table of contents.  It’d be weird if that were a paper book
  7. Review of plan to ensure accurate lesson plans and call for volunteers to get this started
    • Moving forward we will use a new column in our Lesson Plan Tracking Spreadsheet  titled “Ongoing Review” to identify the lessons that need to be revised because of changes to WordPress itself. Team training will divide responsibility for monitoring changes to WordPress itself between regular contributors to the team and contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. volunteers. The tracking process will cover major or point releases and will include the following steps:
      1. We will use the change logs found in the Codex (example: https://codex.wordpress.org/Version_4.3) and the releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. blog posts (example: https://wordpress.org/news/2015/08/billie/) to determine whether there are plans that need to be updated.
      2. If a component of WordPress is significantly changed in an update of the software itself then we will run a keyword search to flag ALL lessons that mention that component.
      3. We will review the flagged lessons and remove any from the list that aren’t affected.
      4. Any lesson plans with confirmed updates required based on updates to WordPress itself will be redirected to the team training queue of plans that need content updates made to them
  8. Upcoming Contributor Days
    1. Documentation on current WordPress releases can be found in the Codex (see Current Version of WordPress at https://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Versions) and on the Blog in the “ReleasescategoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging..
    2. We’re only looking for possible inaccuracies on the lesson plans that are approved for testing.
      1. One person to scan through the point releases and make sure nothing beyond security stuff is in them that would impact the plans. It is identifying “if a component of WordPress is significantly changed in an update of the software itself” and noting what that change is.
      2. Run a keyword search to flag ALL lessons that mention that component.
    3.  @mikemueller volunteers to start reviewing lesson plans approved for testing compared with WordPress 3.9.  Mike Mueller and @judylwh will collaborate for WordPress 4.0 accuracy.

 

#content-audit, #contributor-days, #procedures, #slides

Recap of October 6, 2015 Meeting

Slack Log  (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account)

  1. Welcome
  2. Time Zones – Our team meetings will continue to be 17:00UTC when daylight savings time happens in the US and Europe and anywhere else. Our team site now displays the next meeting time in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. in a way that is now localized to the time zone you are in. YAY!
  3. Recap of last meeting
  4. Slides – We are still working toward what needs to be done before WCUS to submit our official request for slides, and what/how they are created, etc. Please comment on our P2 post! We had a little impromptu discussion on slides and what kinds of comments we’re looking for to propel our conversation forward at WCUS. We talked a little about the PDF option specifically and had the following questions/thoughts:
    1. Is there a workflow that we could use that would result in PDF only slides that would be able to be created by and edited by anyone, regardless of whether or not they have licenses for proprietary software?
    2. One of the concerns with PDF is that it can’t be edited. Perhaps if we go with a slide pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party (that makes the slides HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. of some sort) is that it has an “export as PDF” option. That way if something is updated in the lesson plan, then the PDF will be updated when the presenter exports one as needed.
    3. A possible existing plugin to explore in terms of capabilities: https://wordpress.org/plugins/html5-slideshow-presentations/
  5. Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. calendar
    1. We now have a calendar of upcoming contributor days. Thanks to @judylwh for getting this populated!
  6. Lesson plan updates
    1. The customizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings. user plan is up for grabs if anyone would like to work on it.
    2. @meaganhanes will take on the What Can You Do with WordPress plan.
  7. Testing updates
    1. The Pittsburgh meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. is testing the Anatomy of a Theme plan tomorrow
    2. We received feedback from the Intro to CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. plan that was also tested at the Pittsburgh meetup
    3. @bethsoderberg will make a list of plans that have been tested and will post something to the P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. requesting all existing slide decks from people who have tested plans. We’ll use what we gather to inform our slides conversation.
  8. Location of Documentation
    1. What are the pain points with the current structure of where data is located on make.wordpress.org/training?
      1. We are not easily able to find our stuff or know what stuff there is to find. – @juliekuehl
      2. Our main navigation menuNavigation Menu A theme feature introduced with Version 3.0. WordPress includes an easy to use mechanism for giving various control options to get users to click from one place to another on a site. contains some of this stuff… but doesn’t include what we’ve started to come up with for other things… like our new procedure for audits and contributor days. – @courtneyengle
    2. What needs do we have in terms of organizing documents and collateral for the training team?
      1. We need to be able to find our stuff efficiently. – @juliekuehl
      2. If EVERYONE else is using the [handbook to store documentation], we should too. – @mikemueller
      3. WordPress TV’s is an example of a handbook that we all love: it is accessible, organized, etc. – @courtneyengle, @mikemueller, @meaganhanes
      4. We need to dig back into the archives and also consider what belongs in the handbook, and then think about where to store the pages that contain lesson plans. – @courtneyengle
  9. We started talking about how to move forward with reviewing plans to make everything up to date per our larger conversation on ensuring accurate lesson plans. We ran out of time and will loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. back to this next week.

#contributor-days, #procedures, #slides, #testing

Where should we store documentation?

Right now the documentation is scattered about make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//training. Some of it is in the regular navigational structure, but quite a lot of it is hidden within the P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. blog. Especially as the team is currently focused on streamlining processes and inventing new processes for things that need it, we need a centralized place to keep all of our documentation.

After looking through all of the other Make sites, it seems that the other teams nearly universally use the handbook  to store their documentation. Thus far, we’ve used the handbook to store lesson plans in progress only.
 
The questions we have for the team are:
  1. What are the pain points with the current structure of where data is located on make.wordpress.org/training?
  2. What needs do we have in terms of organizing documents and collateral for the training team?

