A Small Shift in Focus

For some time now, the Training Team has been concerned with writing and publishing lesson plans. We currently have approximately 90 of them in GitHub repos (see https://github.com/wptrainingteam). However, the topics are rather random and in various states of completion and accuracy, and we’re not doing a good job of prioritizing our efforts.

What if we shifted our focus from creating individual lesson plans to committing to providing resources and focus for a coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. set of workshops. We have always had the idea of combining lesson plans into “recipes” for workshops. This shift in focus would have us identifying 6-10 “core” workshops (maybe we need a different word than “core”?) and the lesson plans that make them up. We could then work on sprints to create and update one workshop at a time. These workshops/lesson plans would also be reviewed regularly to maintaining their accuracy as time goes on.

The goal of this shift is to help us manage our lesson plans better, complete the ones needed most, and then keep them up-to-date.

To be clear, we would continue to welcome all ideas for lesson plans. Some of those ideas might come and go over time (e.g., post formats, GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/, etc.). But those would be in addition to the “core” workshops and perhaps be more perishable.

We are in the process of identifying the “core” workshops that we would support. Initial suggestions were:

  1. Introduction to WordPress
  2. Introduction to Theming
  3. Build Your First PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party
  4. AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility)
  5. Best Practices for Content Creators
  6. Set up e-Commerce
  7. Marketing Your Site (SEO)
  8. Contributing to WordPress

We would very much like to hear your ideas on these “core” workshops. You can help us by answering any or all the following questions:

  1. What might be a better term than “core” workshops?
  2. Which of these suggested workshops might not be needed?
  3. Do you have an idea for a workshop that isn’t represented here?
  4. What do you think should be covered within any of those suggested workshops? What should people be able to do when they’ve completed them?

We’d love to hear your ideas!

Proposal to change the weekly meeting time

The makeup of the majority of team contributors has shifted to the Eastern Hemisphere and our current meeting time does not accommodate those timezones very well. Therefore it is proposed to change the weekly meeting time to 13:00 UTC.

We will discuss this at the meeting on 25 April which will still be at 19:30 UTC and if there are no objections, it will take effect on 2 May.

Training Team Profile Badges – Final Proposal

The Training Team proposes the following criteria for their profile badges:

  • Team On-boarding (Required): You have joined the #training channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., been added to the TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. board and the GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ organization. You have read through the Getting Started information (https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/getting-started/) and are familiar with the lesson plan template, the team’s workflow, and the teams tools (GitHub, ZenHub, and Trello). You understand the various channels of communication and know when and how they should be used.
  • Training Contributor:
    • Writing – You have developed an approved lesson plan from scratch or completely rewritten one that was out of date. Your efforts have moved a lesson plan from the “Drafts in Progress” stage to the “Instructional Review” stage in Trello.
    • Copyediting/Reviewing – You have contributed five (5) pull requests in GitHub. Or you have successfully moved a lesson plan from the “Copyediting in Progress” stage to the “Style Guide Review” stage OR from the “Style Guide Review” stage to the “Ready for Final Review” stage in Trello.
    • Testing – You have completed a testing feedback form after using a lesson plan in an event and have created GitHub issues for any suggested changes.
    • Auditing – You have audited three (3) lesson plans or surveyed the team’s GitHub reposrepos The Training Team uses GitHub for working copies of lesson plans. You can find them at https://github.com/wptrainingteam. and created GitHub issues for any needed changes.
    • Connecting – You have made three (3) workshop recommendations by combining existing lesson plans and submitting your ideas through the https://learn.wordpress.org/ site (when ready).
    • Other – the team may choose to award the badge for other contributions at the team’s discretion.
  • Training Team: You have admin rights on GitHub, Trello, ZenHub, and/or the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. You assist with final reviews of lesson plans. You regularly contribute to meetings or the maintenance and management of the team. You have been involved within the past twelve months.

Awarding of profile badges: There will be a monthly review of contributions, and badges will be awarded at that time. A list of the new profile badges awarded will then be posted on the https://make.wordpress.org/training/ site. If you feel that you have earned the badge but were not listed, please leave a comment on that month’s blog post and include your GitHub username and your WordPress.org username.

#badges, #procedures

Training Team Profile Badges

There has been a recent flurry of pull requests from people new to the Training Team. Most of these pull requests are fixing small issues with the lesson plans – and we have many of those! However, these contributors have not introduced themselves to the team in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. or participated in the team’s meetings. Their efforts are seemingly to procure the Training Team badge on their WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile. That raises the issue of what the requirements are to secure those badges.

The Training Team would like to be more transparent and consistent and define the criteria for giving profile badges to people who contribute to our team.

