Lesson Plans to Workshops: A Mini-Sprint

The training team has created some incredible work over the years, but none so prominent and detailed as the glorious archive of Lesson Plans.

They have actionable objectives.
They have clear steps.
They’re already detailed, vetted, and ready to roll for public use.

Ultimately, they are an excellent resource for potential video workshops!

This is a little late in the month to add to the sprint, but this is something that I’d love to see happen sooner rather than later, so I wanted to bring this idea into the public space!

While I’m wrapping up my first text-based course, there are a few lesson plans I’ve been spying that might make excellent supplementary video workshop material (such as @courane01‘s suggestion of using Demo Content) .

If this works well, we might consider how we will communicate who is working on turning a lesson plan into a workshop going forward (perhaps with a new column in the TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. board?)

I’d like to see if we can more quickly produce a few workshops from existing lesson plans in a sort of mini-sprint in this in-between time as some of our new training team members are onboarding. Going forward, these will be included in our monthly sprints.

If interested this next week, please pick a lesson plan that you want to “claim” or are interested in creating a video workshop for in the comments.

We can also clarify this process once we’ve seen how it goes!

Should Learn WordPress contributors be GPL compliant?

In some cases – notably for anyone involved in a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. in any official capacity – WordPress contributors are required to be GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples. compliant. This means that any WordPress derivatives (i.e. themes, plugins, forks or distributions) that they distribute must be licensed under the GPL or a compatible licence. This isn’t the case for most areas of contribution, so let’s have a look at whether this should apply to contributors to learn WordPress.

The result of this conversation may seem obvious to some, but it’s good to discuss these things out in the open so that we have a documented record of where, why, and how these types of decisions have been made.

First, some precedents

In terms of contributions, Learn WordPress is an interesting blend of speaking and documenting depending on the area of contribution on the platform, so here are some precedents in both of those areas that we should be aware of:

Event speakers

Anyone who speaks at an official WordPress event (WordCamp, meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area., etc.) is only allowed to speak if any WordPress derivatives they distribute are licensed with a GPL compatible licence. This has always been the case, and for good reason. Speakers (and organisers) are seen to represent WordPress to their local community, so they need to embody the same freedoms that the GPL affords WordPress users.

Documentation contributors

Anyone can contribute documentation to WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/the Docs team handbook doesn’t have any specific requirements listed and allows anyone to get involved. Since documentation writers aren’t specifically representing WordPress in the same way that event speakers, this is not an issue. Also, documentation contributors aren’t directly recognised for their specific contributions in the context of where it took place.

Core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org.

Since CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. is the oldest area of contribution in the project it’s also worth taking a look at how contributors can get involved and are recognised here. Anyone can contribute to WordPress core, regardless of their GPL compliance. All contributors receive props for their contribution directly on TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/., as well as being thanked in the announcement post on WordPress.org/news. Their name in the announcement post is linked to their WordPress.org profile.

OK, so what does that mean for Learn WordPress?

Lesson plans

Lesson plan contributors do not have any GPL requirements – this is much the same as for documentation in that anyone can contribute and specific contributors are not recognised directly on the lesson plans themselves. This seems right to me and is the best way to encourage as many people as possible to contribute.

Workshops

Currently, all workshop presenters are credited on the workshop page with their name, avatarAvatar An avatar is an image or illustration that specifically refers to a character that represents an online user. It’s usually a square box that appears next to the user’s name. and full bio pulled from their WordPress.org profile (example). Since workshop presenters are a public face of the project in much the same way that WordCamp speakers are, we have also been operating under the same requirements as WordCamp speakers when it comes to being GPL compatible. This also seems right to me and I am of the opinions that we should continue with this requirement.

It is possible, however, for people to contribute content to a video workshop without being the presenter on the screen. This raises some questions:

  1. Do we credit non-presenting content contributors in the same way as presenters?
  2. Should non-presenting contributors have the same GPL compatibility requirements as presenters?

