Meeting Agenda for May 10 – 12, 2022

Please join us for our Team Meeting Tuesdays at 16:00 UTC OR Thursdays at 11:30 UTC (APAC friendly) OR Coffee Hour Friday at 13:00 UTC in the #training Slack channel for our weekly meetings!


This Week’s Agenda

  1. Intro/Welcome
  2. News
    1. Meeting Note Takers
      1. May 10 – @kemmy99
      2. May 17 – @arasae
      3. May 24 – @artdecotech
      4. May 31 – @artdecotech
    2. The Training Team Faculty Program is now live
    3. WCEU Contributor Day
  3. Monthly Sprint
    1. Progress
      1. Drafts
      2. Reviews
      3. Published
    2. Help Needed
      1. Content
        1. Ready to Create – You Can Help
          1. High Priority
          2. Medium Priority
          3. Quick Fix
        2. Topic Ideas
      2. Website Development
        1. High Priority Issues
        2. Medium Priority Issues
        3. Good First Issues
      3. Training Team Administration
  4. Open Discussions

Upcoming Meetings

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.


Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

  1. Learn.WordPress.org
    1. Lesson Plans
    2. Workshops
    3. Courses
    4. Social Learning Spaces
    5. Pathways to Learn WordPress
  2. Getting Involved
    1. GitHub Website Development
    2. GitHub Content Development
    3. What We Are Currently Working On This Month
  3. About The Team
  4. Our Team Blog

Recap of Training Team meeting May 3 & 5

Slack Log for EMEA/Americas Meeting (Tuesday, May 3, 2022)
Slack Log for APAC Meeting (Thursday, May 5, 2022)

(Logs require a SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account.)

The agenda for both meetings can be found here.

Introductions and Welcome

Attendance EMEA/Americas Meeting: @courane01, @piyopiyofox, @ndiego, @arasae, @kemmy99, @caraya, and @artdecotech

Attendance APAC Meeting: @courane01, @west7, @abax14, @psykro

Welcoming the newcomers joining the Training team in the last week (Slack usernames): @Alexander Puhl, @Gregory Hernandez@Nirav Sherasiya@Dhaval250@Heather Roy, @Aissé, @kare903

Meeting Note Takers

Meeting recap notes are one of the best ways to get started contributing to a team. We still have a few open spots for May. If you would like to contribute, simply let the team know in Slack.

News

WordPress 6.0 – Release Candidate 1

WordPress 6.0 Release CandidateRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. 1 has been launched and contains the theme style variations and no major changes from here until May 24 release day. Please help us to test and improve this release.

Faculty Program Announcement

An announcement post about the Faculty Program is now live!

Sprint

May Sprint Progress

You can view more information about the May 2022 Sprint here.

Content Development

Here is a review of the work currently in progress and the work that has been published.

  1. Drafts
  2. Reviews
  3. Published

Want to help create content? Here’s our Help Needed info. Issues have been organized by priority and other labels:

  1. Ready to Create – You Can Help
  2. Topic Ideas

@caraya picked up Block Locking – Lesson Plan #739 for this sprint.

Website Development

If you’d like to contribute to the Training Team by developing, see the Website Development project board. We have organized issues by priority:

  1. High priority
  2. Good first issues

Training Team Administration

  1. 2022 Team Goal Setting
  2. Administrative tasks for the team, some of these are ongoing.

Social Learning Spaces (SLS) this Week

Open Discussions

We confirmed that some Training folks will be present at WCEU! For those attending, don’t forget to sign up for Contributor Day!

@piyopiyofox has begun outreach to new channel members

Coffee Hour will resume on 5/6.


Upcoming Meetings

You are welcome to join the team at any time! If you are new to the Training Team, please introduce yourself in the #training channel before the meeting (or anytime!) and feel free to join us in the meeting and participate as you are able.


Training Team Mission

The WordPress training team helps people learn to use, extend, and contribute to WordPress through synchronous and asynchronous learning as well as downloadable lesson plans for instructors to use in live environments, via learn.wordpress.org.

Getting Involved

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in, comment on posts, and participate in meetings and on projects.

