Polyglots Monthly Newsletter: October 2021

Welcome to the first edition of the Polyglots monthly newsletter! This monthly newsletter is a recap of news related to the WordPress Polyglots teamPolyglots Team Polyglots Team is a group of multilingual translators who work on translating plugins, themes, documentation, and front-facing marketing copy. https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/.

If you have any feedback or additions, please share them in the polyglots channel in the Making WordPress Slack. Or join us for one of our weekly chats, using the times listed in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. of this site.

📰 News from Make/Polyglots

WordPress Translation Day 2021 is finished! This was a month-long celebration of translator contributions to the WordPress project. There were a total of 22 local events, six global live-streaming events, and sprints organized by more than three contributor teams. WordPress Translation Day 2021 resulted in 733,583 stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings. suggested, 518,710 approved, and 697 new translation contributors. There will be more news in the coming weeks, so if you have pictures from any local events you would like included, please share them in the polyglots-events channel!

A few other exciting updates involving the Polyglots team:

  • Coinciding with International Translation Day, @yordansoares (LocaleLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ Manager for es_VE) was highlighted in the People of WordPress series. Read his contributor feature.
  • The post, How to handle block pattern translations, has a discussion on two different methods for translating blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. patterns in the Pattern Directory. It explores the possibility of translating user-generated block patterns via the related GlotPress project or an alternative method of forking block patterns into another language.
  • GlotPress meetings are re-starting and will occur every two weeks in the glotpress channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. The first meeting will happen on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 at 7:00 UTC. Everyone is welcome to join and share ideas.
  • Planning has started for WordPress 5.9. The expected release date is December 14, 2021. For translators, a hard string freezeString freeze The term "string freeze" is used by the core team to mark the end of changes to the strings of an upcoming release. A string freeze also means that there will be no more strings added to the core project. Sometimes a string freeze has two phases a soft freeze and a hard freeze. A string freeze is announced on the Polyglots blog by the current release lead. is expected on November 30, 2021.

📈 Latest stats

Via https://wp-info.org/polyglots-stats/ 

The latest weekly statistics are from October 6 to October 13, 2021. You can see the weekly difference in the number between the parentheses.

Releases205 (0) localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/, 68 (+1) up to date, 0 (0) behind by minor versions. Congratulations to the #es_DO locale!
TranslatorsThere are 723 (+3) General Translation Editors, 5,534 (+17) Project Translation Editors, and 55,427 (+297) translation contributors.
Site Language55.36% (+0.005%) of WordPress sites are running a translated WordPress site.

🌍 Locale News and Resources

A new version of GlotDict, a browser add-on for translate.wordpress.org, was recently released. It gives improvements to consistency suggestions, localized dates, and non-translatable items. 

Another add-on, WPGPTools, was updated as well. This update automatically deactivates similar features that are now available in GlotDict to help those using both add-ons. You can find more information on both tools in the Polyglots Handbook.

Did you know internationalizationInternationalization Internationalization (sometimes shortened to I18N , meaning “I - eighteen letters -N”) is the process of planning and implementing products and services so that they can easily be adapted to specific local languages and cultures, a process called localization. This is the process of making software translatable. Information about Internationalization for developers can be found in the Developer’s handbooks. was first added to WordPress in version 1.2, more than 15 years ago? Learn more about the history of translating WordPress in the Polyglots Handbook – History of the Team.

Are you looking for more ways to get started? If you’re translating or want to translate WordPress and any related projects into a specific language, here are some helpful resources:

If you need any help, ask in the polyglots channel in the Making WordPress Slack at any time. We’re a global team, so there’s almost always someone around!


Thank you to the following people who contributed to this month’s newsletter: @tobifjellner @webaxones, @courtneypk @harishanker @psmits1567 @vladytimy @amieiro @webcommsat @chaion07

#polyglots-monthly-newsletter

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – Oct. 13, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, October 13, 2021 at 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If you have any additions to the agenda, or if you would like to help facilitate the meeting, please share in the comments!

#5923-meta, #5925-meta, #weekly-meetings

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – September 29, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here is the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, September 29, 2021 at 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress Slack.

If you have any additions to the agenda, or if you are interested in helping to facilitate one of these chats, please share in the comments.

#weekly-meetings

Sign-up for the new Polyglots Monthly Newsletter

Are you interested in receiving monthly updates about top Polyglots news and posts? Good news! The idea for a Polyglots monthly newsletter is now a reality. You can sign up to subscribe via the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. of this site, or directly through this sign-up form.

The expected date for the first edition of the newsletter is October 15, 2021

What will it include?

Based on the idea that @nao shared in her post, the goal of the Polyglots monthly newsletter is to make it easier to follow Polyglots news. 

