Team Profile Badges

Since the team profile badge handbook page is outdated, we are aiming to update it as soon as we can. Below are a few recommendations which we should consider before moving it to the handbook.

If you would like a badge on your WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile that acknowledges your contributions to the Training Team, the following criteria must be met:

  • Team On-boarding (Required) 
  • Training Contributor:
    • Writing – You have developed an approved lesson plan, tutorial and course from scratch or completely rewritten one that was out of date. Your efforts have moved the content from the “Drafts in Progress” stage to the “Review in Progress” stage on GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/.
    • Copyediting/Reviewing – You have successfully moved a lesson plan, tutorial and course from the “Review in Progress” stage to the “Published or closed” stage in Github.
    • Testing – You have completed a testing feedback form after using a lesson plan in an event and have updated the GitHub card with any suggested changes.
    • Auditing – You have audited 3 lesson plans or 3 tutorials or one course. Or you have surveyed the teams Learn WordPress GitHub Reposrepos The Training Team uses GitHub for working copies of lesson plans. You can find them at https://github.com/wptrainingteam. and created  5 GitHub issues for any needed functionality changes.
    • Connecting – You have made three tutorial recommendations or course recommendations by combining existing lesson plans and submitting your ideas through the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site.
    • Online Workshops – You have facilitated 3 Online workshops. 
    • Recap Notes – You have written 3 Recap Notes.
    • A significant code contribution to Learn such as adding or modifying features of the theme.
    • Other – the team may choose to award the badge for other contributions at the team’s discretion.
  • Training Team: You have admin rights on GitHub, HelpScout, the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site, and the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site. You assist with final reviews of lesson plans. You regularly contribute to meetings or the maintenance and management of the team. You have been involved for the past twelve months.

Awarding of profile badges: There will be a monthly review of contributions, and badges will be awarded at that time. A list of the new profile badges awarded will then be posted on the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. If you feel that you have earned the badge but were not listed, please leave a comment on that month’s retrospective blog post and include your WordPress.org username.

Post compiled by @courane01@azhiyadev

[Discussion] Reimagining the Training Team contributor roles

In this post, I have taken suggestions raised in recent team meetings regarding team onboarding, and present a new idea regarding the Training Team’s contributor roles. The model I propose reimagines the current “roles” of the team as “tasks”, and positions the Faculty members as mentors in 4 areas of expertise (administrator, subject matter expert, content creator, editor) within the team. 

Let’s discuss and see if this model can address the friction our new contributors are experiencing during onboarding.

The Goal

In recent sprint retrospectives (June & July Sprint, August Sprint), the Training Team identified a couple of needs related to our team roles. Here are some points of improvement raised in these retrospectives:

  • Better team role implementation, so new contributors will also have a clear picture of their assigned task(s).
  • Easing the onboarding process for newcomers and beginners.
  • Having a few folks who can focus on sorting GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issues consistently would be beneficial.
  • Increasing membership in the copy editor, reviewer, and auditor roles.
  • Assign a point of contact for new contributors to reach out to in each role.
  • It would be excellent to have onboarding videos/lesson plans for each role.
  • Continue building the handbook so contributors have more precise guidance.
  • Clear guidelines for new joiners, especially for basic and Intermediate-level contributors.

From these points, and other conversations the team has been having, I can see a few common goals we are aiming for:

  1. Improved clarity regarding team tasks
  2. Improved onboarding processes for team roles
  3. A point of contact for each role
  4. Better distribution of contributors throughout roles

An Idea

My idea is to view the 4 areas of Faculty responsibility as areas of expertise in the Training Team. This idea reframes what we’re calling “team roles” right now as “tasks” folks can do within each of those areas.

Four circles with the words administrator, content creator, subject matter expert, and editor in them. Each circle also lists some tasks that would fall into those areas of expertise. The words "Team Reps" connect them all in the middle.
Reimagining the Training Team roles as four areas of expertise

Onboarding pathways (for example courses and/or tutorials) would guide new contributors into each of these areas of expertise. How-to guides in the handbook would be the go-to resource for anyone wanting to complete a task. Contributors wouldn’t have to carry a role specifically. But there would be clear guidance for them to accomplish tasks and contribute to the team’s mission.

Faculty members would be contributors with experience in a specific area of expertise. They’d function as the point of contact for anyone needing help in that area of expertise. They’d also be mentors to other contributors wanting to grow in that area of expertise.