  1. Learn.WordPress.org
    1. Lesson Plans
    2. Workshops
    3. Courses
    4. Social Learning Spaces
    5. Pathways to Learn WordPress
  2. Getting Involved
    1. GitHub Website Development
    2. GitHub Content Development
    3. What We Are Currently Working On This Month
  3. About The Team
  4. Our Team Blog

The Training Team Faculty Program is now live

The Training team Faculty Program is now live and accepting applications for folks to join the faculty team.

Use this link here to apply to join the Faculty Program today! You can also check out this page here for more information on how prospective faculty members’ applications are evaluated.

What is the Faculty Program?

The need for a Faculty Program similar to Community Deputies Program (see details here) was explored in October 2021 (see post here) as a path forward to better identify volunteer positions for folks joining the team, organizing work, and ensuring that the team is meeting the targets set together.

Note that just as you do not need to be a Community Deputy to contribute to community work, you do not need to be a Faculty Program member in order to contribute to the Training team’s goals. The benefit of a formalized and publicly listed Faculty team is that it makes it easier to know who is doing the work and able to set targets for getting things done.

The four broad role categories of responsibilities instituted in this program are:

  • Content Creators: Content Creators contribute new content to Learn WordPress. 
  • Editors: Editors assist with editing content created by the content creators.
  • Subject matter experts (SMEs): SMEs work with content creators and editors to provide expertise in their relevant subject area to ensure that the content is accurate and complete.
  • Administrators: Administrators perform the management and operations work involved in the Training Team and Learn WordPress.

You can read more in-depth information about these roles on the Areas of Responsibility page here, and explore what types of tasks can be performed within these roles in the Training Teams roles page here.

What’s next?

Existing Faculty members will be processing any applications that come in through the form, and will also start reaching out to community members who may be a good fit.

Know of someone who may be interested in joining the Faculty Program? Share this post!

Demo Sites for Learn WordPress Users

A long-desired feature for Learn WordPress is the ability for learners to use a live WordPress site as a learning environment as they go through courses on the site. In the absence of this feature, a workshop was published that instructs learners on how to set up a local WordPress installation, but this was merely a stopgap and was never meant to be a complete or final solution.

Well, there is now a much better solution for all learners on Learn WordPress: live WordPress demo sites, generously sponsored by WP Sandbox.

These sites are exactly what they sound like – a live WordPress website that the learner has complete control over and can use to enhance their learning experience by being able to immediately dive into the practical implementation of the course content. The sites (including all content, media, etc.) will expire and be permanently deleted after seven days, after which you can create a new one if you need to do so. They are full-featured WordPress installations with no limitations on functionality or features.

Demo sites include full access to the WordPress dashboard. In practice, this means:

  • Any content can be created
  • Media can be uploaded
  • Any theme or pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party can be installed
  • Content can be exported or imported

The following features are available from a service administrative standpoint:

  • Expiry time can be set to incremental amounts of time up to a maximum of 7 days
  • Multiple site templates can be created – a template can include any combination of plugins, themes, settings and content
  • Different website configuration templates can be used for different courses or content in order to provide more tailored learning experiences

I’m incredibly excited about this new feature as I have no doubt that it will be a boon for all learners on Learn WordPress. That being said, since hosting these demo environments uses very real resources, there is a limit of no more than 250 demo sites being active at any given time. This is why the expiry times are very important and also why the links to create a new demo site will only be available within course content (i.e. only to logged-in users).

Only allowing active course learners to use these links will reduce the likelihood of spam sites being created and using up the allocated quota. The Learn WordPress and WP Sandbox teams will be actively monitoring and shutting down spam sites if they are created, so please be mindful of how you use this excellent benefit.

Thanks to WP Sandbox for this wonderful sponsorship – I’m very excited to see how effective it is for learners!

Faculty Program: Structure Proposal

Now that the Training Team handbook has been filled out with everything needed to manage the processes and platform that the team manages, it’s now time to look at formalising the dedicated volunteer program that has been dubbed the ‘Faculty Program’. This program will allow the team to get more work done as more volunteers become involved.