Since Make/Polyglots is used for updates, proposals, and requests, sometimes it can be difficult to follow all the posts. The monthly newsletter will collect these posts in a shorter format, so it is easier to follow Polyglots updates and discussions. You can find an example of the newsletter’s first edition here.

When will it be sent?

The newsletter will be sent on a monthly basis. Similar to how the Community team prepares the WordPress Meetup Newsletter, a draft for the newsletter will be shared ahead of time in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress Slack for feedback or additions. Once the newsletter is sent, it will also be published on Make/Polyglots as a monthly post, highlighting the top discussions and proposals on the blog.

How do you get involved?

The best way to help is to share this news with others! As the newsletter grows, it will help to have a larger audience to get feedback on the format, frequency, and any other improvements for the future.

If you’re interested in helping to write the newsletter, please leave a comment on this post. Any help is welcome, whether you’d like to write, review, or help share the news. 


Prefer to subscribe to only one option?

  • If you only want to receive the monthly newsletter, sign up via Sign-up for Top Polyglots News or this link. You can then unfollow the Make/Polyglots blog via https://subscribe.wordpress.com/
  • If you only want to receive immediate updates each time a new post is published on Make/Polyglots, make sure you’ve entered your email under Subscribe to All New Posts on the sidebar of this site.
  • This will not change any alerts that you’ve set up via your WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile.

How to handle block pattern translations

A few months ago, in July 2021, a new CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.-related translation project was added to translate.wordpress.org: Patterns. The new Pattern Directory was released along with WordPress 5.8, allowing site owners to choose from a selection of blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. patterns via a new directory.

The patterns currently included in the Pattern Directory were submitted and selected by WordPress community designers. Launching the Directory with these curated patterns was the first milestone. Next is working on allowing anyone to create and submit a new block pattern to include in the Directory.

Localizing block patterns

The current selection of block patterns has a fixed number of stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings., all of which can be found in the Patterns project. Note: localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ can also translate the Pattern Directory interface through the Meta > Pattern Directory project. As more patterns are added, two new challenges arise for localizing block patterns:

  • The ongoing and growing number of strings from user-submitted block patterns.
  • How to handle translating block patterns.

I’ve been thinking about both of these quite a bit and had a really helpful chat with @ryelle (thanks Kelly!) to better understand where development is going for the Directory.

Handling a growing number of strings

Strings for patterns added to the Directory are currently imported regularly into GlotPressGlotPress GlotPress is the translation management software that powers Translate.WordPress.org. More information is available at glotpress.org. using an APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways.. As new, user-generated patterns are also regularly added, the Patterns project can, and likely will, grow exponentially.

Like other MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. projects, there isn’t a threshold for translating Patterns – once a stringString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings. is translated, it will show in the Pattern Directory. At the same time, it’s also really satisfying to see that 100% next to a project you’re working on completing. I’m not sure if that will be realistic for future block pattern translations.

Translation methods

When thinking about how to translate all these new strings, one possible option is to skip GlotPress entirely and allow end-users to translate block patterns through the block editor. The result would look like a “forked” pattern, with an original version in English and a second, translated version. (For context, here’s a related Github conversation.)

I see a few benefits to this approach. First, it may be easier for anyone to translate block patterns since they’re basically recreating the pattern in their language. Second, it avoids a gigantic GlotPress project. Would we see more localized patterns this way? Maybe!

The downside: there is no review process. This would depend on users and/or Polyglots to catch any inconsistencies or mistakes by flagging them through the Pattern Directory. In other words, it’s totally separate from our usual translation process.

How to help?

Now is the perfect time for Polyglots to share feedback on the Pattern Directory’s future, especially on the best ways to localize the block pattern experience. 

What are your thoughts on:

  1. How important is it to your community that a translation project is 100% complete?
  2. If new strings are added every day, what would be helpful for communication and/or notifications? 
  3. How do you feel about a translation mechanism outside GlotPress? How can it help? How would it hurt your localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/?
  4. What else might help support your community in localizing block patterns?

I would like to keep the discussion on this post open until Monday, October 11th, 2021. Then, figure out the best way to share a summarized version of this feedback with the development team working on user-generated patterns. Anyone is welcome to comment and share thoughts!

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – September 15, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, September 15, 2021 at 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If you have any additions to the agenda, please share them in the comments.

#weekly-meetings

Join the New Locale Request Sprint for WP Translation Day

One reason Polyglots celebrate Translation Day is to raise awareness around translating WordPress. Even though translate.wordpress.org currently supports more than 200 localesLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ into which WordPress can be translated, people still regularly submit requests on the Make/Polyglots blog for additional language versions!

According to Ethnologue, there are about 7,000 languages spoken in the world!

