Year End Summary – 2018

Well 2019 is almost here so it’s time to look at a years worth of plugin reviews.

Everything

Here’s the chart of everything for the whole year. That gap in January-March is due to a snafu in the system. It wasn’t properly recording anything, so we weren’t able to collect stats.

Highs and Lows

Due to the above gap, our ‘least’ for the weeks are a little off, but you’ll get the general idea of how much we review a week:

Requested Rejected Closed Approved Pending
Most / week 281 99 1171 149 730
Least / week 101 2 9 36 566
Average / week 164 21 341 87 651
YEAR TOTAL 7095 1062 13034 3752 566

What it Means?

We can see that roughly 52% of all submitted plugins are actually approved.

Why are only about half of all plugins approved? I could give you a lot of math explanations, but the crux of it is this: people don’t reply to emails.

Around 35-40% of plugin submissions are pended, either for more information or for code issues, and the majority of those simply never finish a review.

This year, though, we have an abnormally high number of closed plugins (see those gold spikes). This comes from a lot of cleanup of unused plugins (ones where code was never committed) as well as plugins with email-bounces. Due to GDPR, many email servers changed their reporting so we’re finally getting some accurate data on bounced emails.

Of the closed plugins, about .003% of developers reached out to us about them, and of those, the majority were because emails were out of date. This is why I’m always harping on people to make sure their account emails work and don’t auto-reply or bounce.

If your email bounces, we’re not going to email you or hunt you down to figure out who’s supposed to own a plugin. It’s not an efficient use of our time for people who aren’t maintaining their accounts. We’re aware it’s not very nice, but since our accuracy rate is well into the 99th percentile, it’s more effective to close the plugin.

What’s the take away from this? Check your emails. If you submitted a plugin and didn’t get an automatic reply telling you it was received and what the plugin slug was, then you’re having trouble getting our emails and you should add plugins@wordpress.org to your email’s never-spam list. If you did get that email, count 7 days from that. You will have another email from us by then, either as an approval or a rejection (which always comes with a reason why).