Your Feedback

  • What are your thoughts about this new team role model?
  • Do you see it responding to the areas of improvement raised in the team’s recent retrospective?
  • Are there any points of concern that should be addressed?

Please share your thoughts below. Based on the conversations we have in the comments, I’ll draft some next-steps for the team to consider at the end of the month.

#faculty-program, #roles, #training-team

Proposal: Merging Lesson Plans, Video Tutorials, and Slides

As a team, we’ve spoken about merging our content types, and even making it easier to create one of our long-requested content types.

Based upon our UX audit, we know we’ve got some site design work to be done.

Where are we now with Learn siteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. design?

  • For the landing page design, move forward with the first option shared.
  • For the archives page, the team landed on this design with containers around the lessons and filters in the right sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme.. Much of this piece has been done.
  • Finally, for the single lesson plan page, all looks good. The only two concerns raised were around whether or not the accordions could be made accessible and if it’s possible to add some sort of breadcrumb navigation.

These options have been sitting in the GitHub issue for some time. It seems now would be a good time to revisit this.

Where are we with Slides?

The team has been requesting support for Slides relatively as long as we’ve been a team. Our last real look had us considering a WordPress plugin that would create a Slides custom post type. Our GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issue is still open as well.

The advantage of doing this on Learn would more easily allow contributors to access the source file that may be used in recording videos from inside WordPress, vs access to the paid Canva account or tracking down Google Slides previously used.

Next steps:

  1. Implement lesson plan landing page and archives page designs.
  2. Consider single lesson plan layout. We’re most of the way there now. When improved, embed Video Tutorials into Lesson Plans, rename Lesson Plans to Tutorials.

Discussion needed:

  • The drop-downs on single lesson plan page are great. As a team, we’ve talked about keeping the example walkthrough fully displayed upon page load with a table of contents, while collapsing the sections like Objective Statements, Prerequisites, Materials needed, and other teacher bits behind those v dropdowns.

    What do we envision in current lesson plans being collapsed upon load?

  • If we bring videos in, and if that lesson plan has a video prominently at the top, would we envision the transcript being collapsed as well, or remain in sidebar as a button? We do require captions on WPTV before embedding on Learn.

    Example Video Tutorial.

    Are the outcomes and objectives here in unison with Lesson Plans objectives and descriptions?

    How will we show the transcript? How will this work with translations?

    Why do videos have a print layout option but lesson plans do not? What do we want displayed if someone wishes to print the lesson plan?

    What considerations do we have for this in merging?

  • Both content types have versions shown publicly, and any other publicly viewable taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies..

    Any additional considerations for combining these?

  • Slides: As a team, several contributors over the years have come forward expressing interest in getting this request passed. Currently there is a Slides pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that has been forked from the one tested above. It would still need to be submitted to the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team for review/approval to use on LearnWP.

    We can currently store reveal.js slides in GitHub, as shown on High Level Overview. However, making slides these way was a barrier to entry for many WordPress-familiar contributors.

    If/when the Slides plugin is available, do we want to embed the player in the single lesson plan OR do we want to link to it from the button in the right sidebar?

Please share your thoughts in the comments.

#slides

Brainstorming: Best practices for hosting Online Workshops

It’s been a while since the handbook page about hosting Online Workshops was originally published (in November 2021) — the team has hosted over 125 events since then! In the time that has passed since publishing that handbook page, I imagine that we’ve all learned a lot about hosting Online Workshops and what makes them run well.

So far, the tips and best practices that the handbook covers are:

  • Arrive early
  • Turn on accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) features
  • Consider Icebreakers
  • Set Expectations
  • Conclude

Have you hosted an Online Workshop? Or have you attended an Online Workshop that you feel went well? I would love to hear your thoughts on some more tips and best practices for hosting Online Workshops so we can update the handbook page with them. Please share in the comments!

Community Course Creation: A Proposal

Course creation is tough. It’s long; it’s laborious; but it’s glorious when finished.

I’d love to see more courses go live on WordPress – so, how can the community get involved in the creation of a collaborative course? 

I’ve written out some proposed steps we might take to create courses from start to finish. These are by no means permanent and are simply a suggestion of a process that may work.