Of course we’re interested in adding these new languages to our platform. However, before a language can be added, quite a few checks need to be done to make sure that everything is right, such as information about the language, what script it uses, how plural forms are handled, and so on. At in-person contributor days, Polyglots contributors often helped to review these new requests, checking for all the necessary information and helping to move them to the next steps. 

However, the last two years have had almost no such in-person contribution days, and this task has in reality been paused, for too long! Now that we’re celebrating WordPress Translation Day 2021 virtually, it is a great time to come together (virtually) and move this task forward.

Who can help

Experienced Polyglots contributors! New Polyglots are welcome to help as well, but it’s helpful to have some previous Polyglots experience and/or experience with contributing to your own localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/

If you’re new to Polyglots and looking for a way to get involved, you can find some helpful ideas in the Participate in your own time section.

How to help

The last few open requests are visible in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. on our Make/Polyglots blog, along with this link that brings you the full list.

Polyglots Global Mentors and contributors typically review each new locale request to check for a few things:

  • The locale doesn’t already exist and is, in fact, needed
  • The information related to the language is complete and accurate
  • There are enough people interested in helping to translate WordPress into that language
  • Encoding the system parameters needed to define the new locale in WordPress’ system

You can see examples from completed locale requests, which are a useful way to learn how others have approached requests in the past. 

When you’re ready to help review a locale request, make sure you’re familiar with and follow the steps in:

The goal is to make sure the information provided is accurate and complete, and that the person making the request has the interest and support to move forward with translating WordPress into this language. In other words, the goal isn’t to blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. anyone but to ask questions, be curious, and help guide contributors to the best solution.

Once a locale request has been fully reviewed and approved, it needs to be added to GlotPress. You can do this by opening an issue with the relevant information, following this format. Please open only one issue or pull request per locale, and be sure to track any information in the related spreadsheet.

When to help

This will be an asynchronous sprint taking place from September 17 to 30, 2021, during the WordPress Translation Day global events. That means you can help whenever you have time! Just follow the instructions above, and be sure to log what you’re working on in this spreadsheet. We’ll be using this spreadsheet to track our progress over the course of these two weeks and to help keep track of which requests are being worked on.

If you have any questions or need help along the way, please leave a comment on this post or ask in the #polyglots channel on the Making WordPress Slack. This way, we can share all the information in one place, and your questions will help others contributing, too!

Thanks to @tobifjellner for helping to write this post.

#wptranslationday

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – Sept. 1, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, September 1, 2021 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

  • Welcomes
  • Weekly release stats
  • Releases: 5.8.1
    • Release CandidateRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge. (RCRelease Candidate A beta version of software with the potential to be a final product, which is ready to release unless significant bugs emerge.) expected on Wednesday, Sept. 1
  • Help and feedback wanted:
  • FYI:
  • Open floor/achievements

If you have any additions to the agenda or if you’re interested in facilitating the next meeting, please share in the comments!

#weekly-meetings

Translation Day 2021: Team Update #2

Since the last Translation Day 2021 planning update, the organizing team has worked on:

Local Events

The Call for Local Event Organizers is open! If you are planning a local Translation Day event, whether online or in-person (where eligible), please fill out this form. The Translation Day planning team is collecting local events to help with marketing and promotions.

The team is also working to update resources for local event planners, including documentation and other resources to help prepare for your local Translation Day. If there is anything that would be useful for your planning, feel free to comment!

Global Events

The global events team is working on a variety of “coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.” or global events, in English, from Sept. 17th to 30th, 2021. 

The team has been working on outreach for interested organizers and speakers and has confirmed sessions on:

  • Panel on open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. translation communities, with contributors from Mozilla and Hyperledger
  • Panel on Polyglots tools
  • A Learn WordPress subtitling sprint

All global events, whether streaming or on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., will be published on wptranslationday.org.

The team is also working on an introduction/opening event, potential drop-in events (like last year), and some translator stories or interviews for Translation Day on September 30th. The events will likely be hosted on the Marketing team YouTube via Streamyard, similar to last year.

If you’re interested in a drop-in event or if it was helpful for your localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ last year, please comment to let us know.

Website

The website team is working to update wptranslationday.org and cleaning up files from previous years. After some testing and modifications, the team is working to update the website with all the information for Translation Day 2021 by September.

#wptranslationday

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – August 18, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, August 18, 2021 at 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If you have any additions to the agenda, please share them in the comments.

#weekly-meetings

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – August 4, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, August 4, 2021 at 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

  • Welcomes
  • Weekly localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ stats
  • Post-5.8:
    • Help localize blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. patterns via the Patterns project
  • FYI:
  • Open floor/achievements

If you have any additions to the agenda, please share them in the comments.

#weekly-meetings

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – July 21, 2021 (12:00 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, July 21, 2021 at 12:00UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If you have any additions to the agenda, please share them in the comments.

