Training Team Meeting Recap – January 11, 2024

This meeting followed this meeting agenda in GitHub. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

Introductions and Welcome

There were 22 attendees:  @bsanevans@webtechpooja, @gwallace87, @sierratr, @piyopiyofox, @lada7042, @sancastiza, @courtneypk, @eboxnet, @digitalchild  (async), @amitpatelmd (async), @jhimross (async), @robinpal (async), @vanpariyar (async), @hellosatya (async), @onealtr (async), @devmuhib(async), @quitevisible(async), @psykro (async), @sumitsingh (async), @sakibsnaz (async)

We’ve had some new people join the channel recently. @kawsaralameven@karson9, @corinaburri, @arkenon@dev0ghost@wpdata, @up1512001, @shadabali,  @bridgetwes, @ohthatspaul, @akojif, @lefadev22@josiahw93, @flexseth, @mgoncarova — Welcome! 

News

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes in this handbook page.

Looking for feedback

Each year, the Training Team takes some time at the beginning of the year to brainstorm goals for the year. We’ll be hosting two sessions next week, so feel free to join either… or both :star2: Sessions will be recorded for folks to watch later and anyone can add feedback in the session threads in Slack

  • Help the team brainstorm contribution ideas for the team to work on at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Asia 2024.

WordCamp Asia is almost here, and Training will be hosting a contributor table at the event. Thank you to our table leads @west7 and @digitalchild for volunteering

The Training Team continues to update and clarify the requirements of applying for a team badge. Jonathan has started a conversation for us to clarify the requirements for code contributions. Please leave your feedback on the post by January 26th 

Looking for volunteers

Each week, the team hosts a dev-squad triage session, where they triage website development GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issues. In that process, the squad mark issues they think would be great for first-time contributors to start on. 

One of the content types Training publishes on Learn WordPress is – Online Workshops. As we start the new year, we’d like to invite anyone in the team to apply to host or co-host a workshop this year.

Updates from last week’s dev-squad triage session

Off for the holidays- check for the next meeting

If you’re interested in participating, come visit the #meta-learn Slack channel at 7:00 UTC. You’ll find the time shown in your local timezone on the Training Team’s meeting calendar.

Other News

Next week’s team meeting will be conducted over a video call and will focus on brainstorming 2024 goals. The call link will be published in the Training channel 5 minutes before the meeting starts. If you’d like to attend with audio only, or just join in on the Slack threads, that would be great, too

Open requests for review

Currently, we have 15 pieces of content in the review stage. That’s exciting! You can find the list of content here:

Project Updates

 Learning Pathways on Learn WordPress is one of the biggest priorities of the Training Team right now. Here’s an update on how that project is going.

  • We have some first-draft redesign edits and thumbnails up for review, and will connect with Design re: the next steps next week:

Open Discussions


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#contributor-days, #dev-squad-triage-session, #developers, #learn-wordpress, #meeting-recap

Training Team Meeting Recap – 10th October 2023

This meeting followed this meeting agenda in GitHub. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

Introductions and Welcome

There were 21 attendees:  @piyopiyofox,  @sumitsingh,  @webtechpooja,  @chetan200891,  @nahidsharifkomol,  @devmuhib,  @iqbalpb,  @jdy68,  @psykro,  @sancastiza,  @nayanchamp7,  @karthickmurugan,  @huzaifaalmesbah(async),  @lada7042(async),  @sierratr(async),  @west7(async),  @courtneypk(async),  @benjirahmed(async),  @quitevisible(async),  @mebo(async),  @vanpariyar(async)

We’ve had several new people join the channel recently. Let’s get introduced to 7 new people here: @Stuti Goyal @Vincent Martinat @Lisa Sabin-Wilson @zstepek @Nabin @Parag Wadhwani @Rashi Gupta  

News

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes in this handbook page.

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes on this handbook page.

Looking for feedback

Updates from last week’s dev-squad triage session

This week, the dev-squad triaged 2 new PRs and one new bug:

There was some discussion around #1880, which the dev squad would like to bring to the team.

Other News

Please see the Nomination for Training Team Reps 2023 post for details on how we handled nominating new team reps last year. We are hoping to make this process more clear for future reps and potential leaders.

  • Badges Rewarded  – Congrats @Muhibul Haque! Thank you for your contributions to the team.

Open requests for review

See our Guidelines for reviewing content to review the following content.

Tutorials

Translated Content

If you are able to pick any of these reviews up, please comment on the issue directly.

Project Updates

Open Discussions

The discussion topic at hand revolves around GitHub issue #1880, which involves adding IDs to headings for anchor links on the website. The dev squad is seeking clarity on whether to use sentence case or all lowercase for internal anchor link fragments. The HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. spec doesn’t specify a requirement, but lowercase is the common practice.

The dilemma is whether to formalize and document this practice across the site. @Jonathan suggests switching to all lowercase, but this would require a thorough review and update of existing lesson plans. The group is open to discussion on this matter.

@Destiny raises whether this issue will still be relevant if the content is consolidated according to the new information architecture for Learn. @Jonathan mentions that it depends on whether the “Tip” section in the Lesson Plan synced pattern is carried over to the new content types. Removing the tip section entirely is a possible solution.

The group agrees that the new architecture may change the current situation, so they consider merging the PR and addressing individual lesson plans on a case-by-case basis.

Asynchronous participants are encouraged to share their thoughts on the GitHub issue. @Jonathan notes that it’s essential to consider the impact of the new architecture.

The conversation ends with @Destiny mentioning a request for members of the dev-squad to review and test a PR for the Sensei Pro upgrade created by @Jonathan, asking for help from contributors with developer experience.


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#learn-wordpress, #meeting-recap, #training, #training-team

WCUS Contributor Day: Tutorials Workshop (In-Person & Remote)

TL-DR – Tutorials are incredibly daunting work–at least, they can be if you’ve never done it before. I would like to demystify the tutorial creation process for interested training team contributors, both for those who attend in-person and with a follow-up remote session for team members who will not be in attendance at WCUS.