The Overview (Visually)

A flowchart of the community course idea. It starts with a contributor having an idea; this contributor writes a proposal and submits it to the faculty program for review. This review can take anywhere from 48 hours to 1 week. If the faculty approves the course idea, they create a course github issue and assign a faculty buddy to help the contributor with learning objectives, audience, and micro-objectives (mini-lesson s that add up to a finished course project or "chunked" units). There will be a buddy planning conversation to generate these ideas. During their conversation, they will create a course project objective, focusing on what skills learners need to complete the course project. From there, they break the course into lesson plans; the content creator writes lesson plans and can collaborate with other training team contributors to create and complete lesson plans. As lesson plans are created, the creator's buddy can answer questions. Once all lesson plans have been completed, the training team will review all lesson plans using the normal process. After that, the buddy helps the creator create a course frame in learn.wordpress.org; they reach out to the marketing team with a proposed "finished" course timeline. At the same time, the creator migrates lesson plan content to learn.wordpress.org. A final review is conducted by both the training team and the marketing team. Final changes are made, and the course is published. Finally, the marketing team promotes the content.

Details

So you have a course idea. What should (could) you do first? (We have a documented process for this here, but this proposal aims to augment it to better serve the community).

  1. Write a Topic Proposal: I propose we create an intake form (a very simple one to start) on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ for this that asks users what course they might like to write, briefly describe it, and submit resources that already exist on Learn that would help shape this course (lesson plans, workshops, etc.)
    1. Looking for Inspiration: What makes a good topic? 
      1. Check the team’s Github for existing high-priority lesson plans that might make a better course than lesson plan.
      2. Consider new WordPress releases: are there related lesson plans waiting to be written that would make a good course?
      3. At some point, we will have a completed Needs Analysis that will help us determine the most high-impact courses; this will be good to reference when it is created.
  2. Get Approval: The training team should likely review course topic proposals and set up a meeting with the course proposer, which could be done by a process we set up within the faculty program or reviewed as a team at the weekly meeting. 
    1. Note: Courses are extremely time intensive, so I would also suggest creating a buddy/faculty member check-in program around this in order to help contributors with their ideas.
    2. Github Issue: Once this proposal has been approved, we will create a Github issue
    3. A Question: What should the timeline be for review? Is 48 hours enough (this would require faculty managing this), or a week (the greater team could help with this during the weekly meeting)?
  3. Brainstorm Canvas: This would be an outline we provide as the training team, specifically to generate ideas about the audience for the course, overarching course objectives, and the micro-course objectives (that will be used to make up the lesson plans for the course). An example of what a Brainstorm Canvas could look like can be found here (rough draft). I would also be open to walking through this with folks if they were interested ahead of time! 
    1. This brainstorm canvas can be done individually or during a Zoom call with a buddy / other interested contributors.
    2. There are no right or wrong answers on the brainstorm to start; once the brainstorm has been completed, a faculty member (likely an instructional designer, but basically anyone who is approved) should be pinged to review course objectives and work with the contributor to polish learning objectives.
    3. What is the timeline on reviewing a brainstorm? Would a week be enough time?
  4. Map It! Each micro-objective from the brainstorm will become the learning objective for a lesson plan within a course (example)
    1. The course will be made up of lesson plans. 
      • Some lesson plans may already exist about that topic and may simply need to be modified for an online audience; 
    2. Other lesson plans will need to be created; these can be written either by the course creator, or with others assisting.
  1. Create the Course Frame: Once a user creates a map of the anticipated lesson plans within a course, they can get started creating the course structure within learn.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/.
    1. Write the introduction: This introduction should help learners assess their own readiness (readiness question), explain what a learner should be able to do at the end of the course, help learners set up what they need to be successful in the course, and establish several other things that are present in most lesson plan – need to be revised for courses, potential course outline to help users experience success here?
  2. Write each Lesson Plan on Learn.WordPress.org: 
    1. These lesson plans should be included in the monthly sprint and recorded in Github.
    2. As you complete a rough draft of each of the lesson plans, make sure to keep the Github board updated and let the #training team know during the weekly meeting or as you complete it.
    3. Link each Github Lesson Plan to the course Github as they are created.
    4. One concern I have: There is a lot of “extra” (but important) information in each lesson plan that may distract students from the content they’re expecting to receive. We’ve talked about…
      1. Having a toggle button to show teachers what they need to know in order to teach content when pressed
      2. We may also consider ways to streamline the lesson plan creation process and/or the way content is displayed. 
      3. We also might want to consider if these lesson plans should be identical to the ones that exist already, or if we need a secondary format specifically geared towards online learning. For example, an existing lesson plan may say, “Put students into groups and have them discuss X topic” which wouldn’t work for an online, asynchronous format. 
  1. Rough Drafts to Finalized Versions: Completed lesson plans will go through the typical review process:
    1. It will be reviewed for content, copy edited (likely with this copy editing checklist), and for accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) (making sure every image has a detailed alt text and descriptive title, that links are descriptive, and every video has a caption, to name a few examples)
    2. If a course is in progress, it may be useful to organize “mini sprints” to get feedback and insight from faculty members on all lesson plans in a timely manner.
  2. When all lesson plans / modules are complete, a final review will be conducted.
    1. We can make a brief checklist here to help faculty members and training team contributors review content quickly, but basically this is a final set of eyes on the finished product.
    2. At this point, we can publish the course!
    3. We may want to consider working with #marketing ahead of time to announce the course and get eyes on it, but in my view, not at the expense of slowing it getting it out into the world.
  3. PUBLISHED! The course goes live, and everyone celebrates.