The next step in preparing for the launch of this program is to outline the structure of the program – this primarily involves defining what roles and responsibilities can be fulfilled. While the handbook has a solid list of granular roles, it would make outreach more straightforward if the Faculty Program roles were more broadly defined, allowing people to know the area in which they’re contributing, as well as having the flexibility to help out in different ways.

Proposal

Here’s a proposal for the four broad areas of responsibility:

Content Creators
Content creators are people who contribute new content to Learn WordPress. This can be in the form of lesson plans, workshops, courses or social learning spaces. Content creators can write lesson plans, run social learning spaces, record workshops videos, write workshop scripts, edit workshop videos, or perform any other task related to content creation.

Editors
Editors assist with editing content created by the content creators. This can mean testing content or editing for accuracy, grammar, instructional effectiveness, accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility), localizability, SEO, or anything else that helps to improve the content that is created.

Subject matter experts (SMEs)
SMEs work with content creators and editors to provide expertise in their relevant subject area to ensure that the content is accurate and complete. Ideally, content creators would work with an SME from the very beginning of the creation process for any piece of new content.

Administrators
Administrators perform the management and operations work involved in the Training Team and Learn WordPress. This involves things like task and project tracking, facilitating meetings, taking notes in meetings, vetting new applications, managing the Help Scout queue, and anything else that keeps the wheels turning.

I have kept these areas intentionally broad and I think we should kick off the program with that mindset and then add more granular roles as time goes and we see a need for them.

Once we have these areas of responsibility finalised, we can document them and indicate how people can get involved in each one, and then begin reaching out to potential volunteers to bring them on board.

Feedback

How does this structure look to you? Please provide feedback along the following lines:

  1. Do the four broad areas above encompass everything the Faculty Program will be responsible for?
  2. Are there any other broad roles you think should be included?

Recap of the Training Team meeting, January 11, 2022

Recap of the Training Team meeting, January 11, 2022

Agenda

Ways to get involved

Slack Log (Requires SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. login to view. Set one up if you don’t have a Slack account.)

Live meeting attendees: @courane01 @rkohilakis @webtechpooja @arasae @azhiyadev @boogah @onealtr @peteringersoll @kemmy99 @elblakeo31


Meeting Notetakers


Team Goal Setting

Yesterday we concluded our team goal setting, and wow is this an exciting year.

We will have a read-out, or a summary of what was covered, published on the team site (P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/.) within a week.

Additionally, we are working toward using GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ projects within the LearnWP repo to track milestones and goals.

We are also exploring moving our TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. management of content across. Stay tuned. Some of these will pick up after the 5.9 release.

We discussed:

  • Actions and steps that we need to take to get the job done.
  • Obstacles we face in accomplishing all this and how can we overcome them.
  • Metrics we measure can measure and how we identify if it is successful or not.

APAC friendly meeting poll results

@webtechpooja gave 3 time choices:

  • Monday 9:30 – 10:30 am UTC
  • Thursday 7:30 – 8:30 am UTC
  • Thursday 11:30 am – 12:30 pm UTC

Thursday 11:30 am – 12:30 pm UTC got the most votes.


Social Learning Spaces (SLS) streaming platforms

Last week we began discussing if we will permit using the Social Learning Spaces calendar for additional formats beyond using MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. + Zoom. We’ve moved the conversation to a post to further gather ideas and questions before proceeding.

We approved @bph, who has already been vetted for hosting social learning spaces, will move forward with dev office hours using Meetup.

The concerns to address via our handbook encompass any further concerns or consider additional documentation needs.

This will remain open until Jan 14.


Learn WordPress version taxonomy

We also need comments on this post. The idea is that for 6.0, we’d like to have public taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. that only shows content relevant to that release, while from an internal auditing need, we also need to test everything with the latest release. 2 purposes in using the taxonomy at this time, and possibly more coming in the future.

This will also remain open until Jan 14, and then move on to a GitHub issue.


Badges

Congrats to @alexstine on receiving a Training team badge. Alex has provided valuable insights on several post types, such as courses and workshops, as it relates to accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) results. We deeply value the dev contribution and #accessibility team feedback on LearnWP.


January 2022 Sprint

With the release of 5.9 scheduled for this month, all our efforts have been focused on updating Learn.