#weekly-meetings

Polyglots Training Ready for Testing

The Polyglots Training course is now ready for testing! The Polyglots Training is a course hosted on Learn WordPress, designed to help new translators start contributing and experienced contributors learn more about community building, ways to give feedback, and working with WordPress translations.

The next step is to have polyglots go through the course to test it and provide feedback.

Test the Polyglots Training

A screenshot of the Polyglots Training on learn.wordpress.org

The Polyglots Training course is made up of five modules:

  1. How WordPress Translations Work
  2. Working with WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.
  3. Building a LocaleLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ Glossary & Style Guide
  4. Collaboration and Team Building
  5. How to Give Good Feedback

To get feedback on the training, we are looking for volunteers who are willing to go through at least one of the modules. We will organize one to two Google Meet hangouts on each module to talk about the content and share any feedback, as if you were really taking the course. These hangouts will be scheduled over the course of ~five weeks, throughout August 2021.

It is not required, or expected, that you complete and join the discussions for all the modules. Even just one or two is really helpful. 

As a note: some styles on Learn WordPress are still being changed for this type of course. If you notice anything that looks unclear or buggy, that will be helpful feedback, too.

How to sign up

Anyone is welcome to test the course, and all experience levels are welcome. Getting your feedback is most helpful!

To sign up, please fill out this form and include information on what days and times generally work well for you. This will help us to schedule the hangouts.

Sign Up Form

If you have any questions, please add them in the comments! Also, if you have feedback but can’t commit to joining the cohort, you can still help. Feel free to share any thoughts or input on this post.

Help Translate Block Patterns

The Pattern Directory displays a range of block patterns available

You may have noticed a few new projects on Translate: Patterns and Meta > Pattern Directory. These projects were created to help provide a localized version of the new BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Pattern Directory.

The Pattern Directory will act similarly to the Theme and PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party directories, allowing users to search for unique block patterns to use on their sites via https://wordpress.org/patterns/.

Block patterns are a streamlined way to add pre-designed block layouts to your site. As both the use and features of block patterns expand, the Pattern Directory is expected to launch along with the upcoming July 20th, 2021 WordPress 5.8 release. 

Help Translate the Block Patterns

After the WordPress 5.8 translation is complete, you can help to create a localized experience of this new feature by translating the Block Patterns included in the new directory via:

https://translate.wordpress.org/projects/patterns/core/

This is a great project to encourage new or not currently active translation contributors to get involved in! Many Patterns have a small number of stringsString A string is a translatable part of the software. A translation consists of a multitude of localized strings., and it’s very easy to find the context – the References section shows a link to preview the Block.

Though patterns will be called from coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. WordPress via search in the Block Editor in the future, the translation percentage of the above project does not affect the core release threshold. In other words, the highest priority for translations remains the same: releasing the core language pack.

The Block Pattern Directory itself can also be translated via Meta > Pattern Directory.

Please note there still are some open issues around i18nInternationalization Internationalization (sometimes shortened to I18N , meaning “I - eighteen letters -N”) is the process of planning and implementing products and services so that they can easily be adapted to specific local languages and cultures, a process called localization. This is the process of making software translatable. Information about Internationalization for developers can be found in the Developer’s handbooks. of the directory (RTL, categoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging., strings in .jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. file are not deployedDeploy Launching code from a local development environment to the production web server, so that it's available to visitors. yet).

What’s coming next

The future of the Block Pattern Directory will include third-party, user-generated block patterns. The mechanism for translating these block patterns has not been finalized. This is a great time to follow the related conversations and help weigh in on the future of how to translate user-generated block patterns.

There are a few possibilities being discussed, including:

  • Building a localeLocale Locale = language version, often a combination of a language code and a region code, for instance es_MX denotes Spanish as it’s used in Mexico. A list of all locales supported by WordPress in https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/teams/ picker in the Block Pattern Directory to filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. block patterns by language, i.e. https://ja.wordpress.org/patterns/ 
  • Creating a localized copy of each locale, similar to forking an existing block pattern.

Conversation around how to translate user-generated block patterns in the future is happening on this proposal from @tellyworth, and will continue to happen in #core and #core-editor chats in the future. Updates on these discussions will also be included in the regular Polyglots weekly meetings and on the Make/Polyglots blog as well.

Thanks to @nao and @dd32 for helping to write this post!

#announcement

Agenda: Weekly Polyglots Chat – July 7, 2021 (12:00 UTC and 22:30 UTC)

Here’s the agenda for our weekly chat.

This meeting will be held at Wednesday, July 7th, 2021 12:00 UTC in the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

There will be an additional meeting at Wednesday, July 7th, 2021 at 22:30 UTC for the Americas-friendly timezone.

If you have any additions to the agenda, please share them in the comments.

#weekly-meetings