What do you think of these proposed steps? What should be changed, added, or removed? 

Please leave your thoughts in the comments section here, and in a few weeks’ time, we will finalize how we would like to move forward. I will create a list of action items to be put into Github for what documents, supports, ettc. need to be created.

#contributors, #courses, #getting-involved, #process

Rethinking the Lesson Plan Creation & Updating Process

Tl;dr: Some contributors express confusion when attempting to contribute to lesson plan creation. This post aims to look at how we can improve that experience by documenting the barriers experienced by these contributors, raising additional questions for the team’s consideration, and making suggestions for consideration on how to move forward.

What barriers are the team seeing?

Since June of last year, we’ve seen about 1-2 lesson plans reach publication per month. Alongside those accomplishments, we’re also seeing a number of inconsistencies being flagged in our documentation around the process, and new contributors voicing apprehension about getting involved. 

I’m sure that together we can work toward some good solutions for folks, so I’ve listed the inconsistencies I’ve picked up from contributors below for consideration:

  • There exists conflicting information on creating lesson plans:
    • The Workshop on Creating a Lesson Plan is inconsistent with the Lesson Plan and The Handbook (How to Submit a Lesson Plan Idea).
    • There are three different lesson plan style guides, two from the Training Team Handbook (here and here), and one that exists as the GitHub Issue template.
      • The format in the GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issue template is the correct one to follow, but that is more a template, not a step-by-step detailed guide to putting together a lesson plan.
      • This Lesson Plan Style Guide linked on the How to Conduct an Instructional Review page here seems to be a more effective guide on how to fill in the details of each section but doesn’t include the updated items from the template. Getting that style guide updated would require an understanding of what’s required for the new sections, and including details there.
  • There are steps without any documentation:

Additional questions for discussion

These additional questions can branch off into their own respective posts if needed, but as they relate to the current lesson plan process, I’ve included them below for consideration as well:

  • What is a reasonable turnaround time for content reviews, for the purpose of keeping contributors motivated and eager to come back to do more? (41 are currently awaiting review)
  • What is a good goal to set in regards to lesson plan publications? (We currently do not metrics noted in the team goals, and since the How to Create a Lesson Plan workshop was created on June 14 2021, there have been 22 lesson plans published on Learn)
  • What can we do to ensure that this process is inclusive? (Ranging from diversity of submitters, to published languages, etc)?
  • How long should it ideally take to design a lesson plan from start to finish?
    • For those of us who are writing lesson plans, what’s working for you? Where are some places you’ve gotten stuck and why?
    • For those of us who want to write lesson plans but aren’t, what’s an obstacle in your way?
    • Team reps, what do you absolutely love about our process? What steps are essential in the designing of lesson plans?

Process improvement recommendations for discussion

Of course before launching into solutions, it would be helpful and great to also hear from other training team members and our Reps about what they like, why they did what they already did, and what they want to see change. 

The suggestions listed below are to help start fruitful conversation about what was flagged above:

  • Set a metric goal for lesson plans to help us sustainably tackle the backlog
  • Decide if the steps with missing pages are necessary, optional (nice to have), or should be deleted
  • Review, simplify, and consolidate the “Creating a Lesson Plan” guides in the Handbook, Workshop, and GitHub; reducing link-outs where duplicative
  • Shorten and Simplify the ‘Development Checklist” in Github
  • Identify ideal turnaround times for each step in the production -> publication process

#lesson-plans

Migrating Contributor Training to Learn WordPress

For some years, the Community Team has managed the Contributor Training site. The site exists to house training materials for contributors to WordPress. The content currently includes training for various Community Team programs as well as general training around collaboration for contributors on all teams.