Objectives for this workshop:

Contributors will be able to…

Part One:

-Write strong learning objectives and descriptions
-Write tutorial scripts either on their own or through utilizing (and spot-checking) AI
-Revise each other’s work for accuracy and voice

Part Two:
-Utilize technology to record strong screencasts and visuals
-Create video tutorials for learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/
-Review tutorials for learn.wordpress.org in public (in person and online)

Pre-Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.Prepwork

1. Generate or identify a list of potential easy (and high value) tutorials people could write, add to the GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repo. TagTag Tag is one of the pre-defined taxonomies in WordPress. Users can add tags to their WordPress posts along with categories. However, while a category may cover a broad range of topics, tags are smaller in scope and focused to specific topics. Think of them as keywords used for topics discussed in a particular post. them explicitly with “Contributor Day” to allow us to follow up on these topics at a later date.

2. Create a sample website that can be downloaded from our Github repo and installed (using Local or WordPress playground) to save time on people creating sample sites of their own.

3. Create a community repo / Google Drive (for simplicity) to create folders for the resources created for each in-progress tutorial, which will be linked to in each Github issue.

4. Create a dedicated tools list from the handbook page with the specific tech we will be using.

5. Optionally: We could see who might be interested in doing this ahead of time– who may plan to attend contributor day.

On Contributor Day:

Morning Session 

1. Building Background Knowledge – Onboarding Session: Welcome to the team, how we use the Github board for tutorials, join the team for the day (or longer!)

2. Topic selection! Contributors will pick a topic from the list and/or suggest a topic [and get it approved]. We will go over expectations for what and how to write on Github.

2. I Do / We Do / You Do: Once topics have been chosen, we will start by writing our learning objectives and topic descriptions on the Github issues. As an ID, I will walk around and ensure topics are bite-sized and that the objectives are measurable. We will discuss the importance of strong learning objectives and how they help learners and educators alike.

3. Collaborative Script-Writing: Contributors will write scripts about their chosen topics, potentially using AI to help generate content. They will collaborate with each other and spot-check their work for accuracy. They will add their scripts to their Github pages.

Afternoon Session

4. Tool time! Contributors will download pre-selected screen recording technology (Descript and Openshot most likely), the pre-created sample website (so that work can continue on their tutorial with or without them in the future), install Local (or utilize WordPress Playground), make a copy of the team’s Google Slides, learn where to find visuals, and get started making screen recordings.

5. Direct Instruction: I will teach contributors one process for recording tutorials. As people work, they can upload their work to whatever repository / Google Drive folder, and update their Github comments as they work.

6. Screen Recording Time: Contributors work on recording screencasts to match the scripts for their tutorials. They will upload and link their screen recordings so they can be utilized at a later date and potentially polished if we run out of time.

7. Review time: Contributors who finish will review each other’s work and add reviews to Github.

If they finish entirely, we will have them write quizzes for tutorials.

For Remote Contributors

These same sessions will be adapted for and offered in shorter, recorded online workshops the week after contributor day, and posted on the Learn Online Workshops Calendar. They will also be recorded and added to Learn’s recorded online workshops.

The Ultimate Goal: 

Have contributors record rough drafts of tutorials–and potentially finish them! Since we are in person, we may be able to review work as soon as it is finished (in public on Github, but also in-person)

At any point, a contributor can walk away from the table, leaving a note in their Github issue of where they finished their day, suggestions for next steps, and if they plan to continue working on the tutorial. We will explicitly let people know a deadline for when we may open their tutorial up to others to work on to ensure their lovely content makes it to learn.wordpress.org. They can let us know if they plan to come back and work on it async over WCUS or later, but we will let them know that if they do not come back, another contributor may pick up their work to finish it.

While I know that in the past, people haven’t followed up on finishing their content, I believe we can tag it and leave topics better than we started, complete with strong learning objectives, instructor-approved descriptions, a well-written and spot-checked script, potentially strong materials for recording, or even totally finished tutorials.

Post-Contributor Day

1. Sort content into finished / in progress work, create publishing calendar.

2. Follow-up: For contributors who noted they would like to continue to work on tutorials, we will check to see that they have done so. If they have not completed their work by a certain deadline, we will aggregate their work and allow general content creators to continue working on their topics.

What I need from you:

  1. We need ideas! What are some learning topics that you think might be great for first-time contributors to make a video about? A topic that we can learn about WordPress in 3-5 minutes or less. These can come from the Ready to Create – You Can Help section of our Github or be entirely new–as long as they’re not on learn.wordpress.org at the moment.
  2. Are you interested? Let me know here! If you’d be interested in attending these sessions either in-person or in a workshop, please let me know in a comment below. This doesn’t mean you’re locked into attending, it will just give me a good idea of how many people I might expect so I can plan efficiently.

Thank you, team!

#contributor-days, #learn-wordpress

Analysis and results of the Individual Learner Survey

This post presents (i) a summary of the findings of and (ii) an analysis of the results of a survey focusing on the needs of individuals when learning about WordPress. It is part of a fuller and evolving Needs Analysis to identify the most useful and high-impact resources and content for Learn.WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. The findings will help guide the future development of this community learning tool.

Preparation for the wider Needs Analysis of WordPress training and skill development began in detail in 2022. It included collaborative sessions to formulate survey questions, developed methodologies to better understand training needs, and ensured surveys were linked to the vision for the free-to-use Learn WordPress.

Key opportunities for the Make WordPress Training team and the implications for cross-working with other teams are highlighted in each of the areas identified in this report. Some of these opportunities will be developed further to identify priorities and time scales, phasing work to optimise the benefit to users and adding value to the project.

Geographic spread

Analytical tools showed that almost all the initial responses to the survey were from the US. To broaden the geographic spread, other regions where content was known to have originated or where interest had been expressed in creating content for Learn WordPress were identified by @webcommsat, @nalininonstopnewsuk and @west7.This data was also matched to locales where there were established links through polyglots and WordPress Translation Day. Requests were submitted directly to individuals and groups in those regions to raise awareness of this survey and to encourage participation and feedback. The returns cut-off date was extended so that it could be presented to attenders at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Asia. It was a learning point for the survey team that marketing and awareness raising encompassing a wide range of geographic areas was vital and needed to be done at a much earlier stage in the life-cycle of any subsequent surveys.

The initial target of 300-400 respondents was met and surpassed. A total of 583 participants completed all of the survey. There were a number that did not complete the survey, and steps were taken during the survey’s life to address drop-offs. This learning will also be fed into future surveys.

Respondents by region

Region # of participants (583)
Africa 28 
Asia106
Australia and Oceania12 
Europe 115 
Middle East17
US and Canada277 
South America28

Note: if a respondent was using a Virtual Private Network (VPN), the survey may have recorded a different regional allocation. This discrepancy could have contributed to the apparent increased response rate from the US.

