WordCamp Europe 2024 presentation recap

On June 14, I had the privilege to present the Training Team’s vision for Learn WordPress at WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe 2024. The presentation saw an engaged audience of 300-400 people in the main hall, with many more tuning in online. I wanted to document the feedback I received here for the team to consider as we continue improving Learn WordPress.

The presentation slides are available for download and reuse: Google Slides, PDF

Ideas from the community

  • Show Learn content in the WordPress dashboard.
    • Hosts would love for a way to show content right there without the user having to leave their site.
  • Provide Learn content in a way that hosts etc. can add/subtract modules as needed for their use cases.
    • Building a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party was one idea as a way to achieve this.
  • Clarify how users can get help with the content.
    • Learn could show a call-to-action “click here for help” within content.
  • Offer a glossary so that users know what to call the things they’re learning.
    • There have been previous efforts to create a unified WordPress glossary (Slack conversation) which would be great to integrate on Learn for learners.
  • Provide certifications for learning achievements.

#learnwordpress, #wordcamp

Project thread: The second Learn WordPress Course Cohort

Project Objective

Conduct a course cohort on the same content as the 2023 cohort. Experiment applying learnings from the last cohort, with an aim to build a sustainable program the Training Team can continue to administer for Learners on Learn.

Project Overview

One of the Training Team’s goals this year is to run 1-2 outcome/project-based course cohorts. A course cohort is defined as a group of people who go through a learning journey at the same time. In 2023, the Training Team conducted a cohort where learners worked through the Course “Developing your first WordPress BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.” on Learn. Participants gathered for a synchronous call each week where they could ask the instructor questions around the content they had worked through. The cohort received positive feedback from learners, but there were multiple takeaways in the administration of the cohort which are documented in this recap.

The aim of this project is to experiment applying the learnings from the last cohort, with the hopes of turning course cohorts into a sustainable educational offering on Learn. The project will use the same material as the last cohort, and will be offered to all applicants on the waiting list from the last cohort. All content will all be made available at the start of the cohort so that participants can move through content better at their own pace.

Project Members

@bsanevans (lead), @psykro (content instructor), @zoonini

Project Timeline

Start: May 1st, 2024
End: July 4th, 2024

  • May 2nd – Reach out to applicants from the last cohort about joining this cohort. Applicants who respond are added to the cohort’s SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel as cohort participants.
  • May 9th – Introductory message in Slack. Participants start working on course content.
  • May 16th – Synchronous call #1, discussing previous week’s content.
  • May 23rd – Synchronous call #2, discussing previous week’s content.
  • May 30th – Synchronous call #3, discussing previous week’s content.
  • June 6th – Synchronous call #4, discussing previous week’s content.
  • June 13th – Synchronous call #5, discussing previous week’s content.
  • June 20th – Synchronous call #6, cohort wrap-up.
  • July 4th – Archive the cohort’s Slack account.

Looking for feedback: Thumbnails for the Learn redesign

Design has also created thumbnail templates to be used across multiple media assets used in the WordPress project. For the Training Team specifically, these would be used for course/lesson featured images on Learn, videos uploaded to YouTube, and Online Workshop thumbnails added to Meetup.com. The team would start using these thumbnails as part of the redesign work currently happening on Learn.

Please take a moment to generate thumbnails using the provided template and provide your feedback in the comments by April 19th.


Follow the instructions below to download the Figma file to your computer and generate images there.

  1. Create and login to your Figma account at https://www.figma.com/
  2. Download the template file.
  3. Import the file into Figma by going to the Figma homepage and clicking on “Import” in the top-right corner.
  4. Follow the directions described in the file to generate visuals.

Out of the templates provided, Training would be using the following:

  • Topic as image: Course/lesson featured images
  • Title only: Lesson video thumbnails on YouTube
  • Title and guest & Title and multiple guests: Online Workshop thumbnails on Meetup.com

Then, please leave your feedback below. Here are some questions that would be particularly helpful for the design team.

  1. Is the process clear? Suggestions on the copy and the step by step flow are very useful.
  2. Did you export the visuals as expected?
  3. Did you face any problem during the process? Which ones?
  4. Is any helpful information missing?

#design, #learn-wordpress

Discussion: Bringing accessibility-first approaches into content development

At WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US 2023, @jominney, @newcomer22 and team published the Training Team Accessibility Checklist 🎉 I’ve recently been considering how we can bring accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility)-first approaches into the team’s content creation/review processes better.

What would it take for the team to be able to say “We’ve given our best effort to ensuring all content on Learn WordPress is accessible” when we relaunch the site with Learning Pathways in July this year? I’ve dropped some thoughts below, but this is just to get the conversation going. Let’s discuss in the comments until March 9th (Friday), and then consider next steps after that.


