Having a complete reply ready to copy can be very useful. You need to take care though that your reply is the correct reply, that you have read and understood the question and amended the reply as needed for their circumstances. Scanning a post, thinking that a pre-reply will work and then using that is not something you should do – it can antagonise the person with the issue if your reply is incomplete or even wrong.

Also be aware that the language used in a pre-reply may confuse the user. Check their post, check their blog even and use your judgement as to what they might not understand and then adjust your reply.

Here are some commonly-used replies:

Cannot Access Dashboard

Try <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/FAQ_Troubleshooting#How_to_deactivate_all_plugins_when_not_able_to_access_the_administrative_menus.3F">manually resetting your plugins</a> (no Dashboard access required). If that resolves the issue, reactivate each one individually until you find the cause.

If that does not resolve the issue, access your server via <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/FTP_Clients">FTP or SFTP</a>, navigate to `/wp-content/themes/` and rename the directory of your currently active theme. This will force the default theme to activate and hopefully rule-out a theme-specific issue (theme functions can interfere like plugins).

Error Related to Plugin or Theme Conflict

Try deactivating all plugins. If that resolves the issue, reactivate each one individually until you find the cause.

If that does not resolve the issue, try switching to the Twenty Fifteen theme to rule-out a theme-specific issue (theme functions can interfere like plugins).

Error Related to Missing or Damaged Core Files

Try <a href="https://wordpress.org/download/">downloading WordPress</a> again and delete then replace your copies of everything except the `wp-config.php` file and the `/wp-content/` directory with fresh copies from the download. This will effectively replace all of your core files without damaging your content and settings. Some uploaders tend to be unreliable when overwriting files, so don't forget to delete the original files before replacing them.

Out of Memory Errors

If you're seeing this error either suddenly (no specific task was done to cause the error) or frequently, try deactivating all plugins to rule-out a plugin-specific issue and try switching themes to rule-out a theme-specific issue.

Otherwise, here are three ways to increase PHP's memory allocation:

1. If you can edit or override the system `php.ini` file, increase the memory limit. For example, `memory_limit = 256M`

2. If you cannot edit or override the system `php.ini` file, add `php_value memory_limit 256M` to your `.htaccess` file.

3. If neither of these work, it's time to ask your hosting provider to temporarily increase PHP's memory allocation on your account.

(in the above examples, the limit is set to 256MB)

Error 500: Internal Server Error

Internal server errors (error 500) are often caused by plugin or theme function conflicts, so if you have access to your admin panel, try deactivating all plugins. If you don't have access to your admin panel, try <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/FAQ_Troubleshooting#How_to_deactivate_all_plugins_when_not_able_to_access_the_administrative_menus.3F">manually resetting your plugins</a> (no Dashboard access required). If that resolves the issue, reactivate each one individually until you find the cause.

If that does not resolve the issue, try switching to the Twenty Fifteen theme to rule-out a theme-specific issue. If you don't have access to your admin panel, access your server via <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/FTP_Clients">FTP or SFTP</a>, navigate to `/wp-content/themes/` and rename the directory of your currently active theme. This will force the default theme to activate and hopefully rule-out a theme-specific issue.

If that does not resolve the issue, it's possible that a `.htaccess` rule could be the source of the problem. To check for this, access your server via FTP or SFTP and rename the `.htaccess` file. If you can't find a `.htaccess` file, make sure that you have set your FTP or SFTP client to view invisible files.

If you weren’t able to resolve the issue by either resetting your plugins and theme or renaming your .htaccess file, we may be able to help, but we'll need a more detailed error message. Internal server errors are usually described in more detail in the server error log. If you have access to your server error log, generate the error again, note the date and time, then immediately check your server error log for any errors that occurred during that time period. If you don’t have access to your server error log, ask your hosting provider to look for you.

Hacked?

Remain calm and carefully follow <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/FAQ_My_site_was_hacked">this guide</a>. When you're done, you may want to implement some (if not all) of <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/Hardening_WordPress">the recommended security measures</a>.

File Upload Limit

The maximum upload size is controlled at the server-level, not by WordPress. Here are three ways you can increase the upload limit:

1. If you can edit or override the system `php.ini` file, increase the maximum file and post sizes. For example, `upload_max_filesize = 100M ;` and `post_max_size = 100M ;`

2. If you cannot edit or override the system `php.ini` file, add `php_value upload_max_filesize 100M` and `php_value post_max_size = 100M` to your `.htaccess` file.

3. If neither of these work, it's time to ask your hosting provider to increase the maximum file and post sizes on your account. Keep in mind that most decent hosting providers allow this, and If your hosting provider won't accommodate you, perhaps it's time to find a new hosting provider.

(in the above examples, the limit is set to 100MB)

WordPress.com Blog

Due to the differences between the free hosted blogs offered at wordpress.com and the self-hosted and self-installed version of WordPress supported here, you should probably ask <a href="http://en.support.wordpress.com/contact/">WordPress.com Support</a> instead.

Free Hosting Provider

(for free hosting provider recommendations and/or problems encountered on free hosting)

We typically don't recommend free hosting providers around here, as they often offer crippled servers that prevent WordPress from functioning properly.

If you want a free blog, try <a href="https://wordpress.com/">WordPress.com</a> instead. If you don't mind paying, the WordPress team has provided <a href="https://wordpress.org/hosting/">a list of recommended hosting providers</a>.

Hosting Provider Recommendations

Please tag the topic as “modlook” so a moderator can close it.

Per the <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/Forum_Welcome#Closing_Posts">Forum welcome</a>, topics like this are closed due to the amount of spam they attract.

The WordPress team has provided <a href="https://wordpress.org/hosting/">a list of recommended hosting providers</a>. For more details and other recommendations, please search through the forums or via Google (or your preferred search engine).

Offering to Pay/Hire

Please tag the topic as “modlook” so a moderator can close it.

Please try http://jobs.wordpress.net/ and http://directory.codepoet.com/

This topic will be closed as per the <a href="https://codex.wordpress.org/Forum_Welcome#Offering_to_Pay">Forum Rules</a>.

Requesting Support for a Commercial Product

If you use a commercial theme or plugin and need support, please go to their official support channel. In order to be good stewards of the WordPress community, and encourage innovation and progress, we feel it's important to direct people to those official locations. Doing this will provide the developer with the income they need to make WordPress awesome.

Forum volunteers are also not given access to commercial products, so they would not know why your commercial theme or plugin is not working properly. This is one other reason why volunteers forward you to the commercial product's vendors. The vendors are responsible for supporting their commercial product.

When people complain that ‘WordPress is hosting a site.’

Please tag the topic as “modlook” in case it requires additional attention from a moderator.

WordPress.org does not provide hosting for sites, it provides the software for other people to use their own sites on their own hosts. The WordPress <a href="https://wordpress.org/about/philosophy/">philosophy</a> and bill of rights permit people to use WordPress software for any reason they want, without any enforcement over legality or illegality. We leave that up to the web hosts. In cases of theft, abuse, harassment, or other such behavior, your best recourse is to contact the web host directly. You can use WHOIS to determine where the site is hosted, as well as resources such as http://www.whoishostingthis.com to find relevant information.