Other WordPress.org Teams

Looking at how a few other non-code-focused teams handle their badges…

The MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. Team

“On your profile, badges are added based on your contributions to the WordPress project. There are two kinds of badges: contributor and team. The contributor badges are generally assigned to anyone who has contributed to a particular team. Meanwhile, the team badges are given to those who are active on their team. Each team can set its own criteria for who should get each badge. When possible, the meta team will automate badge assignment.”

(https://make.wordpress.org/meta/handbook/documentation/profile-badges/)

The Polyglots TeamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/.

The Polyglots Team requires ten string translations to earn their Contributor badge. The also have an “Editor” badge which is given when a person has Editor status on a [locale].wordpress.org site.

The Support Team

“We have official badges for Support Contributors and Support team members. For the moment being, these badges are awarded manually to active contributors. In the future, we hope to be able to automate that process, and then use the following criteria:

  • Support Contributor: You have contributed over 400 support replies.
  • Support Team: You have been promoted to Moderator.”

(https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/contributing-to-the-wordpress-forums/volunteering-in-the-forums/)

The Documentation Team

The documentation team is probably the team that is the closest to the Training Team in their responsibilities. They do not yet have criteria for their badges but are also working on this.

Recommendation for Discussion

One-time contributions are very welcome, but perhaps not the purpose of the badges. As a starting point for discussion, let’s consider the following:

  • Training Contributor:
    • Writing – You have developed an approved lesson plan from scratch or completely rewritten one that was out of date.
    • Copyediting / Reviewing – You have contributed 10 pull requests over a period of more than 30 days.
    • Testing – You have completed 3 testing feedback forms after using a lesson plan in an event.
    • Auditing – Review 3 lesson plans and create GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issues for any needed changes.
    • Connecting – Make 3 workshop recommendations by combining existing lesson plans.
  • Training Team: You have admin rights on GitHub and/or the make.wordpress.org/training site.

Too easy? Too difficult? Does it deter people or encourage them? Is the “over 30 days” part a good idea? Thoughts? These criteria are up for discussion!

Handbook Update

Work is well under way on the handbook overhaul. Unfortunately, I will not be as fully present in today’s meeting as I had hoped due to impending weather.

My personal organization for the handbook work is found at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gA807bKaaFBOBcgBm2gqQGFkEj1JDCBaBdETILmMvnk/edit?usp=sharing.


The About page will be revised after other child-pages are completed to determine what is unique to this page and what can be linked to for more thorough details.

On the Who We Are page, the team leadership area needs a description. Please review https://make.wordpress.org/updates/team-reps/ regarding team organization. What “roles” do we want to share here beyond the 2 team reps?

Action item: who can write a paragraph or so about our team organization?


For the Contribute/Get Involved area, what is our preferred top-level page named? I like that the Docs team uses “Get Involved” https://make.wordpress.org/docs/handbook/get-involved/.

Also, some of the information here likely will duplicate About > What We Do https://make.wordpress.org/training/handbook/about/what-we-do/. How much text should duplicate vs linking to the other page?

Action item: What do we name this page?

On the Contributor Day page, a review for what information is still applicable/current would be appreciated.

In particular, the page states “Choose a card from the “Lesson Plan Backlog” list on the TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. board”. It looks like that has been reworked in Trello. Can that be updated and linked to specifically?

Action item: one person to revise the page with any more recent details. Change term of Backlog to appropriate linked Trello column.


The Guidelines page/section is awaiting @juliekuehl to revisit & revise.

Action item: Julie will revise or offer the task for another team member to complete.


Areas not yet worked on:

  1. What We’re Working On Now
  2. Learn WordPress site – top level page that describes that our work is presented on the Learn siteLearn site The Training Team publishes its completed lesson plans at https://learn.wordpress.org/ which is often referred to as the "Learn" site. with a link to it.
  3. Resources
  4. FAQ
  5. Old lessons (until Learn launches)

Time to Set Team Goals for 2019

It’s that time of year when we need to evaluate how we did against our goals for this year and make new goals for the upcoming year.

In 2018 our goals were to:

1. Create handbook
2. Move lesson plans to GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/
3. Restructure make.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org//training
4. Fix broken images
5. Update lesson plans for 4.8-4.9/GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/
6. Make workshop recommendations
7. AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) workshop

In fact, 2018 was a year where the team underwent a major restructuring of its tool and processes and we accomplished goals we hadn’t imagined when the year started. So our accomplishments for the year can be summed up as:

1. Create handbook (expected by the end of the year)
2. Move lesson plans to GitHub
3. Restructure make.wordpress.org/training
4. Fix broken images (perhaps not all are fixed, but moving to GitHub addressed the problem)
5. Make workshop recommendations
plus
6. Onboarding improvements including a PDF and videos
7. Team management on TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing. and in Waffle.io
8. Creation of the https://wptrainingteam.github.io/ page
9. Work towards the relaunch of the learn.wordpress.org site including collaboration with the #design, #marketing, and #meta teams.