Since one of the primary motivations behind the GPL requirement is to ensure that anyone publicly representing WordPress does so in a way that is faithful to the licence, it makes sense for presenters to have that same requirement, but I don’t think we can say the same for non-presenting contributors.

A proposal

After considering a few ways we could move forward here, my proposal is the following:

  • Anyone contributing text-based content to Learn WordPress does not have to fulfil any GPL compliance requirements, this would apply to lesson plans and any other area that is text/image based.
  • Workshop presenters (i.e. people who appear in videos whether on video or audio) must continue to be GPL compliant just like WordCamp speakers need to be – presenters will be vetted at the time of their workshop application just like WordCamp speakers are vetted.
  • Anyone contributing to workshops who is not appearing in the video itself (i.e. helped to create the outline, script, slides, editing, or any other area) does not need to be GPL compliant.
  • Workshop presenters will still be listed on the workshop page with their name, avatar and bio as they are now, while anyone contributing to the workshop in any other capacity would be listed in a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. titled “Other contributors” with their name that is linked to their WordPress.org profile, just like in the core release announcements.

tl;dr: Anyone featuring in videos must be GPL compliant, but all other contributors need not be.

Feedback

Does this proposal sound like a good way to move forward? Please share any thoughts you have and we can discuss it all here.

This post will remain open for comments until the end of the day on Wednesday, 29 September. After that, comments will be summarised and we can formalise the guidelines based on this discussion

Proposal: Brand guidelines for Learn WordPress content

Shortly after Learn WordPress launched in late 2020, the decision was made to remove any content that mentioned any brand other than WordPress itself until guidelines could be established to indicate what kinds of brands could be mentioned, and how they can be presented. This was an understandable, and intentionally temporary, move to ensure that the platform remained balanced and unbiased towards any particular product or company.

As Learn WordPress is growing, this is a good time to revisit that decision and work on some guidelines that will help the team make wise decisions about brands being included in training content.

Goals

The purpose of creating brand guidelines here is threefold:

  • Learn WordPress needs to be home to high-quality learning materials that serve the needs of all WordPress users – from beginners to power users – without being home to commercial interests.
  • While the platform is not responsible for the success or failure of any particular business providing services to the WordPress community, it would be great if it could create a fertile environment for pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party/theme developers, hosting providers and others to actualize their own goals and make a living while contributing to the community.
  • Guidelines need to consider the WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ teams and volunteers involved. These contributors who make sure that everything runs smoothly deserve impactful tasks and appropriate credit. 

Proposal

Keeping the above mentioned goals in mind, here is a proposal for guidelines that can be implemented to remain in line with similar guidelines on other contributor teams. See the ‘References’ section below for more from other teams.

Brands can be included in Learn WordPress content if:

  • They are relevant to the piece of content in question.
  • They respect the WordPress trademark and don’t misuse it in any way.
  • They embrace the WordPress licence. Meaning that any WordPress derivatives (plugins, themes, or distributions) they distribute must be licenced under the General Public Licence (GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples.).

Additionally, plugins and themes can only be included if there is a version of their product that is hosted in the WordPress.org Plugin/Theme Directory – this will not only ensure compliance with the licence and trademark guidelines, but it will ensure that any plugins/themes mentioned in the content will be freely and readily available for learners directly in their WordPress dashboard.

When brands are mentioned in training content:

  • At least 2-3 options of different brands that provide a similar product/service must be mentioned wherever possible and reasonable to do so. This is in order to keep the content aligned with the purpose of helping people learn how to use WordPress, rather than how to use a particular plugin/theme/service.
  • For practical reasons, in some cases it may be appropriate to have a workshop that is focused on a single plugin. In those instances, the content must be clear about the purpose (“How to use Plugin X”) and can only cover plugins/themes that are hosted in the WordPress.org Plugin/Theme Directory – no upsells or highlighting premium features available elsewhere should be included.
  • A disclaimer must be added to the content (or possibly in the global site footer) that any brand/product/service mentioned is considered a suggestion and not an endorsement.
  • Content must be reviewed and updated if there are any previously mentioned brands that no longer adhere to the trademark/licence requirements above (for example, if they change their licencing or use of the WordPress trademark). A feature for tracking this can be a part of the proposed audit tool.

