Meta chat summary: February 12th, 2020

Refresher: What’s MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. responsible for?

The Meta team makes WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/, provides support, and builds tools for use by all the contributor groups. If you want to help make WordPress.org better, sign up for updates from the Meta blog.

Attendance

@tellyworth, @sergey, @valentinbora, @clorith, @poena

Facilitator: @tellyworth

Note taker: @valentinbora

Actionable points

  1. @dufresnesteven local dev setup process and identifying missing components
  2. @tellyworth to clarify who’s to take a fresher and more complete dump of the live database (pruned and sanitized) for easier local setups
  3. @tellyworth to reach out for advice on marketing ourselves better to new contributors
  4. @valentinbora to march forward on tickets #5017, #5018, #5015, #5008
  5. @clorith to further specify how to optimize the relationship with meta committers

Next meeting

Thursday, February 26, 2020, 22:00 (see all #meta meetings here)

Topic: Contributing to Meta

@valentinbora mentioned he found it very gratifying to work on Meta due to changes potentially going live faster than with CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., and wanted to find out whether new contributors could be encouraged to consider joining the effort

@sergey shared an interesting WordPress.tv talk he liked on the topic

@tellyworth went on to say that the Meta dev environment is a bit difficult to set up and would like to see the barrier for entry lowered.

@valentinbora confirmed that was the case but not as difficult as it looked at first sight. He suggested simply improving the documentation first, while working on a more fully-blown means of local setup

@poena mentioned they had a theme triage earlier and the attendees didn’t know what the meta environment was or what the Meta team was responsible with

@valentinbora stressed out the goals to be lowering the barrier to entry and increasing motivation for new contributors to join

Topic: Tickets requiring attention

@tellyworth mentioned a decrease in the overall number of Meta tickets, which is commendable

@valentinbora raised awareness to #5017, #5018 and #5015 while emphasizing the last two to cause some friction in the migrationMigration Moving the code, database and media files for a website site from one server to another. Most typically done when changing hosting companies. process. See more details about it by checking the Summary for Docs Team Meeting: February 10, 2020

@valentinbora also mentioned #5008 and #5013 to be awaiting feedback from Design

@tellyworth emphasized the Support Forums as being the component with most open tickets and @valentinbora praised @clorith for the helpful Bug Scrub held recently

@clorith stressed the importance of defining a focus area ahead of time for a good scrub in order to avoid getting lost in details and opinions across some of the lengthier tickets

@clorith and @tellyworth agreed that an approach where we’d ask a committer to quickly review and close a well-defined set of tickets would make a lot of sense to improve delivery

Transcript

https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C02QB8GMM/p1581544979268900

#meeting, #meeting-notes

Plugins, Themes, and Translate.WordPress.org

As mentioned a few times, we’re going to be enabling the translation of active plugins and themes in the WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ repositories on translate.wordpress.org. Today, we had a chat in #metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.-i18n (logs) about how the non-technical side of this will work.

As a quick recap: We’re making good progress on the relevant pieces of Rosetta, GlotPress, and all the related scripts needed to import plugins and themes that are in the WordPress.org directories into translate.wordpress.org and make them available for translation. Every pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and theme will then be able to take advantage of languages packs, meaning no more delay in language updates and smaller plugin downloads.

Here are a few of the points we discussed on how this process will work:

