Frontend Release v3.4.8 and a call for a11y testing

v3.4.8 of the OpenverseOpenverse Openverse is a search engine for openly-licensed media, including photos, audio, and video. Openverse is also the name for the collection of related code repositories that make up the project. frontend released today. View the full changelog in GitHub.

Most crucially, we have released a new version of our audio track component with accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) improvements. We would love if folks with #accessibility expertise could test the component and provide any feedback. Specifically, we’re looking for feedback on the experience of using our audio component with keyboard controls in a screen reader. Here is an example URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org:

https://wordpress.org/openverse/search/audio?q=dance

Any identified bugs or concerns can be shared here in GitHub. Thank you!

We also fixed a bug with the ‘load more’ button disappearing when one media type returned zero results, along with a number of small improvements.

Thank you to all contributors!

Openverse Biweekly Update – September 5th

The OpenverseOpenverse Openverse is a search engine for openly-licensed media, including photos, audio, and video. Openverse is also the name for the collection of related code repositories that make up the project. Biweekly update is an every-two-weeks summary of the work completed by the Openverse team.

Openverse and WCUS

Openverse will be participating in WCUS’ contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. remotely. Details here. We’ve also had a new community member graciously offer to help out the folks at our table, so we’ll have an in-person presence as well as our remote support. @krysal and I (@zackkrida) along with @dhruvkb (for a bit) will be hanging out in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. to support contributors.

iNaturalist and our latest media totals

iNaturalist is a joint initiative of the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society.

This period we added +14,778,368 new images and +4,484 new audio files. A majority of these images came from our new iNaturalist integration, written by community contributor @beccawidom. We’ve so far only ingested a small subset of their collection, but have added some remarkable images to Openverse as a result. We have open PRs to make some optimizations to the iNaturalist DAG moving forward.

Call for a11yAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) testing on our new audio track

At the end of last week we merged a substantial PR from @dhruvkb which makes major accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) and usability improvements to our audio track component. Tracks can be played/paused, seeked (bonus tip: you can do a faster seek by pressing Shift+left/right arrows), and navigated to all from a single root element. Previously, the component required navigating to individual controls to perform a specific action. We’ve also added a helpful snackbar when navigating by keyboard that announces the available controls to users. Here’s a quick video of how it works:

Which you can compare to the previous behavior, along with observing my failed attempts to seek the audio tracks while focused on the play/pause buttons:

While we’ve done local testing in MacOS with Safari and VoiceOver, and with NVDA on Windows, we are not daily screen reader users. Frankly, we’ve also found reference implementations of audio players from SoundCloud, as an example, to be woefully inadequate in their accessibility. We would love if any regular screen reader users or general #accessibility experts could take a look at our staging audio results page and give us some feedback. We’ll be posting a full request to our Make blog later this week.

Other Highlights

  • Thanks to smart diagnostic work and memory profiling from @sarayourfriend and a rapid, high-quality refactor from @olgabulat, we were able to mitigate our frontend memory leak and close the project ahead of schedule.
  • It’s the last day to leave your thoughts on our team priorities for the month; we’ve had a lively discussion with several community members chiming in. Let us know what you’d like to see us work on!
  • One thing we’ll definitely be working on is the Openverse migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. away from using an iFrameiframe iFrame is an acronym for an inline frame. An iFrame is used inside a webpage to load another HTML document and render it. This HTML document may also contain JavaScript and/or CSS which is loaded at the time when iframe tag is parsed by the user’s browser.. This will make some dramatic improvements to SEO and overall usability. Link-sharing, in particular. Stay tuned for a kickoff post on that project in the coming weeks.
  • We’re making steady progress on our Catalog milestone to refactor all of our existing provider scripts. This standardization will make making bulk changes to provider script behavior a breeze, and allow us to make optimizations and improvements centrally that will improve the data quality and performance of all of our provider scripts.

#biweekly-update