Regarding the promotion of your own company/brand:

  • Company/brand logos should not appear in videos as far as possible – visuals must aim to be product-neutral and unbranded.
  • You may not highlight your business or otherwise advertise your own products/services as part of any content on Learn WordPress – this includes individuals who create training content professionally. All videos are accompanied by bios of all speakers, so credit will always be given appropriately to the individuals creating the content.
  • The only time where you may highlight your own product when producing content for Learn WordPress is if it is relevant and contextual. For example, if someone who works for Easy Digital Downloads is creating content about using eCommerce in WordPress, then including Easy Digital Downloads as an option alongside other eCommerce plugins would be reasonable so long as it is done according to the guidelines above.

Feedback

Your thoughts on this proposal along the following lines would be greatly appreciated:

  1. Do you think the proposed guidelines are a reasonable way to meet the goals outlined above while remaining in keeping with similar guidelines elsewhere in the community?
  2. Is there anything you would add/change/remove from the guidelines proposed?

Please provide feedback in the comments section. This proposal will be finalised on Thursday, 26 August and will then be implemented for all content hosted on Learn WordPress now and in the future.

References

In order to help establish the above proposal, the following similar guidelines from other contributor teams were examined.

From the WordPress.tv Submission Guidelines:

WordPress TV is a moderated community and the videos we publish are for the benefit of all users of WordPress. As such, our content is meant to be a reflection of the values of the WordPress project; therefore, videos published to WordPress.tv must:

– respect the WordPress trademark,

– embrace the WordPress license,

– only promote WordPress-derivative works (themes, plugins, and other distros) that are suitable for promotion at wordpress.org,

– and be free of spam, incitement to violence, and discrimination of any kind.

From the guidelines for speakers at WordCamps:

WordCamps are official events. Most attendees see you, a bonafide WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. speaker, as someone who represents WordPress. In your presentation, you’ll want to make sure you only recommend WordPress products or companies that honor the WordPress trademark and embrace the WordPress license.

From the Support Forum Guidelines:

For support of commercial themes or plugins, go to the official support channel.

In order to be good stewards of the WordPress community, and encourage innovation and progress, we feel it’s important to direct people to those official locations. Doing this will provide the developer with the income they need to make WordPress awesome.

Ultimately, the vendors are responsible for supporting their commercial product.

Thanks to the following people for their input on this proposal: @courane01, @nao, @angelasjin, @harishanker & @dansoschin .

August 2021 Training Team Sprint

The Training team is using the Sprint method to determine what we are working on and to determine our timeframe for delivery.

What is a Sprint?

Sprints are fixed length events of one month or less to create consistency. A new Sprint starts immediately after the conclusion of the previous Sprint.

https://www.scrum.org/resources/what-is-a-sprint-in-scrum

Sprint Goals

Theme: How to contribute to the WordPress Project with screenshots and videos (guidelines for how content within screenshots and videos appear).

Think about these with as much consideration toward accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) as possible.

Ideally, these guidelines could be adopted by other teams as well, turned into a video series of workshops, and help onboard others into several parts of the project. Additionally, it lifts needing to maintain this from our team handbook into content on Learn.

Learn Content

Lesson Plans

We currently using TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. to manage and keep track of the status of each Lesson Plan. Every Lesson Plan has its own Trello card. The Trello lists represent our Development Workflow, each list contains a card that explains how to use that list.

Lesson Plan and Workshop Ideas

For the cards in this list:

  • Finalize description
  • Set objectives (goals)
  • Research and add links to support and developer docs
  • Identify marketing communications
  • Carry out an SEO review.
  • Review related material on Learn
  1. Trial run on a lesson plan and workshop about overcoming Imposter Syndrome by @lepittenger as part of Web Dev Studios 5FTF to be included in the speaker series

Next Up – You Can Help!