  • Eventually, all active themes and plugins in the WordPress.org directories will be imported into translate.wordpress.org and made available for translation. The “eventually” is important to note as we will be importing a few at a time to ensure GlotPress can scale accordingly. It’s also important to note that “active” is a theme or plugin that has been updated in the last year. Further, even plugins and themes that are not i18n-ready will be imported so that their descriptions can be translated.
  • Additionally, any plugins or themes that do not live in the WordPress.org directories will not be allowed on translate.wordpress.org. For example, commercial plugins.
  • During the initial import, we intend to import all strings – included translations – directly from the plugin’s svn repository on WordPress.org. We will not continuously import these strings, however. Ideally, after the initial import, a plugin would then delete the strings from the svn repository, making their download smaller and immediately taking advantage of the language packs generated by translate.wordpress.org.
  • For a language pack to be updated, the string must be updated in translate.wordpress.org.
  • The above point means that if a theme or plugin author uses a different site for translations, those translations must be brought over to translate.wordpress.org. If the theme or plugin has an active translation community, they can work with the polyglots team to bring translation editors over to the community. These translation editors can be limited to specific plugins, at the discretion of the locales translation editors. These translation editors can import strings for the plugin/theme, should they wish to continue using a different site for translations. (When we get closer to this, I’ll create a sample post that theme and plugin authors can use.)

That’s a lot to take in, so please let it digest. 🙂

One thing we also discussed was the possibility of enabling GlotPress installations to “talk to” each other, such that translate.wordpress.org could import strings from another GlotPress site (for example, translate.yoast.com), whether as a feature of GlotPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. or a plugin. Currently, this is an open question. We plan to discuss the technical questions of this possibility at next week’s #meta-i18n chat (Tuesday, July 14 2015 11:00 UTC). Note that we will not wait for this feature before continuing with our planned import.

A few other notes:

  • We discussed the possibility of adding a banner to the specific plugin/theme’s page on translate.wordpress.org pointing the external site where translations are active, should a plugin/theme not use translate.wordpress.org as the canonical source for their translations. Currently, I believe the answer is “no banner” but it’s a conversation we should have and re-evaluate over time.
  • Outside of that, it occurred to me after our chat that we will need to add translation editors to the relevant theme/plugin page. For example, if a translator editor only has permissions to approve translations for Hello Dolly, we should note that on the Hello Dolly page within translate.wordpress.org. Example: “Strings for [project name] are approved by the German translation editors [link], as well as username, username, and username.”

If you’re interested in any of this topic, we’d like to get some feedback on any/all of the above. Please leave your comments here, not in #meta-i18n, so others can see your feedback. We’re especially interested in feedback from plugin and theme authors who do not currently have translations and one’s who use an existing product for their translations.

#i18n, #meeting, #plugins, #themes, #translations

As we’ve been doing weekly we had another…

As we’ve been doing weekly, we had another metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. triage yesterday. @atimmer, @coffee2code, @iandunn, @nacin, @Otto42, and @samuelsidler attended.

We’d love some feedback on #30. That is, anyone interested in creating better theme preview data, it’d be great to have it submitted to the ticket. There’s a current proposal that could use some feedback as well.

@jenmylo: For #482, will the training team be using their P2 or using the community P2? They’ve been using the community one recently. If they’ll continue to use the community P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/., we can wontfix that ticket.

Next week (Friday at 17:00 UTC), we’ll be looking at the Plugins Directory component (I won’t be present).

#meeting, #triage

We did a meta trac triage on Friday…

We did a metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. triage on Friday.

  • @Clorith, @coffee2code, @georgestephanis, @iandunn, @otto42, @samuelsidler attended
  • We’ll be doing another meta trac triage exactly a week later on May 16, 2014 17:00 UTC.
  • Our focus this time (and next) was on the General component in trac and closing out some of the issues. We made it through about half of the tickets in that component (20) and a handful were fixed.
  • @otto42 wants to ask anyone and everyone for help with responsive fixes for WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ (#461)
  • A number of tickets need follow up. Some have been assigned so we know who’s on point. I’m taking a number of others.

Those interested, we’ll see you next week!

#meeting, #triage

We’re going to do a meta trac triage…

We’re going to do a metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. triage this coming Friday at 17:00 UTC (10am PDT, 1pm EDT) in #WordPress-meta. We’ll be steering clear of devhub tickets (the devhub chat is a good time to look through those) and focusing on older tickets. If you’re interested in working with the meta team, join us!

#meeting, #triage