In response to the question, what is your primary language, 59 different languages were reported. Thirty-one percent of respondents would value more materials to be made available in their primary language. As Learn WordPress was only first piloted at the end of 2020, its vision is to grow and encourage resources to be available in locales in addition to English. 

Opportunities

The survey responses gave some examples of potential Training team follow-ups with the Marketing and Polyglots team, and locales where there may be interest in translating or creating resources in other languages.

The data will help the Training team in prioritizing potential follow-ups to encourage awareness and participation in communities where the survey showed a significant engagement and call for materials in local languages. This will also be added to existing data in the team which shows where there has been engagement and interest in contributing to Learn WordPress.

Familiarity with WordPress

This question was crucial in the survey and will be important in ongoing research as parts of the Needs Analysis. Better understanding how users who were willing to complete the survey describe their knowledge of WordPress is crucial to providing content and links at the most suitable level. This affects type of content, its presentation, its language-usage including technical terms, and more. Though this survey can only give us a snapshot view, its results backed up anecdotal findings, and confirmed that there is a considerable need for outreach and awareness raising of the Learn.WordPress.org provision outside the ‘already aware’ or ‘experienced WordPressers’. From informal research and anecdotes with other teams, it is assumed that there will be some variation between how people might describe their familiarity or skills with using the software with what their knowledge level may be. This is a challenge for a training resource, but supports the need for step by step course structures which can help users measure their own skillsets against and support the creation of a benchmark of learning. This benchmark may in future years lead to certificate levels, but even without that, a well used Learn.WordPress.org which becomes the place for step by step learning and achieving standards or levels in learning has a considerable value and benefit to users and the project as a whole.

A total of 321 people described themselves as ‘somewhat knowledgeable’ or ‘very knowledgeable’ of the WordPress software, which potentially equates to medium of advanced level in how content is being prepared more recently. This compared to a total of 262 who described themselves as ‘unfamiliar’, ‘somewhat familiar’ (potentially equating to a beginner level) or ‘neutral’ which could be seen as an indication of a lack of confidence or being in the early learning stages of the software.

Bar graph of respondents familiarity with WordPress where 221 out of 583 people are somewhat or very knowledgeable with WordPress.

Current WordPress Users: 

A breakdown of the current WordPress users based on their experience with the platform is below:

A side bar graph of respondents' experience with the platform where the number of years respondents had used WordPress ranged from 29% for less than one year to 32% for more than 10 years.

The number of years respondents had used WordPress ranged from 29% for less than one year to 32% for more than 10 years.

Opportunities

This shows there are a number of potential opportunities, including:

  • to interest and gain following and lifelong learning usage from new users
  • to produce materials that could be of interest or could be made by users of considerable experience

Roles of WordPress Users 

According to the data, the current role of WordPress users, who completed the survey, is mainly as follows. The highest number of responses were from people who described themselves in the categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging. of combined group of Freelancer, Solopreneur or Boutique Agency at 33%, followed by the Developer/Engineer category at 19%. Content Creator at 8%, and Hobbyist/Side Project at 8%. Other roles include Project Manager at 2%, User at 2%, and Trainer/Educator at 5%. Additionally, there are smaller percentages of role choices as: Product Owner/Product Manager, Support, Marketing, Designer, WordPress-adjacent events, Quality Assurance, Dev Ops, and Learner. 

The number of respondents are listed below:

A sideways bar graph of the current role of WordPress users where the majority of people identified as freelancers, solopreneurs, boutique agencies, developers/engineers or a role that did not match the list provided.

The ‘Other option’ in the table above relates to where the provided descriptions did not match the respondent’s own perception of their role in WordPress. The team is aware that ‘Side project’ group may also include users who work in WordPress category as developers or freelancers etc, but WordPress may not be their principal work or income-stream. 

Opportunities

This data shows a considerable engagement in a detailed survey on Learn WordPress from freelancer, solopreneurs and boutique agencies at 32%. 

Current Offerings 

It has been observed that 20% of all respondents said they did not currently utilize any of the resources available on the learn.wordpress.org platform. However, among those who do, the most frequently utilized resources in descending order are tutorials, courses, online workshops, and lesson plans.

A bar graph of the resources used on Learn.WordPress.org where tutorials and courses are ranked as the top two learning resources.
A pie chart highlighting that the majority of the respondents use more than one type of resource on Learn.

Opportunities

The data shows a significant number of users are using more than one resource, with 29 per cent using four or more resources on Learn.WordPress.org. This shows there is a potential opportunity that once users are familiar or aware of Learn WordPress, they will use it for multiple training formats. This can help influence the team’s thinking on how resources can fit together into courses, and related materials can be highlighted to increase the time learners are able to use Learn WordPress and to make their learning journey more useful, structured, smooth and seamless.

The current learning methods 

Based on the survey responses, the most popular learning method among the respondents is:

A sideways bar graph showing the methods people choose to learn.
  • web-based learning (410 respondents)
  • Learn.WordPress.org (290 respondents) 
  • on-the-job training (229 respondents). In the long-term, Learn.WordPress.org could play a big role in this area, and the opportunities for it can be a follow-up for future surveys and discussions/ promotions with organizations and employers who use WordPress.
  • conferences came in fourth with 115 respondents (this may have included WordCamps too).

Some other learning methods mentioned include: 

  • mentoring and coaching (93 respondents)
  • books (84 respondents)
  • In-person (bootcamps, classroom) (79 respondents).
  • college/university (27 respondents)
  • social media (24 respondents)
  • Google search (12 respondents)
  • trial and error (11 respondents)
  • blog posts (10 respondents)
  • self-learning (10 respondents)

The survey did not specifically mention WordPress meetups or WordCamps. Respondents may have also classed these as in-person learning.

Opportunities

Mentoring and coaching can and is likely to have come through local WordPress networks, such as meetups and WordCamps. This combined with anecdotal information from WordCamp Asia 2023 and WordCamp Europe 2021 shows that these granular events can be a powerful way for Learn.WordPress.org to help users improve their knowledge and keep up-to-date with the software and find ways to participate in the community.

Qualifying this data, some respondents referred to self-learning, which could be either web-based or in-person learning, or a mixture of both. The same issue applied for those choosing on the job training and bootcamps. The Individual Learner Survey was a starting point for the research and improvements into Learn.WordPress.org, and these are some of the areas identified for further exploration. 