  1. Site Backup
  2. Migrate, Copy, or Clone a Site
  3. Introduction to Gutenberg
  4. How to Configure WordPress Installation for Contributor and Developer Testing @woodnet @caseymilne @paaljaochim
  5. Testing a Trac ticket or GitHub PR @woodnet @caseymilne @paaljaochim

Drafts in Progress

  1. How to create a blog post in WordPress 5.x @geheren

Instructional Review

  1. Using a browser inspector@woodnet – revising screenshots

Copyediting in Progress

Annotation options@cousett merged with Zooming in, how to crop for enough focus and context, aspect ratios@courane01

Style Guide Review

  1. What to do when you forget your password@webtechpooja

Ready for Final Review

  1. When to use browser dev tools inspector to override some information (hiding your name) @cousett
  2. Sample content – Theme Unit Test Data, Gutenberg Blocks Data, Monster Widget @cousett

Audit

  1. What to do when you forget your password @webtechpooja

Workshops

  1. Coming Soon

Learn Functionality

  1. Continue Slides pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party proposal after Learn Working Group consideration
  2. Style a print-friendly style sheet (transcripts and lesson plans)
  3. Use a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. layout in a page to create much of the lesson plan page organization https://github.com/WordPress/learn/issues/153
  4. Coordinate about audit tool feature request with #docs, #marketing, and other relevant teams
  5. Consider partnering with Five for the Future contributors for Learn functionality.

Training Team

  1. Publish initial draft for Brand guidelines, seeking specific feedback. (awaiting further input with #Marketing)
  2. Audit Learn Functionalitly Trello board
  3. Deputy program
  4. Update Training Team and Learn Handbook
  5. Schedule Learn Stakeholder meeting
  6. Conduct a retrospective on the previous sprint.
  7. Complete the revision of the Handbook
  8. Begin the Deputy program for vetting content on Learn within Training
  9. Consolidate the roadmaps to learning WordPress with the languages as well.

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.

Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects. Here’s what you need to know to get started.

Team Links

  1. Getting involved:- https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/getting-started/
  2. About The Team:- https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/about/ 
  3. Our Team Blog:- https://make.wordpress.org/training/ 
  4. Our Content Roadmap:- https://trello.com/b/BsfzszRM/wordpress-training-team-lesson-plan-development 
  5. Learn WordPress Roadmap:- https://trello.com/b/rK1tztAA/learn-wordpress 
  6. Our Lesson Plans:- https://learn.wordpress.org/lesson-plans/
  7. Our YouTube Channel:- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnxqNA0WORZXWurEP6cNV6w 
  8. Learn Website:- https://learn.wordpress.org/

#learn-wordpress, #learnwp, #sprint, #training-team

Workshop Captioning and Transcription Sprint

Of the 53 workshops that currently live on Learn WordPress, 29 of them have captions and only 3 have full transcripts. Let’s fix that!

What are we doing?

We are going to hold a dedicated sprint for volunteers to join the Training Team in generating and uploading captions and transcripts for all 53 workshops.

When are we doing it?

The sprint will be held on Friday, 20 August at the following two times:

Each sprint will be 1-2 hours long (although it can go on as long as people are available) and volunteers can join for some or all of it.

Where are we doing it?

The sprint will be coordinated in the #training channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. All you need to do is show up in the channel at the right time.

How are we doing it?

We’ll be using two different services to generate captions and transcripts – Otter.ai for English videos and Sonix.ai for all other languages. This comprehensive guide walks you through the entire process so you don’t need any prior knowledge about how video captions or transcripts work. You will find a sheet with the caption/transcript status of all the published videos here.

Why are we doing it?

Captions and transcripts serve three main purposes for the workshop videos.

  1. AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) – captions and transcripts allow anyone to be able to read what is being presented thereby making the videos available to more people.
  2. Localisation – captions and transcripts, unlike the videos themselves, can be localised. Since all of the workshop videos are hosted on WordPress.tv, once captions have been added any Polyglots contributor can translate and upload them in any other language.
  3. SEO – the text in the captions and transcripts can be indexed by search engines, making the content significantly more findable across the web.