Progress so far:
.. Styles lesson plan and List View lesson plan is ready for review.

.. RevisionsRevisions The WordPress revisions system stores a record of each saved draft or published update. The revision system allows you to see what changes were made in each revision by dragging a slider (or using the Next/Previous buttons). The display indicates what has changed in each revision. completed: Backing up your site, Child themeChild theme A Child Theme is a customized theme based upon a Parent Theme. It’s considered best practice to create a child theme if you want to modify the CSS of your theme. https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/advanced-topics/child-themes/. for classic themes, Classic Editor, Content Overview, Classic Theme Menu, CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings. Tagline

.. We still have a number of lesson plans and workshops that need to be revised or created. These are all listed on the Sprint.

.. For 5.9 – New Content

  1. Pick a topic, any topic from the list! Let us know in the comments or drop us a message in the #training Slack channel
  2. Get access, if you don’t have it already, to learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. Ask in the #training Slack channel.
  3. If you need help creating content, we’ve got some great workshops videos ready for you to learn how to do this: Lesson plan about lesson plans, workshops about lesson plans, and Workshop about workshops

All these instructions are listed in the January 2022 Sprint post. If you get stuck, just drop us a message in Slack.

.. Types of themes, please keep this in mind when creating and revising content for Learn WordPress.:

  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. theme: a theme made for FSE using HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. templates and theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML., allowing one to manage all parts of their site with blocks.
  • Universal theme: a theme that works with both the Customizer and the Site Editor.
  • Hybrid theme: a classic theme that adopts a feature(s) of FSE, like theme.json or the template editor.
  • Classic theme: a theme built with PHPPHP PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely-used open source general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for web development and can be embedded into HTML. http://php.net/manual/en/intro-whatis.php. templates, functions.php, and more that does not work with Site Editor.

See FSE Program: Answers from Round Three of Questions for information about the types of themes. (edited)

Thank you to @rkohilakis Makinde Ruth Oluwakemi @ courane01 @arasae Wessel who have volunteered to work on 5.9 content.


Checkin

@azhiyadev didn’t commit anything this week. She worked on Team goal setting and 5.9 revisions and managed to revise 5 lesson plans. Time is her main blocker. She is continuing to work on the 5.9 audit.

@rkohilakis shipped the first part of the FSE courses. She is working on a big internal work project to finish up this week, and then hoping to shift focus to 5.9 workshops.

@webtechpooja is going to audit for 5.9 release .

@courane01 committed lesson plans and workshops, team goal setting, and listing all content needing to be created or revised for release. She is working on more content in lesson plans and workshops for 5.9, assist creating the team goal setting summary/read-out, close the 2 posts on SLS + Taxonomy that we’ve requested feedback, work more on GitHub project migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies..

@arasae committed on the child theme for block themes. She set up some time with a content expert (@daisyo) to see how she does this. I’ll gather some documents as well for this. She is going to work on this lesson plan and may also see what I can do about theme.json. Will communicate if I manage to figure that out enough to commit!

5.9 Learn Content Planning Parties: A Proposal

This is a proposal for a very fun, very productive, very beginner-friendly way to get involved with our training team and create some content very quickly!.

We have this incredible list of curated 5.9 content topics (if you haven’t already, check out the brilliant sprint post to see what I mean: https://make.wordpress.org/training/2022/01/04/january-2022-sprint/) – two planned Zoom planning parties are proposed around the 5.9 release, complete with captions to make it more accessible. These two (or more, depending on interest!) Zoom parties would be scheduled at opposite ends of the day to make sure people who live in all time zones can join us.

During this planning party, we would…

  • chat about what are our highest priorities from that list (and pick some fun ones that we are interested in!)
  • Split into a few different Zoom rooms
  • explore the 5.9 release together in Zoom breakout rooms
  • generate lesson plans and new content for the 5.9 release–or at least, the messy thinking before the actual content is created

@arasae is going to pick a time and announce it.


Open Discussion

@courane01 shared a quote from the slack community:

I’m having a lot of gratitude for the great training material that the training team are putting out about FSE. I’m really excited about 5.9 and what’s to come. @wpfangirl

Nominations for Training Team Reps 2022

This post kicks off the call for Training team reps.