I noticed the WordPress project’s accessibility statement says:

WordPress aims to make the WordPress Admin and bundled themes fully WCAGWCAG WCAG is an acronym for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. These guidelines are helping make sure the internet is accessible to all people no matter how they would need to access the internet (screen-reader, keyboard only, etc) https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/. 2.0 AA compliant where possible.

  • Question: Is striving for WCAG 2.0 AA compliance a reasonable standard for content on Learn WordPress, too?

The team’s current Accessibility Checklist has some items that go beyond the scope of WCAG 2.0 AA, but is also missing some items within scope. Below is my personal take on what content creators specifically would need to be mindful of in order to create content that is fully WCAG 2.0 AA compliant.

(Note, I’m specifically considering what can be achieved in the content creating process – mostly conducted within the WordPress Editor. There are other coding-related considerations that must be made in the theme etc., which is worth its own separate conversation.)

  • Question: Is the following list an accurate representation of what content creators would need to be mindful of to create WCAG 2.0 AA compliant content?
  1. All non-text content has a text alternative. (Guideline 1.1 – Text Alternatives)
  2. Captions and transcripts are provided for all videos. (Guideline 1.2 – Time-based Media)
  3. Audio description is provided for all prerecorded video content. Or, narration in video content describes all important visual details, including actions, scene changes, and on-screen text. (Guideline 1.2 – Time-based Media)
  4. Instructions do not rely solely on components such as shape, color, size, visual location, orientation, or sound. (Guideline 1.3 – Adaptable)
  5. Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element. (Guideline 1.4 – Distinguishable)
  6. Text and images of text have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1. (Guideline 1.4 – Distinguishable)
  7. Unless essential, text should be used instead of images of text. (Guideline 1.4 – Distinguishable)
  8. No content flashes more than three times/second. (Guideline 2.3 – Seizures and Physical Reactions)
  9. The purpose of each link can be determined from the link text alone. (Guideline 2.4 – Navigable)
  10. Headings describe topic or purpose. (Guideline 2.4 – Navigable)

Points 3 (audio descriptions for video content) is currently not included in the team’s accessibility checklist.

  • Question: In the context of video content on Learn, what would adding audio description to videos look like? Is it possible to publish videos where all necessary content is included in the narration?

Finally, I think it would be great if we could move the accessibility checklist from being a final check made on content to something embedded in content development and review processes.

  • Question: How can we bring accessibility-first approaches into our content development and review processes?

#accessibility

Brainstorm: What trends about Learn WordPress leaners do we want to observe?

The Learning Pathways project was kicked off after an extensive survey of WordPress users and their needs. It was a step by the Training Team to pivot towards a more data-informed content planning strategy.

In order for the team to continue a data-informed content planning strategy, let’s brainstorm what learner trends we should start observing in order to best serve their needs. In the comments below, please note the following:

  1. What data would be relevant for the Training Team to surface?
  2. How would surfacing that data better serve our learners, team, and community?
  3. What considerations would be needed in order to surface that data?

We’ll close the initial round of comments on February 25th and consider next-steps.

Discussion: Training’s contribution to the 6.5 release (and beyond)

The WordPress 6.5 release squad has been announced. This next release is scheduled for March 26 and now’s a great time for the Training Team to discuss how we’d like to be involved.

Below is my proposal to kick off the discussion. Let’s discuss this in the comments below until February 5th. Team reps will then summarize the discussion by the team meeting that week.

Prioritize Learning Pathways content

The Learning Pathways project is a priority for the Training Team this year, with a scheduled launch for July 2024. Considering the limited number of content creators we have on the team right now, we do not have enough resources to meet that deadline and create a lot of release-related content at the same time.

Proposal around priorities

  • Continue to prioritize developing Learning Pathways content.
  • Identify no more than 3-5 pieces of high-impact content related to the release and clearly list these in the team.
  • Find opportunities to onboard additional content creators who can assist with this content development work.

Modifying GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ triaging processes

Historically, Training’s focus during releases has included identifying content needing updates as a result of the release. This has been done by reopening GitHub issues and, if the original assignee is unresponsive, re-assigning issues to new assignees.

As the team has started to track and analyze GitHub data (see Training Team 2023 Year In Review), we’re finding this process of reopening issues and changing assignees skews important metrics that represent team health – such as the “time to close” on an issue. To ensure the team can track and report accurate metrics, I propose the following changes.

Proposal around changes to GitHub triage processes

Once again, let’s discuss this in the comments below until February 5th.

#procedures

Training Team 2024 Goals Setting

Another year is starting, and it’s time to set our team goals again! In a similar fashion to last year, we’ll be hosting two synchronous sessions to brainstorm ideas. Anyone is welcome to join either of these sessions.

Before attending, please take some time to review the Training Team’s Team Values. These are our shared values that form the foundation of all we set out to achieve.