Goals that we didn’t quite accomplish include:

1. Update lesson plans for Gutenberg
2. Accessibility workshop

So, for 2019 what should our new goals be? I’d propose a couple to begin with:

1. Launch learn.wordpress.org
2. Create several lesson plans to combine into an accessibility workshop (the ARIA session from WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US has caught my eye…)
3. Use resources from WordPress.tv more often as a basis for lesson plans
4. Collaborate with other efforts such as the diversity speaker training and Kids Camp to get their material available from the learn.wordpress.org site
5. Increase the number of regular contributors to the team

These all seem very do-able. What else should the team be working towards? What should we have for stretch goals? All comments and ideas welcome!

We’ll also be discussing this during our meeting this week. Everyone is invited to join in the discussion!!!

Proposed Handbook Outline

 

  1. About
    1. What we do
    2. Origin story https://make.wordpress.org/marketing/handbook/about/whats-our-origin-story/
    3. Vision
    4. Tasks
    5. Team leadership
  2. Get Involved
    1. First steps
    2. Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.
      1. Organize
      2. Participate
    3. Areas to contribute
      1. Present a lesson & Feedback
      2. Write a lesson
      3. Review lesson plans
      4. Other
  3. Communication
    1. Meetings
      1. agenda/notes etc P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/.
      2. SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.
    2. TrelloTrello Project management system using the concepts of boards and cards to organize tasks in a sane way. This is what the make.wordpress.com/marketing team uses for example: https://trello.com/b/8UGHVBu8/wp-marketing.
    3. GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/
    4. Creating meeting notes
  4. General Guides
    1. Style Guide
      1. Tools (screenshots)
      2. Lesson plan
        1. Template
        2. Example
      3. Slides
        1. Template
        2. Example
    2. Presenting
      1. Single plans
      2. Workshop
  5. Roadmap
  6. Learn WordPress site
  7. Resources
  8. FAQ
  9. Old lessons (until Learn launches)

WordCamp US 2016 Contributor Day Planning

WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US is approaching and will be in Philadelphia in early December, with a contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. on the 4th. Since this will be an opportunity for many contributors of the training team to meet in person we want to make sure we’re gathering a list of all of the items we’d like to address as a team beforehand to make the most efficient use of our time together.

We’ll chat about this subject over the next few weeks in team meetings and will use this post as a place to store our thoughts and asynchronously share our ideas.

Please add your ideas in the comments!

Copyediting Process and Tools for Lesson Plans

The topic of what process should be used for copyediting lesson plans and what tools could be used came up during the October 11 Make WordPress Training Meeting. During the SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. discussion, questions arose about how team members should handle copyediting concerns.

  • Is there a definitive process for new copy editors to follow?
    • What basic guidelines should be followed?
  • How are editing changes handled?
    • Make style edits on the fly?
      • RevisionsRevisions The WordPress revisions system stores a record of each saved draft or published update. The revision system allows you to see what changes were made in each revision by dragging a slider (or using the Next/Previous buttons). The display indicates what has changed in each revision. track changes
    • How to handle major edits?
      • Use strikethrough to flag deletions?
      • Use highlighting to flag additions?
      • Create a new document when rewriting?
      • Need review before committing?
        • By original writer or another editor?
  • What is the difference between copyediting and rewriting?
  • Does the copy editor need to contact the original writer?
  • How should comments be relayed between writers and editors?
  • Can we add a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to provide built-in features for extensive editing?

The Make WordPress Training Getting Started page indicates the various roles of contributors on the Training Team:

  • Writing – Create lesson plans.
  • Copyediting – Check lesson plans for grammar, spelling and punctuation and make sure it aligns with our style guide.
  • Testing – Help run tests of betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. lessons at Meetups or workshops and let us know how it went.
  • Auditing – Check content for accuracy with the current version of WordPress
  • Connecting – Group lesson plans that together would coordinate for a workshop
  • Reviewing – Screenshots to compare with current appearances

The workflow for Training Lesson Plans is tracked on a Google Apps Sheet: WP Community Training Lesson Plan Progress as in the Getting Started section. The general workflow for lessons is tracked in a Status field:

  1. In Progress
  2. Ready for copyediting
  3. In Copyediting
  4. Ready for testing
  5. Complete

In addition there is tracking of lesson assignments with the following fields:

  • Current Owner
  • Username
  • Previous Owners
  • Progress
    • Started
    • Date to Complete
  • Team Review
    • Copy Editor
    • Status
  • Final Review
    • Testing Stage
    • Testing Results
  • Ongoing Review

There is a Key tab in the Progress Sheet, but that appears to be out of date:

  • correct
  • needs copyeditor recheck
  • abandoned
  • possibly abandoned
  • Ready to Test

Make WordPress Training includes two guides for writing and editing lesson plans:

There is a set of guides and tracking documents already in place; it seems they could be reviewed for updates and documentation to clarify the copyediting process.