The Role

Each team has one or more representatives (reps). Team reps are responsible for communicating on behalf of their team to other contributor teams. They represent the team, collaborate with other teams, raise, manage and address any issues. This role averages two to five hours per week in team organizational duties.

The Election Process

We will follow the same process as other teams, dates may differ slightly.

Nominations

Nominations will open on November 3, 2021 at 12:00 UTC and will remain open until November 17, 2021 at 12:00 UTC. Please add your nominations as a comment on this post. You can nominate yourself or someone else if you think they are a great fit.

Elections

We will review the nominations at our team meeting on November 23, 2021. If there are more than 3 nominations, we will organize a poll to select the Team Reps.

If we need to have a poll, this will be open until 10 December 10, 2021 at 12:00 UTC. This takes into account the US Thanksgiving holiday.

Annoucements

We will announce the results at the next team meeting on November 23, 2021. If there are more than 3 nominations, we will announce the results at the December 14, 2021 team meeting.

If you have any questions, please ask in the comments!

#nominations, #training-team

Training Team Meeting Time Change Survey

The Training team currently runs 2 team meetings to cover the EMEA, Americas and APAC regions. We’re approaching that time of the year when clocks change for some regions. To accommodate this we propose changing the time we meet. Please indicate your preference.

EMEA and Americas

Tuesday 4:00PM UTC or 5:00PM UTC

APAC

Wednesday 2:00AM UTC or 3:00AM UTC

#time-change, #training-team

Should Learn WordPress contributors be GPL compliant?

In some cases – notably for anyone involved in a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. in any official capacity – WordPress contributors are required to be GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples. compliant. This means that any WordPress derivatives (i.e. themes, plugins, forks or distributions) that they distribute must be licensed under the GPL or a compatible licence. This isn’t the case for most areas of contribution, so let’s have a look at whether this should apply to contributors to learn WordPress.

The result of this conversation may seem obvious to some, but it’s good to discuss these things out in the open so that we have a documented record of where, why, and how these types of decisions have been made.

First, some precedents

In terms of contributions, Learn WordPress is an interesting blend of speaking and documenting depending on the area of contribution on the platform, so here are some precedents in both of those areas that we should be aware of:

Event speakers

Anyone who speaks at an official WordPress event (WordCamp, meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area., etc.) is only allowed to speak if any WordPress derivatives they distribute are licensed with a GPL compatible licence. This has always been the case, and for good reason. Speakers (and organisers) are seen to represent WordPress to their local community, so they need to embody the same freedoms that the GPL affords WordPress users.

Documentation contributors

Anyone can contribute documentation to WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/the Docs team handbook doesn’t have any specific requirements listed and allows anyone to get involved. Since documentation writers aren’t specifically representing WordPress in the same way that event speakers, this is not an issue. Also, documentation contributors aren’t directly recognised for their specific contributions in the context of where it took place.

Core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org.

Since CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. is the oldest area of contribution in the project it’s also worth taking a look at how contributors can get involved and are recognised here. Anyone can contribute to WordPress core, regardless of their GPL compliance. All contributors receive props for their contribution directly on TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/., as well as being thanked in the announcement post on WordPress.org/news. Their name in the announcement post is linked to their WordPress.org profile.

OK, so what does that mean for Learn WordPress?

Lesson plans

Lesson plan contributors do not have any GPL requirements – this is much the same as for documentation in that anyone can contribute and specific contributors are not recognised directly on the lesson plans themselves. This seems right to me and is the best way to encourage as many people as possible to contribute.

Workshops

Currently, all workshop presenters are credited on the workshop page with their name, avatarAvatar An avatar is an image or illustration that specifically refers to a character that represents an online user. It’s usually a square box that appears next to the user’s name. and full bio pulled from their WordPress.org profile (example). Since workshop presenters are a public face of the project in much the same way that WordCamp speakers are, we have also been operating under the same requirements as WordCamp speakers when it comes to being GPL compatible. This also seems right to me and I am of the opinions that we should continue with this requirement.