The Zoom link will be shared in the #training Slack channel 5 minutes before each session starts. The video recording and outcomes from each session will also be posted below for asynchronous conversation.

Timelines

Meet your 2024 Training Team Representatives

The Training Team nominated and voted on a number of motivated and dedicated contributors to the team. The new Team Representative nomination, voting, and vetting period is a special time where folks in the community affirm work ethic and confidence, and the outcome of these votes ensure fresh leadership and new perspectives guide the team.

It’s been amazing to watch the growth the team has experienced last year, and the rise in leadership in various individuals. This year, the Training Team keeps 2023 Team Representatives Benjamin Evans and Destiny Kanno, and adds one new Team Representative; Laura Adamonis.

This is a post to share more about your newly nominated Team Reps!


Laura Adamonis- @lada7042

Laura Adamonis lives in Greensboro, North Carolina with her husband and has two kids. Laura got started in WordPress in 2022 after looking for a career change that would provide a flexible and remote work environment. She started her agency, Add A Little Digital Services, in 2022. Laura started contributing to the training team in 2022 by co-hosting. She continued to co-host and then became a content creator in 2023.

Laura has a background in design and education that she brings to the training team. She is a previous Montessori teacher and was the robotics coordinator for the Greensboro Science Center where she taught robotics, engineering and coding.

Laura is a co-organizer for the Triad WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. and is a contributor to the DEIB, photo, and coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. teams.


Benjamin Evans – @bsanevans

Benjamin Evans is from Fukuoka, Japan, where he lives happily with his wife and puppy. Ben started making sites with WordPress in 2014. After teaching technical subjects to both undergraduate and postgraduate students for 5 years, Ben made a move to join Automattic in 2019. Since joining, Ben helped create a Japanese support team, created employee education curriculum, and worked on new employee training before becoming a Community Education Manager in 2022.

Ben has been a Co-organizer of a local Meetup group, has spoken at WordCamps, been a Training Team table lead for Contributor Days, and is a frequent Online Workshop facilitator on Learn WordPress.

In his non-working time, Ben likes to travel, play the flute, take long drives, and read books.


Destiny Kanno – @piyopiyofox

Destiny Kanno is from California, USA, and currently lives in Tokyo Japan with her husband and Formosan Mountain Dog. Destiny is currently Head of Community Education at Automattic, but she got started with WordPress in 2016 while working for the Japanese digital agency ASA Digital before joining Automattic as a Happiness Engineer in 2017. Her professional journey has allowed her to experience the various faces of WordPress inclusive of its end users and developers, enterprise customers, and open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. community.

Destiny became more involved with the WordPress community in November 2021, and began dedicating more of her time to the Training Team specifically in early 2022. Outside of the Training Team, Destiny is also a BlackPress Co-Organizer, a Japanese WordPress community member, and the Sponsors Team lead for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Asia 2024.

In her free time Destiny enjoys traveling, making music, watching films, and dancing.


Nomination Results

Over the course of three weeks the Training Team voted for their three nominees. Below are the results of the vote.

While the voting helps inform the vetting and final decision process, it is not the only way the current representatives evaluate the candidates. As noted in our Team Rep handbook page, the 2023 reps evaluated the three candidates using the following criteria as a guide:

After the voting period is over, the current team reps will review the candidates in descending order from the highest votes and evaluate their eligibility based on the following criteria:

  • If they have a Training Team badge.
  • Their last six months of activity in the Performing section of the contributor ladder.
  • Whether or not they have been a Training Team Representative within the last 2 years.
  • Diversity of the team repTeam Rep A Team Rep is a person who represents the Make WordPress team to the rest of the project, make sure issues are raised and addressed as needed, and coordinates cross-team efforts. group as evaluated through the Team Values.

Based on the above, we jointly decided that Laura Adamonis best fits the above criteria.

Within the past year Laura has moved from the Performing step in our contributor Ladder to the Leading step, and continues to contribute to the team as a Content Creator Faculty Member who creates video tutorials and hosts Online Workshops for the wider WordPress Community. With her outstanding commitment, the 2023 Team Representatives are excited to invite her to the team and look forward to working alongside her in this capacity.


Once again, we give huge thanks to our offboarding 2023 Team Representative @webtechpooja for her amazing dedication to the team and thoughtful collaboration with her fellow co-representatives.

The new Training Team Representatives are delighted to be serving the community in this capacity this year and look forward to what we will all accomplish together.

You can reach out to the Reps in the #training channel in the Make WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

Recap: GitHub updates and process refinements

The GitHub updates announced in July have finally completed! Here is an overview of the changes.