Broadly, the survey responses at face value indicate a clear preference for web-based learning, but also an ongoing significant use of in-person learning. This supports wider research into emerging training practices and preferences outside WordPress. The data analysis context also has a bearing as within the previous 12 months of the survey, online activity may have been the preferred option due to the pandemic and restrictions. It is just under a year since the major WordCamps returned to some form of in-person events and Meetups having a hybrid of online and in-person. The Training team plans to also use the data from this survey as a benchmark which it will compare against in its future surveys and analyses. 

The analysis of the data combined with other research suggests that many of the respondents may be already familiar with where to go for training on WordPress rather than relying just on search engine results.

What the survey results show is a strong usage of online learning, and this is a major boost for what Learn.WordPress.org can offer and its potential for the future. The additional benefit of this resource is that it has the potential to offer online resources that people, groups, and training facilitators can all share with in-person learning environments. 

Examples of how Learn.WordPress.org can serve the ongoing need for both online and in-person, and group and individual learning, and provide a flexible learning model.

  • Online workshops which can be paused for live discussions and questions and workshops. Note: Discussions groups have been renamed and repurposed as online workshops, with a Q&A and questions opportunity in the video-conferencing area.
  • Lesson Plans: instructors can use or adapt lesson plans for in-person or online classrooms, and as part of courses. Some Lesson Plans include screenshots and examples which can be viewed in a group or individual screen setting.
  • Tutorials: these can be used by individual learners or in group learning. The Training team with the Community, Marketing and Polyglots teams encourage Meetups to use tutorials in-person or online, share the resources for post-event follow-ups, and add interactivity with their group through discussions and questions. There has been about a year to 18 months of this encouragement, and further focus on this may bring in benefits. This is an example of how Learn.WordPress.org is strengthened by cross-collaboration of teams and can add value to both individual and group learning.

Factors in choosing training

A sideways bar graph showing the factors involved in choosing training solutions where cost, time and content delivery were ranked top.

The top three factors in choosing training in general are training time, costs, and content delivery. As for other factors in the customer decision making are location of the training, length of the course, pace of the course, connection with the instructor, quality and relative up-to-date information. 

Some learners may want videos ranging from 3 -5 minutes. This may not be practical for Tutorial videos as topics can take time to introduce and present. However, within courses, a series of 3-5 minutes videos would make sense, though possibly not to stand alone. A learner would advance in the course to the next video to continue the topic. Current Tutorial videos range from 3 to 15 minutes on average.

Opportunities

Training time data does not necessarily imply that videos or segments on the resource should be very short. Ongoing product research and learning the lessons from major providers of training in the market will help Learn.WordPress.org be aware of the trends in people’s preferences for learning. 
It is not possible to say how these stats relate to how long people have been using WordPress. The different journeys discussed in the survey planning would have allowed this to be more useful. This will be incorporated into future research.

This also relates to the shortcomings identified in this survey that content was either too basic or too advanced. This can also be because there is no sequence of the lesson plans and tutorials which would help people find the middle ground. This was supported by the comments in the survey. Comments also focused on not knowing where the start was for a particular area. One of the observations in some follow-up questions during promotion of the survey was that the organizational structure for the available resources is of inconsistent quality in multiple languages presented. 

The organizational structure in some areas can be based on publication date rather than the natural or learning progression through a subject. This potential issue is something that the Training team can explore further.

High priority/ greatest need in training material

Respondents in choosing training materials prioritized: time, costs, content delivery, accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility), and personal learning style. People also referenced the scalability of using WordPress – the basics, blocks, WooCommerce, searchability for training materials, editing pages, and coding. 

Some examples of words associated with learning about WordPress

The general tone of the comments in the shortcoming section was that the current content available is vastly different, overwhelming, and confusing for the users that filled in this survey. To better understand the survey, in the data analysis responses were divided into subcategories: resources, skill level, content, language, learning style, costs, searchability, outdated content, problems, personal and instructor. 

Resources- problems within the available resources. Respondents who completed this section of the survey would like to see different types of resources such as short books, device friendly resources, and clarity of official documents.

Comments on the shortcomings of WordPress training

A note on the data, that the survey specifically requested information on shortcomings of WordPress training in general to help identify any trends or needs where Learn.WordPress.org could add value or prioritze. Questions around the positive usage of materials were not requested in the Individual Learner Survey 2023. Some of this was addressed in the follow-ups accompanying the promotion of the survey and will help identify further questions that could be asked in future parts of the product development research.

Some suggestions for improvement include:

  1. more structured pathways through the learning, including graphical representation
  2. more mobile-friendly
  3. more on new feature/ releases, and tips on the learning steps to take to better understand and use them
  4. signposting and explaining more of concepts and unfamiliar terms to help users learn and understand the framework
  5. avoid using acronyms without giving the full iteration on first use (i.e. do not assume knowledge)
  6. better sequencing and more logical order

The team is planning to focus more on learning pathways and the insight above will add to findings and observations already identified.

Opportunities

Summary of comments received about shortcomings in WordPress learning materials in generalOpportunities for the Training team and/or steps we have already implemented.
A greater distinction in content skill level between beginners, intermediate, and advanced.Online workshops are labelled in this way. Tutorials, Courses and Lesson Plans are not labelled in this way currently.

The team could explore how this could be expanded and look at examples of how the Developer Blog uses such audience labels.
A mix of responses on the need for more content on advanced features, too much beginner content, content not written for students that are far advanced.

Requests for more step-by-step guides and connecting related or necessary linked topics together.

Less jargon and increased signposting of terms mentioned. Helping people understand the WordPress developer vocabulary rather than assuming it is known by learners on the site.
There seems to be a mixed response on the level of topics covered.

The Learning Pathways will help to address much of this.

The Training team could rejoin the cross-team discussions on glossary/ vocabulary in WordPress.

Use language that is easier for those reading who are non-native English speakers/ readers, and avoid truncating words and area-specific expressions.

Encourage more translation of content or create more content in different locales.*
A mix of responses on materials not having enough depth, limited range of topics, limited interactivity, some low quality videos compared to materials available elsewhere.
Video quality will differ as the resource is made for the community by the community.