Now that Learn WordPress is up and running it makes sense to consolidate all the community-based training content in one place. This will be good not only for streamlining content locations but also because no one is actively maintaining the Contributor Training site, while Learn WordPress is actively managed and maintained.

This consolidation involves two processes:

  1. Migrating the courses, lessons and quizzes across from one site to the other.
  2. Migrating the existing learner data from one site to the other.

Number 1 is easy – I tested it out and the content can all be migrated using WordPress’ built-in export/import tools with no issues.

Number 2 is a bit more work and will involve working with the MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team. I have chatted to @dd32 about the work and it seems like it won’t be too onerous.

I don’t anticipate any objections to this process since it’s really just consolidating content from two disparate locations on the WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ network, but if you can think of any reason why this would be a bad idea then please comment on this post.

/cc +make.wordpress.org/community/ +make.wordpress.org/meta/

Training Team Goals for 2022

Vision

In 2022, the Training Team will empower users to achieve their goals with WordPress through actionable and practical learning experiences that bring the community together.

Values

The Training team values clear, open-source, quality content that fosters diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging among its contributors.

For WordPress users who want to grow, Learn.WordPress.org is a platform that offers high-quality learning opportunities. Learn WordPress is the official source of information and learning about both the software and its community, and is free to use. It is produced for the community by the community.

Stakeholders

Whose input shapes what we do? Who are we doing this for? (users, providers, influencers, governance)

Also visit the post: Who can Learn WordPress help

  • Users
  • WordPress Open SourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. Software Project
    • Project executive leadership
    • Make teams
    • Contributors
    • MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. & WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers
  • Extenders with livelihoods related to WordPress
  • Informal community gatherings (social media groups, owned forums/events/SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/./socials)

Representation of Stakeholders

We aspire to have representation from diverse organizations and individuals within and beyond the WordPress ecosystem, including:

  • Scale/sizes of organizations
  • Locales
  • Freelancer marketplace
  • Enterprise/agency
  • Product and service providers (pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party/theme devs, SaaS, Integrations)
  • WP Communicators (bloggers, podcasters, hosts)
  • Hiring organizations (contract or employer)
  • External trainers/instructors 
  • AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility), Internationalization, and Diversity
  • Open Source Software

Methods and Priorities for team goals

  • Needs Analysis
    • Define learning experiences
    • Onboard subject matter experts
    • Site functionality
  • Team organization
    • Contributor onboarding, tracking, outreach
    • Cross-team collaboration
  • Official WordPress certification

Obstacles

What could potentially make these goals difficult to achieve and what specific actions can be done to overcome any obstacles?  Dependencies, risks, etc.

  • Awareness about LearnWP and value proposition
  • Quality/accuracy control of materials
  • Keeping pace with WP releases
  • Limitations of the Learning Management System (LMS)
  • Site functionality and design
  • Gathering issues and ideas at the right phase of planning and implementation
  • Time
    • Availability for existing and new: content creators, site developers, volunteer/self-sponsored contributors, sponsored contributors
    • Familiarity with tools and procedures
    • Ongoing impact of COVID
  • Distinguishing the audience (learner, facilitator/teacher)
  • Competing stakeholder priorities
  • Team agreement on types of learning experiences, alignment of content types to the vision
  • The scope of Who can Learn WordPress help is a vast audience.

Evaluation

How will we know we have achieved success or successfully completed our tasks from the chosen methods. 

  • Feedback forms for those who have used a lesson plan, completed a workshop, completed a course
  • Anticipated content creation:
    • 6 courses per year
    • 4 social learning spaces per week
    • 1 workshop per week
  • Data collection methods needed in conjunction with determining goals for each:
    • Results from 2022 Annual WP Survey 
    • Support team indication of common questions in forums. Informal cross-team collaboration inquiring about common trends and ways Learn WordPress can be a resource for Support. 
    • Increased visitors to LearnWP
    • Download stats
    • Mentions of LearnWP in media
    • Average course completions
    • Google Analytics
    • VideoPress metrics
    • Popularity metrics
    • Social learning spaces attendees – new and repeat
    • Number of WP contributors
    • Quantity of training team contributors and content created

Milestones

March 1, 2022

  • Use GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Projects in LearnWP repository for managing team activity
  • Implement a Faculty program (like Community Deputies, name to be determined)
  • Brainstorm and discovery for the creation of a Needs Analysis
  • Plan promotions with the Marketing Team
  • Create Instructor/Facilitator resources portion on LearnWP

