Translating Themes and Plugins

Howdy all you wonderful polyglots!

We’re getting very, very close to turning on translations for themes and plugins. Within the next few days (or weeks), we’ll start importing active themes and, shortly there after, plugins to translate.wordpress.org.

The first import might be a bit… painful. There aren’t a lot of sorting options built-in to GlotPress, so importing, say, 1500 themes will make it hard to see which theme is important. We’re working on that. After import, it will be important to use translate.wordpress.org and find “pain points” in the experience. Then… let us know! You can file a ticket on meta trac with an idea for improvement and we’ll work to improve things over time. Or, you can ping me personally (sam on Slack) or even just leave a comment here.

For themes and plugins with their own, external translation sites, we’re recommending the author post here on make/polyglots with a list of their translation editors and request that they be added to translate.wordpress.org with project-level permission. That means that they’ll only be able to approve translations for the specific theme or plugin, which they can already approve translations for on an external site.

That might sound a bit complicated, but I wrote up a handbook page with all of the details. Please read through and let us know if you have questions.

One thing I’m recommending to everyone is to follow a hashtag for your locale. For example, the Swiss German translation editors would follow #de-ch in their WordPress.org profile notifications. Any time, across WordPress.org, someone enters #de-ch, they’ll receive an email notification about it. It’s a great way for anyone “in the know” to ping translation editors and entire teams.

P.S. If you haven’t already, now is a great time to translate the theme and plugin directory interfaces.


Related posts: Meta team, Theme team

#glotpress, #meta, #plugins, #themes