Discussions on ways to support those making videos are continuing, but there will be some external factors of access to equipment and stable services like internet and electricity have an impact. Ways to support contributors from all parts of the globe would help the team reach more places, and further encourage a focus on diversity and inclusion in its efforts.
The need for more localized content to help learners learn about using WordPress in their preferred languages.* The Training team has made localization a priority and has recently finished the Content Localization Foundations Project. Further areas to explore have been highlighted.
Link to documentation that can explain things in simpler terms for non-developers.Building on the cross-linking between the Training team and Documentation team will help this, and signposting to a non-developer level glossary.

The team can also request content contributors avoid terms that may be unfamiliar to audiences, and to signpost more details when introducing concepts or terms that a learner could be be less familiar with.
TagTag Tag is one of the pre-defined taxonomies in WordPress. Users can add tags to their WordPress posts along with categories. However, while a category may cover a broad range of topics, tags are smaller in scope and focused to specific topics. Think of them as keywords used for topics discussed in a particular post. resources or provide learning pathways to help learners find materials that match their learning style and follow a structured path.

Don’t over-rely on video content as not suited to all learning styles and may be difficult to follow along without having two screens.
The Learning Pathways will help to address much of this. All video tutorials also have a transcript available to aid learners who would prefer a written text to follow.

Most of the Learn.WordPress.org Courses are a mixture of video and/or text.
More hands-on workshops.Many of Learn.WordPress.org Online Workshops try to be more hands-on and/or focused on demos.

The team could explore if there is a need for greater visibility of this offering, and how to highlight the range of hands-on material available through Marketing and Community teams.

There is also an ongoing collaboration on increasing relevant cross-links from or to Learn.WordPress.org to materials in Documentation, CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and software releases.
Complete learning plans.The work on Learning Pathways, linked above, will help provide this.

There is an identified need for increased planning and applying a holistic and structured approach to materials on Learn.WordPress.org. Furthering the efforts on this will help address some of the issues.
Other responses showed users may be expecting all resources to be available in the language they select in the filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. on Learn.WordPress.org. A short clarifying sentence can be added to Learn WordPress near the filter to highlight that not all items in a course may be available in the language chosen by the learner. Adding a call to action button to help make the resource available in the learners’ preferred language may add value too.
Content needs to be able to refer the audience to how to solve the problems.The team could explore whether adding search engine descriptions for ‘how to’ tutorials could help learners.
A way to remind or help learners finish courses.
Some other training providers have mechanisms to send gentle encouraging reminders to learners. The team could draw on and consider such examples. A popular language-learning app, for example, sends out reminders to users to complete their daily goal.
A way of making sure that content before it goes live is reviewed in-depth.



A system for labelling content that does not apply to particular versions of WordPress.
The Training Team does have a process for review in place. Content is shared for review in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, and a review label is used. The team can consider whether more time needs to be given to preparing the structure and content of material, and for review.

The current filtering system on relevance to WordPress software versions may need some information to help users.
Personal time constraints are challenges many adult learners may face.The team could explore how to add an idea of the minimum time needed to complete courses.
Confusion on which training to follow and if it is the same, eg WordPress.comWordPress.com An online implementation of WordPress code that lets you immediately access a new WordPress environment to publish your content. WordPress.com is a private company owned by Automattic that hosts the largest multisite in the world. This is arguably the best place to start blogging if you have never touched WordPress before. https://wordpress.com/ Learn, materials available on the web in general which use the descriptor ‘Learn WordPress’. Continue marketing and elevating Learn.WordPress.org on social media, at WordCamps etc.

Suggestions for other formats suggested by participants

Overwhelming respondents asked for:

  • case studies (44% of responders)
  • lectures (12% of responders)
  • guided courses (8% of responders), and
  • videos (8% of responders).
  • other suggestions included: discussion forums, e-books, infographics, in-person workshops, content on media platforms (small bite-size content), podcasts, office hours, interactive quizzes, sample codes, and downloadable slides. One respondent suggested content from Learn.WordPress.org could be available additionally through external training platforms.

Training Certification 

The question at the end of the survey was: “How interested would you be in the possibility of WordPress training certifications?” Majority of the respondents were interested in a training certification. 

A pie chart of respondents' interest in WordPress training certification where the majority showed interest.

More exploration of this area is underway, and could be the focus of future parts of the Needs Analysis.

Previous posts

Overview of the Individual Learners Survey for the Needs Analysis, January 2023

Individual Leaner Survey update, 2023

Collaboration opportunities

Props to Abha Thakor (@webcommsat) for leading on the analysis and data, Wes Theron (@west7) for co-ordinating the survey work, Nalini Thakor (@nalininonstopnewsuk) for marketing and diversity and inclusion review, Saloni Patel (@Saloni Patel) for initial statistical reporting. To Courtney Robertson (@courane01), Mark- Andrew Nordstrom (@nomadskateboarding), and Amit Patel (@amitpatelmd) for providing peer comments.

Thank you also to Training team members who contributed comments to the development of the questions,
to all those who helped in promoting the survey, and to those who completed it. There will be more opportunities for collaboration in the future.

If you were unable to submit your comments during the survey period or would like to follow-up to help expand content or reach in your locale, do join the Training team meetings on the Make WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. There are lots of ways you can get involved with the efforts of the team and the development of Learn.WordPress.org

#learn-wordpress, #training-needs-analysis

Training Team Meeting Recap for April 11, 2023

This meeting followed this meeting agenda post. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

(We have alternated our weekly team meetings according to the timezone. This week we are having the Team Meeting in the EMEA timezone, and a Coffee Hour was held in the APAC timezone at 7:00 UTC.)

Introductions and Welcome

There are 22 attendees, either live or async: @webtechpooja, @chetan200891, @eboxnet, @jdy68, @mujuonly, @nomadskateboarding, @caraya, @courane01, @afrin29, @boogah, @weblink, @courtneypk, @west7, @onealtr, @chaion07, @faguni22, @lada7042, @amitpatelmd, @bsanevans, @sierratr, @kartiks16, @thisisyeasin,

Welcome to the team (Slack usernames): @Rico@nareshdevineni@Kristin Aus@Nick Kadutskyi @Bradley Mubenga@SWICDEV,@Lycia Diaz

News

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes in this handbook page.

Looking for feedback

Do you have any thoughts on the proposed improvements to the Faculty program? Or perhaps you have additional ideas? Please leave any thoughts you have in the comments section of the post. (NOTE: Feedback is welcome from both Faculty and non-Faculty members) 

Learning pathways are a structured sequence of educational experiences or courses that are designed to help individuals acquire knowledge and skills in a specific field or discipline. @courane01 is working on it. If you have any thoughts, Please do share your thoughts in the comments.

