Meta Team in 2015

Just a week into 2016, it’s time to take a look at what the metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team did in 2015. As a reminder, here’s a version of this post from last year.

Sure, I could give you a long list of tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. tickets, but instead here’s a general overview of the bigger things we accomplished:

  • Theme Directory: Launched an all-new theme directory, completely open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. and powered by WordPress instead of bbPressbbPress Free, open source software built on top of WordPress for easily creating forums on sites. https://bbpress.org. 1.x. Lists are now sorted by active installs instead of downloads and you can “favorite” your favorite themes.
  • PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party Directory: Crossed 1 billion cumulative downloads. Redesigned the plugin directory. Lists are now sorted by active installs instead of downloads.
  • Translate: Launched the ability to translate WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ themes and plugins directly on translate.wordpress.org, language packs for said themes and plugins, added a stats overview, and refreshed the GlotPress interface to improve usability.
  • Rosetta: Introduced internationalized theme and plugin directories for all locales, automated Rosetta deploys, and fixed a number of issues throughout the sites. On the forums side, we launched two new internationalized forums, powered by bbPress 2.x.
  • WordCamp.org: Version 1 of the JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. was added to WordCamp.org, which involved customizing it so only whitelisted data was exposed. Additionally, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Payments, WordCamp Site Cloner, and WordCamp Remote CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. were launched, to say nothing of the dozens of contributions reviewed and committed. Part of WordCamp Central received a refresh as well.
  • Trac: Mentions were added throughout all of the WordPress.org trac instances so you can -mention someone. Additionally, the entire design was refreshed, among other improvements.
  • Meta Environment: A number of sites were added to the WordPress Meta Environment including: BuddyPress.org, bbPress.org, wordpress.org/themes, global.wordpress.org/themes, and translate.wordpress.org.
  • Open Source: The changes in this list were mostly open source as the meta team is committed to open sourcing as much of WordPress.org as possible. In 2015, we also open sourced the Showcase theme and reviewed/committed numerous patches from contributors (see below).
  • Feature Plugins: Added the ability to sync feature plugins on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ with the plugin directory.
  • SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.: Worked on further integrations including /announce for team leads and better warning/error reporting for Translate and Meta services.
  • Devhub: Added user contributed notes to the developer reference, migrated hundreds of examples from the Codex, and added Used By and Uses section to show direct relationships.
  • Profiles: A number of teams received badges for the first time, including the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., polyglots, and training teams. Favorites was expanded to include themes and updated with plugin icons and new ratings data.
  • Centralized Logins: We started the process of centralizing logins on WordPress.org, which will lead to other improvements.

There’s a ton more that we did throughout the year. You can keep up with changes using the meta trac timeline.

Credits

The following 79 people‡ received 149 props over the course of 2015 to the meta repository and its related project: @adrian2k7, @akirk, @amylaneio, @ankit-k-gupta, @atimmer, @bandonrandon, @bansod_deven, @boonebgorges, @bordoni, @bowlhat, @brashrebel, @chaselivingston, @clorith, @coffee2code, @colorful-tones, @dd32, @deconf, @djpaul, @drewapicture, @dzver@empireoflight, @erikguimaraes, @folletto, @francescolaffi, @garyj, @helen, @hideokamoto, @hugobaeta, @iandunn, @isaackeyet, @jasonm4563, @jeffgolenski, @jeherve, @jeremyfelt, @joefletcher, @johnbillion, @johnjamesjacoby, @johnnypea, @kovshenin, @kraftbj, @liljimmi, @markoheijnen, @matheusfd @mcguive7, @mdawaffe, @melchoyce, @mercime, @mj12982, @morganestes, @nacin, @nao, @nataliemac, @nathanshubert, @nbachiyski, @netweb, @nickmomrik, @nvwd, @obenland, @obrienlab, @ocean90, @otto42, @pauldewouters, @pento, @pixolin, @rachelbaker, @ramiy, @rclilly, @ryelle, @sa3idho, @samuelsidler, @sergeybiryukov, @siobhan, @stephdau, @tfrommen, @tyxla, @valeriosouza, @yoavf, @zodiac1978, and @_dorsvenabili.

A HUGE thank you to all of the contributors above. I’d especially like to call out @sergeybiryukov and @ramiy, who both made large contributions (21 and 15 props, respectively) to the meta team last year.

As a basis for comparison, here’s a table of our stats in 2014 versus 2015.

2014 2015
Contributors 45 79
Props 113 149
Committers 14 18
Commits 875 1163

(The table above only includes props, committers, and commits for the meta repository, not related projects.)

‡ Note that this total includes contributors to the Meta Environment, Camptix, and Tagregator repositories.

#meta