If you would like to get involved in this work outside of the hours designated for this sprint, then you are welcome (and encouraged!) to do so. Please follow the guide for instructions and let the team know in the #training channel that you’re doing it.

Once this work has concluded and all of the current videos have full captions and transcriptions, this will become a requirement for any new video published on Learn WordPress so we will never host a workshop without them again.

#learn-wordpress

Agenda for August 17, 2021

Please join us Tuesday 1600 UTC OR Office Hour Friday 1000 UTC in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. APAC Meeting starts next week
    1. Badges for courses
    2. Brand Guidelines proposal
    3. WCUS speaker application
    4. Captioning working session
    5. Translation Days
    6. Micro Courses proposal
    7. Coffee Hour & Work Day
      1. Coffee hour hangout Friday 9EDT/1PM UTC Zoom in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.
      2. Learn Workshop transcription working session
        1. Thursday, August 19, 2021, 09:00 PM EDT with @hlashbrooke managing the sprint.
        2. Friday, August 20, 2021, 10:00 AM EDT with @courane01 managing the sprint.
  3. Sprint
    1. August progress
      1. What did you commit to last week?
      2. What did you do?
      3. Any blockers?
      4. What will you do next week?
    2. September Sprint Planning suggestions
  4. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings


You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.

Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Invovled

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

Team Links:

WordPress 101: Microcourses Proposal

To further develop Learn for everyone, there are a few problems I’d like to see the training team solve through structured Microcourses. These microcourses will be “choose your own adventure” style. Before enrolling in a microcourse, learners will be prompted to assess their own existing knowledge and use their own interest to guide their course choices. 

Microcourses will be:

  • Largely text-and-image based (with a few short videos thrown in for variety) for accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility)
  • Bite-sized; every lesson (currently known as a “workshop”) should be able to be completed quickly, within 5-10 minutes
  • Self-paced; unlike with longer videos, Learners can set down this learning and pick it back up as their schedule allows.
  • Leveled based on pre-existing knowledge (101/102? We would need to name each level and provide guidance on what someone would be expected to know at each level.)
  • Interactive; each course will prompt users to do something with their knowledge.

This benefits all learners because it creates…

  1. A shorter period of ramp-up time for the basics (from 4.5 hours to 1 hour or less for the basic WordPress 101 course, preferably)
  2. Personalized learning experiences based on need & interest
  3. Self-Paced learning with deliberate scaffolds in place for neurodiverse learners

Eventually, I would love for each course to be recommended based on how people answer certain questions. For now, however, each microcourse page will include “suggested prerequisites” — in other words, skills and knowledge people will need to have in order to best work through a new microcourse. 


Here is a potential structure for a Basic WordPress 101 Microcourse:

Setting Up WordPress

Prerequisites: None!

Take this course if…

  • You are getting started for the first time with WordPress;
  • You haven’t decided on a host yet;
  • You haven’t picked a domain name yet;
  • You haven’t set up WordPress in any way yet.

By the end of this unit, you will be able to… (Quiz questions will be based on these statements–you’ll notice these are very action-based)

  • Describe difference between a host and a domain name
  • Determine which kind of hosting may be best for your website development needs
  • Set up WordPress on a host or on a server of your own
  • Navigate WordPress’ unique dashboard

    Do you know this information already? Take the quiz and earn a badge!

Modules within a Microcourse: Modules/lessons would explore those objectives bit by bit in a fraction of the existing course time. Structured, carefully crafted formative assessments would exist throughout the course (partially to give us feedback on our own instruction). This would ultimately culminate in a summative assessment (quiz for now, complete with action tasks) at the end of the course.


Course Complete!

When someone completes a microcourse, it would be useful to provide suggestions for the next most useful microcourses they might take depending on their goals. 