Jamie produces fantastic content for YouTube, and he’s looking for feedback about whether they’d be a good fit for Learn WordPress, too. Please check out the information in the following GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issue, and leave your thoughts as comments there: https://github.com/WordPress/Learn/issues/1439

Looking for volunteers

If you are interested in helping with this, please share your interest in this Slack thread.

  • Discussion: How can we streamline the meeting agenda/recap posts? Reps have two ideas:
    • Agenda in GitHub, recap on the blog
    • Detailed agenda on the blog, and add notable discussions in the comments section.

Please share your thoughts in this Slack thread. Which of the two options do you think is better, and why? Or, do you have other suggestions too?

  • Project Update News

Until last week, at the end of each meeting, we had a section titled “Other projects” where we would ask project leads for an update. However, some projects move slower than others, and we don’t want to burden folks with excess notifications. The last week, we excluded the on-hold projects from the meeting agenda and add them back when they are resumed. You will find a note about these paused projects on the Team’s Administration GitHub board.

Other announcements

Content Published In The Last Week

Open Requests for Review

Project Updates

Other Ways to Contribute

Ready to start contributing? Here are a couple of ways to get involved today!

Open Discussions

A question was raised for step 5 of the subtitle translation and also explained nicely by faculty members. Also Introducing the Advanced Administration handbook was introduced by @webtechpooja


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#learn-wordpress, #meeting-recap, #training, #training-team

Training Team Meeting Recap for April 4, 2023

This meeting followed this meeting agenda post. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

(We have alternated our weekly team meetings according to the timezone. This week we are having the Team Meeting in the APAC timezone, and a Coffee Hour was held in the Americas/EMEA timezone at Tuesday 17:00 UTC.)

1. Introductions and Welcome

There are 21 attendees, either live or async:

@bsanevans, @Chetan200891, @Webtechpooja, @HarjeetSingh, @dhanendran, @sagarladani, @pitamdey, @sumitsingh, @faguni22, @askaryabbas, @piyushmultidots, @digitalchild, @onealtr, @psykro, @vanpariyar, @afrin29, @eboxnet, @lada7042, @nomadskateboarding, @courtneypk, @west7.

Welcome to the team (Slack usernames): @kdevnel ,@Kyle@derventzie@Sardar Monsur,  @Harjeet Singh , @Corina L,  @Fishon AMOS.

2. News

➡️ Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes on this handbook page.

➡️ Streamlining meeting agenda/recap posts

Currently, the team posts very similar content on the meeting agenda and recap posts. Team reps are considering how we can streamline this better.

Here are two ideas we’ve had:

  1. Post an agenda in GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/, and publish a recap as a blog post. (This will reduce the number of posts on the blog, too, potentially making it easier to follow the information that gets published there.).
  2. Publishing a detailed agenda on the blog, and writing notable discussions in the comments of the post.

Regarding the above two options, @webtechpooja, @sumitsingh & @courtneypk voted for option 1(idea 1).

➡️ New team update

Each month, Training Team reps publish an update to the entire WordPress project about the progress the team made in the last month. You can read the most recent update here: What’s new on Learn WordPress in March 2023.

:arrow_right: New handbook pages

Team reps and faculty members are always updating the team handbook to document team processes better. This week, these two new pages were published:

:arrow_right: Proposal: How to run a Learn WordPress course cohort

This new proposal is looking for your feedback by April 7th. Please leave your comments on the post by the end of the week.

:arrow_right: News from other WordPress teams

Last week, a new version of WordPress was released – 6.2 :partying_face:

Has everyone updated their sites to 6.2 already? What is your favorite feature from the new release?

The best part for @webtechpooja & @bsanevans was site editor BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. label removed. @sumitsingh liked the “Meet the reimagined Site Editor” under 6.2  part. @nomadskateboarding mentioned his favourite part as Style Book.

Also noting: Call for volunteers to help with 6.2 end user documentation.

:arrow_right: Announcement: Temporarily relocating on-hold projects from the meeting agenda to GitHub

Until last week, at the end of each meeting, we had a section titled “Other projects” where we would ask project leads for an update. However, some projects move slower than others, and we don’t want to burden folks with excess notifications.

From this week, we will exclude the on-hold projects from the meeting agenda and add them back when they are resumed. You will find a note about these paused projects on the Team’s Administration GitHub board.

:arrow_right: Contributor badges were awarded last week

Last week, @esratpopy and @karthickmurugan were awarded Training Contributor Badges for their contribution to hosting Online Workshops, and translating content on Learn WordPress:training:.

3. Creating content for the WordPress 6.2 release

WordPress 6.2 was released last week, and we have a few more items we’d like to get published. You can find all content labeled 6.2 on our GitHub project board. Here are some items we’re still looking for volunteers for.

:arrow_right: Looking for Content Creators (vetted topics with no assignee) CC: @faculty-content-creators

:arrow_right: Looking for Subject-Matter Experts (topics not yet vetted) CC: @faculty-smes

4. Content published in the last week

We had 4 Tutorials published in the last week. Thank you to everyone who was involved in getting these published!

5. Open requests for review

You can find all content in the review stage in our GitHub project board. Here are a list of items waiting for a review right now.

We’re also looking for translation reviewers for the following content.

6. Project updates

Here are some projects the team is currently working on. Would anyone like to provide an update?

:arrow_right: Content Localization Foundation – @bsanevans

  • Please see March 27th update for a breakdown of content translated so far.
  • We had another Tamil lesson plan published yesterday :tada:

➡️ Individual Learning Survey for the Needs Analysis – @west7

  • An analysis report of the data is scheduled to be published on April 6th – this week! See this recent update for more information.

:arrow_right: Introduction to WordPress Development syllabus – @psykro

  • A syllabus was published last week. Please comment on the post with any comments you have. We’re also looking for folks to help build the content for this syllabus :eyes:

:arrow_right: Gutenberg Rapid Website Recreation Videos – @jamesmarsland

Jamie produces fantastic content for YouTube, and he’s looking for feedback about whether they’d be a good fit for Learn WordPress, too. Please check out the information in the following GitHub issue, and leave your thoughts as comments there :smiley:
https://github.com/WordPress/Learn/issues/1439

Here is an example of Jamie’s videos on YouTube: 

7. Open Discussions

@psykro mentioned,

I just wanted to mention that next week Tuesday is the next scheduled APAC @faculty-dev-squad triage session, and he will be AFK. If anyone else in the APAC dev squad wants to lead that session, please let him know, so that I can arrange the relevant announce permissions for the #meta-learn channel. he also noticed that from what he can see the AMER dev squad has not yet been able to hold a triage session, so he wanted to check in with them and see if there’s anything he can do to assist.