It is possible, however, for people to contribute content to a video workshop without being the presenter on the screen. This raises some questions:

  1. Do we credit non-presenting content contributors in the same way as presenters?
  2. Should non-presenting contributors have the same GPL compatibility requirements as presenters?

Since one of the primary motivations behind the GPL requirement is to ensure that anyone publicly representing WordPress does so in a way that is faithful to the licence, it makes sense for presenters to have that same requirement, but I don’t think we can say the same for non-presenting contributors.

A proposal

After considering a few ways we could move forward here, my proposal is the following:

  • Anyone contributing text-based content to Learn WordPress does not have to fulfil any GPL compliance requirements, this would apply to lesson plans and any other area that is text/image based.
  • Workshop presenters (i.e. people who appear in videos whether on video or audio) must continue to be GPL compliant just like WordCamp speakers need to be – presenters will be vetted at the time of their workshop application just like WordCamp speakers are vetted.
  • Anyone contributing to workshops who is not appearing in the video itself (i.e. helped to create the outline, script, slides, editing, or any other area) does not need to be GPL compliant.
  • Workshop presenters will still be listed on the workshop page with their name, avatar and bio as they are now, while anyone contributing to the workshop in any other capacity would be listed in a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. titled “Other contributors” with their name that is linked to their WordPress.org profile, just like in the core release announcements.

tl;dr: Anyone featuring in videos must be GPL compliant, but all other contributors need not be.

Feedback

Does this proposal sound like a good way to move forward? Please share any thoughts you have and we can discuss it all here.

This post will remain open for comments until the end of the day on Wednesday, 29 September. After that, comments will be summarised and we can formalise the guidelines based on this discussion

Learn WordPress Needs Assessment Results

In order to obtain an expert third-party view of what Learn WordPress needs in order to succeed, a leading digital learning consultant (AllenComm) was contracted to perform a full needs assessment of the platform. This needs assessment was funded by Automattic, and the research was entirely neutral and based on observations made by AllenComm themselves.

After a few months of this ongoing assessment, the final results have been delivered so here they are in their entirety.

First up, here’s a PDF of the full presentation of their findings:

Along with that, here are the results of the public user survey that was included in their research:

And, finally, they also created these interactive mockups of how Learn WordPress could be improved based on their findings.


Since there’s a lot to go through in all of that, here’s the executive summary of the findings from the assessment:

1. Make it minimal and meaningful

  • Offer assessments to determine level of expertise and user group.
  • Make the site easy to navigate with intuitive searching solutions with auto complete options for commonly searched terms.
  • Include filters that can be easily accessed with meaningful content.
  • Provide quick access to topics and solutions that apply to them. Because most use this for work obligations, they’ll need quick solutions and quick access.

2. Make it concise and customised

  • Provide a revolving carousel of new options for learning to ensure the new content gets cycled through and older content is flagged as possibly outdated.
  • Facilitate easy, simple options for them to take ownership to invest their own content based on the needs of the community.
  • Create badging or indicators that coincide with their level of expertise based on completion and contributions.

3. Make it iterative

  • Create flexible, current opportunities for the users to make the site their own based on their interests and level of expertise.
  • Apply dates to all materials so learners can determine if the content is applicable to current versions of their current processes.
  • Provide current, relevant supplementary materials for specific topics such as editors and plug-in functions. (PDF)

4. Make it interactive

  • Include training activities that encourage the users to apply or think through the application of new processes or solutions.
  • Don’t test them on knowledge, but instead outline various use cases for the lessons and materials.
  • Provide pre-recorded sessions and a way to ask questions of the presenter.

5. Make it interpersonal

  • Provide access to a collaboration of real people in real time so they can garner specific support when and where they need it.
  • Continue to provide instructional videos of real people who may share some struggles they’ve also had and how they’ve solved it.
  • Provide a feedback loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop. where they can offer suggestions and receive responses.

There are some very exciting ideas in there and there’s a lot that I’m looking forward to exploring further! It is important to note, however, that none of this is prescriptive – just because the report suggests we do something, doesn’t mean we need to do it. Our task from here is to use this to figure out just what we need and what we can implement from all of this.

Please discuss in the comments of this post and leave any thoughts or feedback you might have!