For example, on a “Course Complete!” page, learners might see something like this:

Congratulations! You’ve finished the course, “Setting Up WordPress”. To decide what you’d like to learn next, let’s find out: Which of these is closest to your goal?

  1. Design a WordPress website with pages that does not have a blog.
  2. Design a WordPress website with pages that also has a blog.
  3. Set up a WordPress blog–no need for additional pages.
  4. Something more advanced (eCommerce website, etc.)

Potential Personalization: Depending on functionality, ideally, each of these options might take learners to a slightly different grouping of microcourses . 

For example, a single lesson for setting up a blog page wouldn’t be toggled on for a course if someone didn’t want a blog on their website. 


To find the proposed course outline (tentative), please click here to be taken to the public GoogleDoc. You are welcome to comment upon that document as well. I would like to begin work on this by Monday, the 16th of August.

Thoughts? Questions? Comments? Is there a topic I am missing from the original course outline? 

Drop your ideas in the comments! 

#course-outline, #microcourses, #new-course, #training

Scheduling an APAC-Friendly Meeting Time

As the Training Team has grown over the years, more contributors are joining from all over the world. This is super exciting to see! In order to accommodate contributors in as many timezones as possible, we’re going to need to set up dual meeting times in the same way that both the Polyglots and Community teams do. This means that the weekly Training Team meeting will be held twice, both times with the same agenda, in order to cater to different time zones.

The current team meeting is weekly on Tuesday at 4pm UTC. This generally works for people in the US and through most EMEA timezones, but it makes it pretty tough for people in APAC to attend, so let’s figure out a time that will allow more people to get involved in the Training Team!

If the current Training Team meeting time is impossible or difficult for you, then please use this poll to vote for times that could work for you (you may select as many options as applicable): https://poll.fm/10895749

Meeting Agenda for August 10, 2021

Please join us Tuesday 1600 UTC OR Office Hour Friday 1000 UTC in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. Survey
    2. Who can Learn help?
    3. Badges for courses
    4. WCUS coming up
    5. Translation Days
    6. Coffee Hour & Work Day Friday
  3. Additional Training Team community ideas
    1. Office hour before/after team meeting
    2. APAC Meeting
    3. Regular meetings for specific areas of focus
      1. Subject matter experts/advisors
      2. Lesson plan creators
      3. Instructional designers
      4. Workshop creators
  4. Sprint
    1. August progress
  5. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings


You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.

Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Invovled

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

Team Links:

Learn WordPress: User Survey & Focus Groups

Learn WordPress has been live since December 2020 and, in that time, the platform has seen solid growth in content and collaborative learning. While there are many plans in place for where the platform is intended to grow, a more structured roadmap needs to be established so that things can move forward with a clear direction in mind.

In order to facilitate this, a thorough analysis and needs assessment of Learn WordPress is underway. This assessment has a few different facets to it, one of which is direct research into what learners and potential learners would like to see, both in terms of content and the learning experience as a whole. In order to gather reliable data with which to work, a survey has been compiled and focus groups will be run. These will help answer questions about what kind of things people want to learn about and how they want to learn.

The survey is anonymous and open for anyone to complete – it will only take a few minutes to go through. You can find it here and fill it out right now: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LearnWordPress. The survey will be open until Friday, 13 August.

The focus groups will be video calls that last for about 1 hour and will include 5-6 people in each one. There will only be a small number of focus groups and people who join them will have no further obligations beyond attending and taking part in the call. You can complete this form to register your interest in being a part of one: https://forms.gle/jdk2qkkvGyszx1SG6. Focus groups will ideally take place during the week of 2-6 August but can be postponed to the following week depending on interest and availability.

These efforts will be the most successful if people with a broad range of skill sets and experience levels take part, so please share the links above (or just this post!) with as many people as possible. The results will be valuable no matter how well people know WordPress – whether they’re interested in using it for the first time, have just started using it, or have been using it for a long time already.


The results of the survey will be published on this blog, along with relevant anonymised data gleaned from the focus groups.

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