Building a Glossary

To keep your translations consistent, we recommend you build and use a glossary. A glossary is merely a list of words and definitions of words specific to your language. Technical terms are often very specific in certain languages and vary from one localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ to another. Creating a glossary ensures you use consistent terms throughout your entire WordPress translation.

There are a number of ways to build a glossary:

To start building it, we recommend looking through various glossaries (like this list of computer and internet terms and the WordPress glossary page) and add words to yours that might be ambiguous. You can add as many of these as necessary.

You can also include terms from the WordPress Jargon Glossary, and make use of existing translations from translated terminologies from other widely-used projects (eg Microsoft’s “Search Terminology” tool).

WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ Glossary Examples

Using the GlotPress Glossary Using the GlotPress Glossary

We recommend you use the GlotPress glossary feature. It can be used, indefinitely, for your WordPress translation and will always be centrally located.

On GlotPress, there are two types of glossaries.

  1. Locale glossary: Terms included in this glossary are suggested across all projects. Only GTEs can create and modify this.
  2. Project glossary: Terms are suggested on the specific project only. GTEs and PTEProject Translation Editor A Project Translation Editor (often referred to as PTE) is a person, who has access to validate strings on a specific project (for example BuddyPress, WooCommerce or Twenty Fourteen) for one specific locale. A project translation editor can approve strings that are added by translation contributors. Per project translation, editors are appointed by a general translation editor after a request by the project author or by the contributors themselves. of a project can create and modify its glossary.

You can also find more information in the GlotPress manual.

Creating a Locale Glossary Creating a Locale Glossary

If you are getting started, it’s best to build your locale glossary first. In the locale glossary, include stringString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings. and translation pairs for terms that are commonly used by WordPress projects, including WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress..

  1. Log into translate.wordpress.org as a General Translation EditorGeneral Translation Editor A General Translation Editor (often referred to as GTE) is a person, who has global access to validate strings on all projects for a specific locale..
  2. Go to the top page of your locale by searching for your locale name and clicking the “Contribute Translation” button.
  3. Click the “Create Locale Glossary” link in the box on the top right.
  4. To add a description of the glossary, click the “Edit” link next to the title of the glossary. 
  5. Create an entry or import a CSV file.
  6. When you mouse-over a term which has a translation in the locale glossary, a tooltip will show up under the term. This applies to all projects on translate.wordpress.orgtranslate.wordpress.org The platform for contributing to the translation of WordPress core, themes and plugins..

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Creating a Project Glossary Creating a Project Glossary

For terms specific to a certain project, create a separate glossary which is used only for that project.

  1. Log into GlotPress as a General Translation Editor or a Project Translation EditorProject Translation Editor A Project Translation Editor (often referred to as PTE) is a person, who has access to validate strings on a specific project (for example BuddyPress, WooCommerce or Twenty Fourteen) for one specific locale. A project translation editor can approve strings that are added by translation contributors. Per project translation, editors are appointed by a general translation editor after a request by the project author or by the contributors themselves..
  2. Go to a project page in your language, where you have permission to approve translations.
  3. Click the “Create glossary” link at the top right corner.
  4. Add a description of the glossary. For example, you may want to insert a link to the style guide in your language which the glossary is based upon.
  5. Create an entry or import a CSV file.
  6. When you mouse-over a term which has a translation in the project glossary, a tooltip will show up under the term.

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Importing/Exporting Entries Importing/Exporting Entries

The import and export links can be found at the bottom of each glossary page.

You can build a glossary in a CSV file (you can open this consolidated glossary CSV on an Excel or Google Spreadsheet and edit what you need) and import it at once.

If you need to backup or duplicate a glossary, use the link to download a CSV file.

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Other Resources Other Resources

To learn more about building a glossary, watch “GlotDict, Pte-Bot and BulkRejectGP. Why your community needs a glossary” session from WordPress Global Translation Day 2.

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