@digitalchild also shared an interest to hold next weeks session.

 8. Other ways to contribute

And as we come to the end of the hour, I wanted to mention a few easier ways folks can contribute to the Training Team.


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#learn-wordpress, #training, #training-team

Proposal: Creating Learning Pathways for Learn WordPress

Learning Pathways for Learn WordPress

Learning pathways are a structured sequence of educational experiences or courses that are designed to help individuals acquire knowledge and skills in a specific field or discipline. By creating a series of learning pathways for WordPress, we can provide learners with a comprehensive understanding of the platform and its open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. contribution methods. There are many benefits to using learning pathways to create curriculum, including:

  • Increased Engagement: Learning pathways provide a clear roadmap for learners, which can help to keep them engaged and motivated throughout the learning process.
  • Personalization: Learning pathways can be customized to meet the individual needs and interests of learners, which can help to make the learning experience more effective and relevant. (as suggested for future development in Learn WordPress Needs Assessment Results)
  • Better Outcomes: By providing learners with a structured and comprehensive learning experience, we can help them to achieve their learning goals more efficiently and effectively.
  • Better Collaboration: Learning pathways can encourage collaboration and knowledge sharing among learners, promoting teamwork and problem-solving skills.
  • Improved Retention: Learning pathways can help learners retain information better by breaking down complex topics into smaller, manageable sections, making it easier for them to remember what they’ve learned.
  • Unifying Strategy:  By unifying a learner-based strategy around curated content will make Learn.WordPress.org more sustainable and reduce maintenance overload. It will also help enhance and provide additional needed resources for WordPress users, rather than duplicating the efforts of others, including the Documentation team and the Dev CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. Blog.

To implement this proposal, we suggest that the WordPress community work together to develop a series of learning pathways for WordPress. These learning pathways could cover topics such as WordPress basics, theme and pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party development, and ways to contribute to the WordPress open source project. We will 

  1. Establish our baseline audiences 
  2. Charter and create their Beginner ➡️ Expert learning journeys. 

Example: As a Beginner-level WordPress Frontend Developer, what is the content you need to master to move on to Intermediate competency? What is the content you need to master to move on to Expert competency and so on? If we can break down each audience and outline the core competencies for each level we focus our content creation around that and build out their pathways.

The WordPress Training Team will seek opportunities to collaborate with hiring managers in the WordPress ecosystem, independent freelancers and contractors, as well as educational institutions and other organizations to develop and promote these learning pathways. Next steps might include partnering with educational institutions to that offer WordPress courses or collaborating with industry organizations to create certification programs

By embracing learning pathways, we can help to create a more structured and effective learning experience for individuals who want to learn about WordPress. We believe that this will benefit both learners and the WordPress community as a whole.

Our first learning pathway for consideration is Introduction to WordPress Development: A proposed learning path

This post will remain open until May 1.

Initial reviews by @bsanevans @west7 @webcommsat

#learn-wordpress

Training Team Meeting Recap for March 14, 2023

This meeting followed this meeting agenda post. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

(We have alternated our weekly team meetings according to the timezone. This week we are having the Team Meeting in the APAC timezone, and a Coffee Hour was held in the Americas/EMEA timezone at Tuesday 17:00 UTC.)

Introductions and Welcome

There are 17 attendees, either live or async: @webtechpooja@courane01 @faguni22@nomadskateboarding@mehrazmorshed, @eboxnet, @thisisyeasin, @lada7042, @ibalmarwan, @chetan200891, @caraya, @courtneypk, @westn, @dhanendran, @onealtr, @azhiyadev, & @bsanevans.

Welcome to the team (Slack usernames): @Freeom@mujuonly @Muhammed Iqbal P B@Mehraz Morshed @Mateusz@Lyndi Castrejon

News

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes on this handbook page.

  • March 14 – @Mumtahina Faguni
  • March 21 – need volunteer
  • March 29 – need volunteer

Faculty Members Update

  • We are considering discontinuing async meetings. Please leave your comments on this Slack discussion. (Note: This link will take you away from this meeting flow.)
  • Daylight Savings Time ends on March 12 for AMER and March 26th for EMEA. And according to the poll, we will run the meeting at 16:00 UTC. We will change the time from the next meeting i.e. March 21. 
  • Would anyone like to co-host the upcoming EMEA/AMER meeting on March 28 with me? Please leave your name in the comments if you want to volunteer.

Dev-squad update: Triage sessions planning

This post summarises the discussions that followed the dev-squad proposal.
The dev-squad triage sessions would alternate weekly:

  1. APAC dev-squad sessions will be held on Tuesdays at 06:00 UTC
  2. AMER dev-squad sessions will be held on Tuesdays at 22:00 UTC

The first dev-squad sessions were held in the APAC timezone today at 6:00 UTC.

We managed to review 5 Pull requests and assign labels according to their status. Our Faculty-member, @bsanevans, also added:

I’m really excited to see this kick off, and to see the progress the squad was able to make in just 30 minutes

@bsanevans

Introduction to WordPress Development: A proposed learning path

Please provide your feedback on the proposed learning path. Here I would like to mention @Courtney also shared a draft for learning pathways, just before the meeting started. Here is the link 👇

https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C02RW657Q/p1678805300219399 (Please note this link will take you away from this meeting flow.)

Launching the Contributor Working Group: Call for Volunteers

This post aims to start building the proposed mentorship program using the contributor working group! If you would like to contribute or be a part of this, comment on the post.

Start working on revising and creating content for WP 6.2 on LearnWP

Projects

Other Work in Progress

The following items are other projects that team members have volunteered to take on. Would any of the project owners like to provide the team with an update?

@courane01 also stated that,

No updates yet, I have drafts in progress and will start sharing those when I have them a bit more finalized. With the release underway, expect a slew of updates a few days after the release.

Request for review

Tutorial

Lesson Plan

Course

Other ways to Contribute

➡️ Co-host an upcoming Online Workshop
Learn more about Co-hosting an Online Workshop on our handbook page.
➡️ Help resolve a Content Error
We have information on how to validate and Triaging Content Error Reports.
➡️
Join the Training Team Welcome Committee!
Help us welcome new members to the Training Team and foster our growing community.