Plugin features would be helpful for copyediting tasks and workflow for published lesson plans. However, with editorial tracking already in place with the Progress sheet, the plugin does not need to recreate nor constrain that part of the process.

Some potential solutions:

  • Revisions to backtrack editorial changes
  • Apply strikethrough & color coding to text during editing for review
  • Google G Suite Docs
    • Revisions History
    • Suggestions
    • Comments
      • TagTag Tag is one of the pre-defined taxonomies in WordPress. Users can add tags to their WordPress posts along with categories. However, while a category may cover a broad range of topics, tags are smaller in scope and focused to specific topics. Think of them as keywords used for topics discussed in a particular post. user
    • Bookmarks
    • Footnotes
    • Research Tool
    • Dictionary
    • Offline mode
  • Editflow plugin:
    • Calendar – A convenient month-by-month look at your content.
    • Custom Statuses – Define the key stages to your workflow.
    • Editorial Comments – Threaded commenting in the admin for private discussion between writers and editors.
    • Editorial Metadata – Keep track of the important details.
    • Notifications – Receive timely updates on the content you’re following.
    • Story Budget – View your upcoming content budget.
    • User Groups – Keep your users organized by department or function.
  • JetPack plugin—After the Deadline:
    • Contextual Spell Checking
    • Advanced Style Checking
    • Intelligent Grammar Checking

Are there other copyediting concerns or potential solutions?

User Experience of Training Team Make Site

Folks in the training team have collectively provided bits of feedback about the current structure of the Make site for the team for a little while. This conversation turned into more of an in-depth evaluation of the site and it’s purpose at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. NYC’s contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. this past month. In this post, I’m summarizing some of the key pieces of that conversation (myself, @melindahelt and @Becks979 attended) and applying pieces of that conversation to the current structure of the website. Please add your thoughts as to what pieces of the website need to shift in the comments of this post.

General Thoughts

  1. It needs to be more clear that there are completed lesson plans that can be used in real life.
    • I’m starting to think that the “Lesson Plans” navigation item should lead to a landing page that describes the available workshops rather than the long list of workshops in progress.
  2. Examples that show different ways to use the lesson plans would be helpful
    • We could include case studies, for example, that show how the plans have been used at a meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area., at a mini-workshop, at a conference, etc.
  3. We need a handbook.
    • Most Make teams have a handbook that contains the logistical information about how to contribute to the team and how the team self-organizes. This information is scattered across our site currently and needs to be gathered into one location (e.g. style guide,
  4. The lesson plans in progress need an explanation.
    • The handbook on the site is currently used to house the in-progress lesson plans, which is confusing due to it’s inclusion of partially completed plans. An introduction on the first page that explains what this is – and what it isn’t – would be helpful.
  5. Inconsistent use of tagging/categories
    • At different times, folks have categorized/tagged the blog posts on the site differently, leading to a somewhat meaningless structure. @courtneyengle had started to clean this up at one point and perhaps this is something we should revisit.
  6. Areas of Focus
    • The “Areas of Focus” blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. on the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. was intended to be an easy way to find the threads that relate to current conversations the team was having. It hasn’t been used as such much this year, though we were very consistent about using it this way during the second half of 2015. Perhaps this section should be renamed something like “current priorities”? Some of the content linked from it now should really go in a handbook instead and we could use it to bookmark key blog posts instead?
  7. Rethinking the blue box
    • I think revisiting the description of what the team is (e.g. are the lesson plans really “downloadable” as we describe?) could be important. We also should use this area to promote the use of lesson plans that already exist as well as contributing to the team in other ways (the list of which we should also review).

Some Specific Changes

  1. Teacher Resources – this page needs to be rewritten to be in line with the lesson plans that we’ve created and to rely less on outside resources.
  2. An FYI, I changed the time of the meeting on the contact form to the new time.
  3. There are some pages that may not make sense to include any more given the current direction of the team: proposed theme lessons, proposed user lessons, project status.

Please add your reactions to any of these ideas, suggestions of changes we can make to improve the user experience of the website, and any other thoughts about the website in the comments!