Block-based Meeting Notes – Oct 7, 2020

Location: Make SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. #themereview

Facilitator: @kjellr

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ + Themes Updates

  • An overview of FSE + block-based theming for 5.6 release was shared: https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/10/07/block-based-themes-and-wordpress-5-6/
  • Here’s a post about what’s new to Global Styles / theme.json: https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/10/01/gutenberg-9-1-new-json-structure-for-fse-theme-json-files/
  • Try this web-based GUI to generate a theme.jsonhttps://gutenberg-theme.xyz 
  • Twenty Twenty-One theme development is going strong! The blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.-based version is set to begin after BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1 (Oct 20).

Discussion: which design tools should be enabled by default?

Gutenberg is building in a suite of design tools: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/20331. Some of these have already been implemented, and are available as theme options:

For these sorts of options, and upcoming ones like font weight, family, and expanded spacing controls, it would be helpful to get thoughts from theme authors about what should be enabled by default, versus having them be opt-in. 

Full discussion begins here, but here are some highlights:

@aristath shared:

For FSEFSE Short for Full Site Editing, a project for the Gutenberg plugin and the editor where a full page layout is created using only blocks. themes they should all be opt-out IMO… enabled by default and if defined as false in the theme.json file then disabled.
Note: I’m referring to FSE themes, not “classic” themes

Several folks agreed with this view, but @greenshady raised an important counterpoint:

Design features that may interfere with theme styles need to be opt-in by default… When it comes to theme-supported features in general, I tend to lean toward an opt-in approach.  That gives themers the ability to explicitly make a choice.

Some of the discussion centered around whether add_theme_support should be used to control editor features:

I’m OK with going opt-out, but I don’t think we should misuse the theme supports system if it’s not genuinely meant to be a theme-supported feature. 

@kjellr summarized the discussion saying:

  • If a theme has theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML., it seems ok to have these be opt-out. 
  • Otherwise, if the feature is expected to “just work” with themes without breaking something, it’s probably ok to enable it by default. Otherwise, they should be opt-in.
  • If these are “editor” features, and not something the theme needs to explicitly build in support for, then it may be confusing to use add_theme_support() for them. 
  • If users move between block-based themes and non-block-based themes, it will likely be confusing for seemingly unrelated features to turn on and off.

A follow on discussion ensued about how to make the distinction between block-themes and classic themes, in the themes directory and wp-admin.

@kjellr opened a meta ticket that could house the discussion between themes, meta, and design teams: https://meta.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/5465

#meeting-notes

Meeting notes Tuesday September 22nd 2020

Agenda: https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/09/21/themes-team-meeting-agenda-for-september-22/

Weekly updates:

In the last 7 days,

– 277 tickets were opened
– 275 tickets were closed:
– 260 tickets were made live.
– 22 new Themes were made live.
– 238 Theme updates were made live.
– 5 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
– 15 tickets were not-approved.
– 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

Open floor

Pushing for showing theme readme files in the admin

@joyously Asked:

If WP 5.6 is supposed to have FSEFSE Short for Full Site Editing, a project for the Gutenberg plugin and the editor where a full page layout is created using only blocks., could we get some pushing for showing theme readme files in the admin? This transition time is ripe for a way for themes to show more information to the user in a standard format.

The background to this problem is that the readme that is included in themes is not visible in the WordPress admin interface or in the theme directory (compared to plugins).

Related tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. tickets:

https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/36971

https://meta.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/215#comment:42

There was a two part discussion about if FSE, full site editing, would be ready in time for 5.6, and if more exposure on the problem with the readme not being visible would help get a patches created and merged.

-The status right now is that a design proposal needs to be submitted for how the readme can be presented in the WordPress admin.
We are looking for contributors who would be interested in working on this.

Will FSE impact requirements for themes that are not full site editing themes?

@martingarello Asked:

I would be interested in the next meeting to give an opinion on the impact of the changes in wordpress 5.6 on the adaptability and new requirements of old themes due to GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ FSE, and what would be those points to consider for those who make themes without thinking about Gutenberg ESF yet.

-There was a short discussion and the conclusion was that FSE should not impact the requirements for the old themes.

#meeting-notes, #themes-team

Meeting notes Tuesday September 8th 2020

Agenda: https://make.wordpress.org/themes/2020/09/07/themes-team-meeting-agenda-for-september-8/

Weekly updates:

In the past 7 days,

– 384 tickets were opened
– 387 tickets were closed:
– 364 tickets were made live.
– 15 new Themes were made live.
– 349 Theme updates were made live.
– 4 more were approved but are waiting to be made live.
– 23 tickets were not-approved.
– 0 tickets were closed-newer-version-uploaded.

Are themes allowed to add admin notices in updates?

The attendees discussed the question and the consensus was that adding admin notices in theme updates are currently allowed and no change needs to be made to the requirements.

A reviewer may still request an author to remove or stop adding admin notices if the reviewer considers them to be spam.

Adding notices with a link to a change log and short information about important changes made in the new version is allowed.

Open floor

During the open floor the following questions were brought up:

Prefixing the unique name for blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. pattern categories

When using the register_block_pattern_category function, the first argument, the slug or name of the categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging., needs to be prefixed. Otherwise the category may be overwritten by plugins.

@acosmin will make a small update to the requirements page to add this prefix to the existing prefix requirement.

As a reminder, the label for the category must use a translation function. Registering a custom category for block patterns is optional.