Here’s what’s new

  • GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ labels have been reduced from over 120 to just 27.
  • Issue templates have been reduced from 9 to 5.
  • 3 workflows have been set up to automate tasks:
    • Anyone can now self-assign issues by typing //assign in a issue comment.
    • Anyone can send their issue to the relevant project board by typing either //dev, //content, or //handbook when submitting feedback.
    • Faculty members can add content development checklists to their issues by typing either //tutorial, //online-workshop, //lesson-plan, or //course in either the issue itself or in a comment.
  • 2 new handbook pages have been published to document these changes:
  • How We Use GitHub and other handbook pages have been updated to reflect these changes.

Learn more at next week’s Online Workshops

@bsanevans will be hosting two Online Workshops next week to demonstrate these changes live, and answer any question folks may have. These Online Workshops are a perfect opportunity for:

  • Training Team Faculty and contributors who have been contributing to the team and want to get up-to-date with these latest changes.
  • New contributors interested in contributing to the Training Team and wanting to know how we use GitHub.
  • Any contributor from other Make WordPress teams interested in implementing GitHub processes to their team, too.

Come sign up to these workshops from the links below. Times are shown in your local timezone. A recording will be published after the event for anyone who could not attend.


While these changes bring much needed refinements to the Training Team’s processes, there’s always room for further improvements. If you have any feedback, feel free to comment below, or bring them up directly in the Training Team any time.


Thank you to the following contributors who contributed to this project, either directly or by providing feedback as changes were implemented 👏🏼👏🏼 @webtechpooja @jominney @sumitsingh @digitalchild @psykro

Also, thank you @milana_cap for sharing your insight from setting up workflows for the Docs team 🍪🍪

#github, #procedures

Looking for feedback: Updates to GitHub issue templates and labels

Summary: In an effort to streamline the team’s GitHub repo, the Next steps for GitHub updates project is looking to reduce the number of GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ issue templates in the repo from 9 to 5. The project is also looking for input as the current list of 119 labels is reassessed and reduced. Please leave your feedback on the proposed changes by October 17th (Tuesday).

Please review the new list of GitHub issue templates

In an effort to streamline the team’s GitHub repo, the Next steps for GitHub updates project has identified a need to reduce the number of GitHub issue templates. The expected benefits from this change include:

  • Less confusion for contributors creating new issues.
  • Less redundancy during topic vetting. (Currently, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) must vet the same topic for multiple content types.) 
  • Reduction in quantity and complexity of automations that will get set up.
  • Preparation for the consolidation of content types, as proposed in Looking for Feedback: Learn Website Information Architecture.

Below is a table listing the current 9 issue templates, and the 5 proposed templates they’ll correspond to. Each of the new templates have already been created and can be previewed from https://github.com/WordPress/Learn/issues/new/choose. (Scroll to the bottom of the list, and you’ll see these new templates prefaced with “_do-not-use_”.) Please leave any questions, suggestions, or other comments about these templates below.

Current issue templatesProposed issue templates
Bug Report Template
Content Feedback
Feedback
Topic IdeaContent Development (general)
Lesson Plan Template
Tutorial Template
Online Workshop Template
Course Template
Content Development (for Faculty)
Content Translation TemplateContent Translation
Meeting Agenda TemplateMeeting Agenda

Some points to note in these changes:

  • All feedback pertaining to Learn WordPress, regardless of whether it is regarding the website itself or the content, will be submitted in one issue. Automation similar to what the Docs team has will be set up, allowing any contributor (regardless of GitHub access) to triage and send these to their respective projects where they’ll be actioned on.
  • The current “Topic Idea” template will be renamed to clarify this is actually the issue content creators should use when creating content. These issues will be highlighted to SMEs to be prioritized in their topic vetting process.
  • Faculty who will immediately create content themselves may skip the vetting process. The four content templates the repo currently have are designed for this process, but weren’t labeled as such, and were therefore confusing general contributors. These will be consolidated into a single template marked “for faculty”. Automation similar to what the Docs team has will be set up, allowing Faculty to call the respective development checklist for their content type with a command.

Help us review the current list of GitHub labels

The project has exported the current list of GitHub labels into this Google Spreadsheet. We’re looking for Training Team contributors with experience in labeling issues in the team’s repo to help us document the purpose of each label.

Once completed, the project will:

  • Reassess labels based on their current use.
    • Similar labels may be consolidated.
    • Labels may be renamed for clarity.
    • Some project-specific labels may be replaced with custom fields.
  • Document the purpose of each label in the handbook.
    • Documentation will also include how new labels should be added and which labels are used in automation and, therefore, should not be modified.

Thank you for your feedback!

We’re looking for feedback on the proposed changes to issue templates and documentation regarding the repo’s current list of labels, by October 17th (Tuesday).


@webtechpooja and @jominney were co-authors of this post. Thanks also go to @yuli-yang for exporting the list of GitHub labels for the project!

#feedback, #github