Online Workshop this Week

Open Discussion

@psykro mentioned confusion around the process of applying for team badges. @webtechpooja mentioned the team was in the process of updating handbook pages. The GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issue in use right now will be closed once those updates have been published.


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#learn-wordpress, #training, #training-team

Training Team Meeting Recap for March 7, 2023

This meeting followed this meeting agenda post. You can see conversations from the meeting in this Slack Log. (If you don’t have a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, you can set one up.)

(We have alternated our weekly team meetings according to the timezone. This week we are having the Team Meeting in the APAC timezone, and a Coffee Hour was held in the Americas/EMEA timezone at Tuesday 17:00 UTC.)

Introductions and Welcome

There are 16 attendees, either live or async: @webtechpooja, @digitalchild, @karthickmurugan, @bhargavbhandari90, @amitpatelmd, @afrin29, @nomadskateboarding, @chetan200891, @faguni22, @onealtr, @psykro, @lada7042, @eboxnet, @courane01, @courtneypk, @bsanevans

Welcome to the team (Slack usernames): @shilpa @Caleb Matteis @John@Shipon Karmakar

News

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team, and you can find details on how to write notes on this handbook page.

  • March 7 – @Afrin
  • March 14 – @faguni22
  • March 21 – need volunteer
  • March 29 – need volunteer

Faculty Members Update

Training Team goals

Training Team goals for 2023 have been published. Please check out the team goals for this year. This will help us prioritize different tasks throughout the year.

Meeting Time Update

Daylight Savings Time ends on March 12th at 10:00 UTC and the UK and other parts of Europe change after March 26th. We created a poll for collecting votes and below result we got:

Training Team Meeting Time Update for Daylight Savings Time ends on March 12th at 10:00 UTC, and the UK and other parts of Europe change after March 26th. We created a poll for collecting votes and Showcased the result we got through this image.

Learn Newsletter

The first Learn WordPress Newsletter was published. Please share this in your networks.

Come & Join The Renewed Welcome Committee

With the launch of the new onboarding program, the Welcome Wrangler role has evolved. Come check out the revamped role, and join the committee!

Process To Contribute To Learn WordPress

Add your thoughts to this Slack discussion. As to whether we should consistently stick to “Learn” or “Learn WordPress”, or whether both could be used interchangeably, we would be interested to hear the thoughts from the team. 

Team RepTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts. Update

Destiny will be away from March 1 – June 1 for a sabbatical. Please continue to lean on @bsanevans and @webtechpooja during this time.

Online Workshops Update

A discussion has started to include Online Workshops in the WordPress admin dashboard widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user.:: Proposal: Modify the Events and News widget to show topic-based meetups worldwide

Recap: Sensei Pro LMS Demo for Learn WordPress 

Sensei Pro LMS Demo for Learn WordPress – Thanks @Courtney and @Ronnie Burt for the insight.
Here are the discussion points:

  • Chapter 1: Navigating Learn WordPress Courses
  • Chapter 2: Enhancing the Learning Experience with Interactive Blocks and Videos
  • Chapter 3: Making Use of Video
  • Chapter 4: Navigating Sensei Settings
  • Chapter 5: Improving the Course Experience

Published Content 

WordPress 6.2 release Work:

Start working on revising and creating content for WP 6.2 on LearnWP WordPress 6.2 Beta 1 launched on Feb 7and you can check Recap: WordPress 6.2 Beta 4 Release Party Ride Along

We are looking for folks to create content related to the WordPress 6.2 release. You can find content needing creation on this GitHub project board. Here are other useful links:

Projects

Content Localization Foundation

Content Localization Foundation – @bsanevans is now leading the project.

– Project completion is scheduled for March 31st – less than a month to go!

Learning Survey Update

Individual Learning Survey for the Needs Analysis which is now closed. @abhanonstopnewsuk and @Saloni Patel shared their thoughts on analyzing this survey data by 20 March (CC: project leader: @westnz).

Other Work In Progress

The following items are other projects that team members have volunteered to take on. 

Request For Review

Forthcoming Online Workshops

Online Workshop this Week:

Other Ways To Contribute

Ready to start contributing? Here are a couple of ways to get involved today!

Open Discussions

@webtechpooja started the discussion by sharing one of her celebrations’ news Holi – Festival of Colors. Also, @karthickmurugan asked about “6 of my lesson plans and handbook pages Tamil translations are waiting for a reviewer. If we find a Tamil Reviewer for reviewing those, it would be great.” Proper discussion with solutions had been provided.


You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#learn-wordpress, #training, #training-team

Meeting Agenda for March 7th, 2023

This week’s meeting will be held in the APAC timezone on Tuesday, March 7th 2023 at 07:00 UTC with @bsanevans and @webtechpooja hosting.

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. Meeting Note Takers
      • March 7 – @afrin29
      • March 14 – need volunteer
      • March 21 – need volunteer
      • March 28 – need volunteer
    2. Faculty Members Update
    3. Training Team goals for 2023 have been published
    4. WordPress 6.2 Release
    5. Daylight Savings Time ends on March 12 for AMER and March 26th for EMEA — please vote on what to do.
    6. The first Learn WordPress Newsletter was published: Learn WordPress March Newsletter
    7. With the launch of the new onboarding program, the Welcome Wrangler role has evolved. Come and join the renewed Welcome Committee!
    8. How shall we refer to the site https://learn.wordpress.org? Add your thoughts to this Slack discussion.
    9. Team RepTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts. Destiny will be away from March 1 – June 1 for a sabbatical.
    10. A discussion has started to include Online Workshops in the WordPress admin dashboard widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user.Proposal: Modify the Events and News widget to show topic-based meetups worldwide
  3. Published Content
    • Tutorial
    • Lesson Plan
    • Course
  4. Start working on revising and creating content for  WP 6.2 on LearnWP – WordPress 6.2 Beta 1 launched on Feb 7
  5. Projects
  6. Other Work in Progress
  7. Request for review
  8. Open Discussions

You can see all meetings scheduled on this meeting calendar. If you are new to the Training Team, then come walk through our onboarding program to get to know the team and how we work. And if you have questions, feel free to reach out in the #training Slack channel at any time.

#agenda, #learn-wordpress, #training-team