Is there a decision or movement regarding what should happen when a theme in the directory doesn’t follow the guidelines?

Link: What should happen when a theme in the directory doesn’t follow the guidelines?

A document has been outlined with suggestions of how the team can work with themes that do not follow requirements.

The team representatives have added comments to the document and it still needs to be discussed and properly formatted before it can be presented as a suggestion to the team.

Among other things it describes how the request will be sent to the theme author, when it is suitable to allow time to fix an issue, and when to suspend a theme immediately.


The next Themes Team meeting will be on Tuesday, August 22nd.

#meeting-notes, #themes-team

Meeting notes Tuesday 4th of August 2020

Today we held a meeting with the proposed agenda. The recap of the meeting is below and you can read the meeting transcript in the slack archives (a Slack account is required).

Weekly Updates

In the past seven days

  • 288 tickets were opened
  • 334 tickets were closed:
  • 292 tickets were made live.
    • 23 new Themes were made live.
    • 269 Theme updates were made live.
    • 4 more was approved but are waiting to be made live.
  • 34 tickets were not-approved.
  • 8 ticket was closed-newer-version-uploaded.

The review waiting time is down to 4 week.

We thank to all the reviewers, keep doing a great job!

Announcement: Allowing themes to use a top-level menu item.

The team reps decided to allow themes to use one top-level menu item. The decision was made after careful consideration in order to prevent users from abusing the notification system, and potentially spamming the post screen with upsell.

Having one top level menu will give theme authors enough exposure and a dedicated place where they can put the theme documentation.

Open discussion: WordPress 5.5 theme changes

There are lots of new changes coming in WordPress 5.5. You can read the field guide that explains things more in depth: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2020/07/30/wordpress-5-5-field-guide/

One of the things that will change is that the jquery-migrate will be removed, as a preparation for updating the jQuery version in WordPress 5.6. Feel free to test this: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2020/06/29/updating-jquery-version-shipped-with-wordpress/

Another thing to take care of are custom logos. Please check your theme custom logos to ensure they do not target the anchor tag directly in the CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site.. Link will be removed from homepage (but kept on other pages).

There was mention of having a global system to notify theme authors of the upcoming changes using email, similarly to what plugins team are doing when there is a major WordPress release.

Suggesting theme-related coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. tickets for WordPress 5.6

There are numerous tickets in core with Themes component tag: https://core.trac.wordpress.org/query?status=!closed&component=Themes

We should focus on the ones that have a patch so that they can be merged to the core, and focus on getting the nav blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience., and other blocks in WordPress 5.6

Date and time of the next meeting

The next meeting will be on August 25.

#meeting, #meeting-notes, #themes-team

Meeting notes Tuesday 9 June 2020

Today we held a meeting with the proposed agenda. The recap of the meeting is below and you can read the meeting transcript in the slack archives (a Slack account is required).

Weekly Updates

In the past seven days

  • 251 tickets were opened
  • 250 tickets were closed:
  • 230 tickets were made live.
    • 15 new Themes were made live.
    • 215 Theme updates were made live.
    • 2 more was approved but are waiting to be made live.
  • 20 tickets were not-approved.
  • 0 ticket was closed-newer-version-uploaded.

We have managed to cut down on the queue length, which is always good news.

We thank to all the reviewers, keep doing a great job 🎉

Biweekly meeting schedule to Monthly meeting for Themes Team

Summer is closing in and we realised (and observed during the last few months) that having many meetings (regular, blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. themes and triages) can be a bit tiring – both to the reps and to the contributors.

The proposal is to cut the Themes Team regular meeting to once a month plus an additional one if we have some urgent thing to discuss.

This will give us a bit more breathing room both to recharge and focus on priorities set by phase three of the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. editor development that are tied to the WordPress themes.

Open Floor

An issue was raised about Themes team not being a team anymore due to the lack of public discussions.

It was mentioned that the decisions are made and just announced.

This one is definitely on us (the reps). We should have been more tactful of how we presented the news (like changing the name of the team).
Team reps are always discussing and finding ways to improve this team’s impact in the WordPress community.

It’s hard to get noticed without active contributors, and in the last few years we have seen a decline in the active participants. To many authors theme repository is just one of the advertising avenues, which is disheartening.

One of the ways we wanted to spark the interest is to be involved with the core editor more, show that we are doing more than just review themes.

We definitely need to improve our transparency towards the community as team representatives. Writing more blogs about what we think would be a good way forward, and listening to advice and discussing them in the comments and then in the meetings.
What we do want to avoid are empty discussions that lead nowhere, as this is what kills the team. We need to adapt, change, and even innovate.

Andrea Middleton shared her experience from working in the Community Team:

In my observation, leading in the open is really difficult, and the process of learning how to do it effectively isn’t necessarily linear.

I’ve messed it up bunches of times — I think humans are just really prone to forming small groups, it helps us feel safe — and when it’s pointed out to me, I usually feel really dispirited and embarrassed.

For me, the best way to recover from that realization of “whoops, this conversation could/should have happened in the public channel” is to then go to the public channel and summarize the conversation there.

Andrea Middleton

It was also suggested that we should come up with a mission statement draft. Some goals that we as a team want to achieve.

This year we have put focus on Full Site Editing. We will continue working on preparing the community for the upcoming changes in the themes ecosystem.

Proofread by @williampatton

#meeting, #meeting-notes, #themes-team