June 1, 2022

  • Conduct Needs Analysis
  • Create content useful for WordCamp Europe
  • Release roadmap of new content (that isn’t tied to WP releases/features)
  • Assess content that has the largest impact
  • Overhaul the “Submit an Idea” form. Build in conditional logic for workshop, lesson plan, and course.
  • Ongoing promotions collaborations with other Make teams such as Marketing, Polyglots, Docs, Accessibility, Community

September 1, 2022

  • Curriculum Advisory Board (working title) planning and outreach  
  • Site functionality roadmap
  • Redesign of site based upon UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it. audit and Needs Analysis
  • SEO for site structure
  • Content filters based upon interest or profession
  • Defined learning pathways
  • Merge lesson plans and workshops
  • Content for onboarding contributors (Make teams, Meetup organizers, WordCamp volunteers)
  • Ongoing promotions collaborations with the Marketing Team
  • Create content for WordCamp US

December 1, 2022

  • Plan the discovery phase for official WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ certification
    • Comparing other Open Source Software methods
    • Compare other Open Source Software training models
    • Compare any proprietary certifications and training prep
    • Collect the issues, what works, what didn’t work well
  • Define Cohorts – strategy and handbooks
  • Define courses toward certification with pathways and outcomes
  • LearnWP Admin Dashboard to track stats and contribution 
  • Option of portfolio-worthy projects for users to run alongside courses
  • Ongoing promotions collaborations with the Marketing Team

Props

Attendees: Thanks to @azhiyadev @webtechpooja @courane01 @hlashbrooke @west7 @arasae @rkohilakis @chrisbadgett @docpop @peteringersoll @kemmy99 @meher @webcommsat who participated in 3 team goal setting meetings.

Proofreading: Thanks also to @webtechpooja @webcommsat for proofreading this summary of the goals for 2022.

#goals, #learn-wordpress

Learn WordPress Version Taxonomy

In Learn WordPress, there is a taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. based upon WordPress versions used internally for auditing content.

Originally, this was used as a means of comparing or auditing content to ensure it includes any information about the latest versions. It is a checkpoint to indicate we have recently reviewed this content.

We now have several goals with this taxonomy:

  1. This content has been confirmed with the corresponding release version. At this time, this is an internal use-case, but we could envision using this publicly in a changelog at the bottom of lesson plans, workshops, courses to view content from previous versions.
  2. This content is contains new or important features about the latest release. This is public-facing and can help curate a page of relevant content per release on Learn.

The taxonomy created is now publicly accessible: https://github.com/WordPress/learn/pull/292. However, this may be quite cluttered with content comparison checks and not exclusive to features related to the current release.

Learn WordPress lesson plan landing page highlighting the WordPress version filter located in the sidebar
Learn WordPress lesson plan landing page

Thoughts to consider:

  • Should these live in 1 taxonomy area or should these live in 2 separate taxonomies?
  • How do we envision using that in the admin area?
  • How do we need data to publicly display now, and in the future?
  • What additional considerations should we have?

We’ll leave this post open until January 14 before progressing to GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Issues.

Social Learning Spaces Streaming Platforms

Social Learning Spaces are seeing considerable traction with attendees. You can find the calendar of events at https://learn.wordpress.org/social-learning/. This also appears by default in the WordPress Events and News widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. inside ever WP Admin Dashboard.

Questions arose around expanding the use of the platform. Training was asked to consider including these events onto the calendar:

  1. Gutenberg Developer Hour Series
  2. Creating a Block-based theme from scratch

We approved GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ Developer Hour Series, as Birgit is already vetted by community deputies and this is an initiative begun in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. It would be hosted using the existing methods with MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. + Zoom.

For content that may be broadcast in a new manner, such as using a Twitch stream, we’d like additional guidelines to be included in the team handbook.

Questions to be considered:

  1. How much branding is appropriate? Custom Zoom branding, backgrounds, etc.
  2. Is it permitted during the broadcast to mention “follow/subscribe to this channel on Twitch/Facebook/Twitter whatever to know when I go live again”?
  3. What if users need to enter an email to view the broadcast?
  4. What if the additional streaming platform requires an RSVP as well?
  5. Share additional questions in the comments below

This post will remain open until January 14. From there, a summary will be presented to the team and additional guidelines added to the team handbook.