Thus far we’ve identified some of the problems, but need to think through and determine if there are other issues that we haven’t considered yet. Finding a solution for this one will take some time and thought – please note any thoughts you have either on pain points (question 1) or team needs (question 2) in the comments below.

Note: This topic was initially discussed during our regular team meeting on September 29, 2015.

#procedures

Recap of September 29, 2015 Meeting

    1. Greetings
    2. Recap of last meeting
      1. We need further input from the team regarding what we want to see for Slides.
    3. Lesson plans status and questions
    4. Testing status and questions
      1. @melindahelt will be testing the Anatomy of a Theme next week
      2. @melindahelt anticipates feedback on the Intro to CSS lesson tested last week
    5. Contributor day process proposed and ratified process moving forward:
      • Someone monitors the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. sites and adds any upcoming contributor days to a shared calendar so that the team knows they are coming.
      • We will use that calendar to determine what posts need to be scheduled in the P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. to go out for each event.
      • Different people can take the lead on writing each post.  Remember that prescheduling on the P2 appears in UTC.
      • Each post will include instructions for the participants to leave their comments/progress as comments on the P2 post and to go to SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. to ask questions, ideally of a pre-established person who will be on call and check for messages throughout the day.
      • If an in-person human is available, then questions can go first to them, then to Slack. Posting the questions on Slack also allows for others on the team to jump in when we see things if the on-call person isn’t there at the moment.
      • During our team meetings we review the feedback from the P2 posts and make assignments amongst ourselves to make changes to the plans according to whatever feedback we’ve received. (or other changes, etc.)
      • @judylw will review WordCamps listed on Central for Contributor Days and add them to our shared calendar until this ticket is resolved.
    6. Location of training team documentation
      • Consideration for using the team handbook as a handbook on procedures, and moving Lesson Plans to Custom Post TypeCustom Post Type WordPress can hold and display many different types of content. A single item of such a content is generally called a post, although post is also a specific post type. Custom Post Types gives your site the ability to have templated posts, to simplify the concept. or Pages.
    7. WordCamp US Brainstorm
    8. Training team will observe 17:00 UTC for meetings, no matter the daylight saving time changes globally.

 

#contributor-days, #procedures, #wcus

Recap of September 8, 2015 Meeting

  1. Greetings
  2. Recap of last meeting
    1. Key points include that abandoned plans will be reviewed quarterly and our next review will be in November. Also we’ll start using categories and tags on the P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. more consistently. New tags will be assigned during team meetings.
  3. Slides
    1. Please take a look at the slides post on the P2 and leave your thoughts in the comments. We need feedback from the team to move forward with this process. Specifically we are looking for ideas of what you think a slide solution NEEDS and DOESNT NEED and specifics if your idea is already there so that we know how to describe/implement the idea. We need a workable list of requirements by the WCUSA meeting in December.
  4. Lesson plans status and questions
    1. @courtneydawn is still working on the Local InstallLocal Install A local install of WordPress is a way to create a staging environment by installing a LAMP or LEMP stack on your local computer. lesson plan.
    2. @mikemueller is still working on the Managing Media lesson plan.
    3. The lesson plan tracking spreadsheet now has correct titles for all of the plans and also has links from the spreadsheet to the plans.
    4. @mikemueller compiled the reviews from lesson plans from the East Bay MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and details are available in this Google doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/11oxmPS9LGCLRd_SyjuydoJr0pvZt4Qo8yJw8Y6ZIcXA/edit?usp=sharing. We will review and discuss these items next meeting and make recommendations on what should be changed in the lesson plans.
  5. Testing status and questions
    1. @courtneydawn is testing the child themes lesson plan next week, but the include/enqueue issue needs to be updated. Does anyone have time to make this edit to this plan? Please DM @courtneydawn if you have time.
    2. @kdrewien completed feedback on the four lesson plans she’s tested.
  6. WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. Onboarding
      We want to review the intro language on the blue box to more fully describe the goals of team training.
    1. Our previous conversations regarding Contributor Day Onboarding are summarized here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AAjcvs_r2SO6dYc5T47Iok4BeGJ7ZIfALvQuBLvH3zE/edit

#contributor-days, #procedures, #testng

Ensuring Accurate Lesson Plans

The training team has recently initiated a conversation about how we will ensure that the lesson plans that our team produces will continue to be up to date when WordPress itself is updated.

Questions we have asked so far include:

  • When do we start tracking our plans to make sure they are up to date?
  • Do we start tracking after the plans have been copy edited and ready to test?
  • Do we only pay attention to completed approved plans?
  • How should we track the changes to WP and which plans they may impact?
  • How and who will do the updating of content?

In the fall of 2014 we explored an idea in our meetings and at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. San Francisco about adapting the Content Audit pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party or something similar for use in tracking changes from the dashboard of make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//training. This was an idea that was thoroughly researched and documented by @juliekuehl in this post: https://make.wordpress.org/training/2014/11/08/request-for-the-content-audit-plugin/. Moving forward, we should continue this conversation as part of the larger conversation about how to ensure accurate lesson plans.

The conversation has boiled down to two fundamental issues that we need to address, which are:

  • What process will we use to make sure plans are up to date?
  • When is a plan considered “complete enough” to start tracking to ensure it is accurate?

This post will be the place where we keep a running documentation of our conversation around this issue. Please leave your thoughts in the comments!

#content-audit, #procedures